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Blue vs. Green?

Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 8:36pm

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FiveIronFrenzy

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What is the difference from a Greenscreen and a Bluscreen?

Help?
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 8:37pm

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Brettsta

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They do the same things. It all depends on if you are wearing or holding anything that has a shade of green or blue, you choose based on that.
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 8:39pm

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pboniface

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the colour.. smile


Well, If you were all wearing green, then filming in front of a green screen would make parts of you disappear, so you film in front of a blue screen.

Unless you are wearing blue, in which case that wouldnt work very well either..

You can even use a Red screen if you want, but that has strange effect on peoples skin (Especially ones with a bad sunburn!)
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 8:51pm

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FiveIronFrenzy

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Thanks a lot!
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 10:29pm

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AndrewtheActorMan

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what they said is correct, but search the forums next time, it has been discussed ALOT before


Andrew biggrin
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 10:39pm

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owen rixon

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have any of you ever seen red screening before. I saw it on the making of Independence day, but no1 ever seems to mention it. Is it a recognised technique, or did the makers of independence day have some fancy tricks up their sleeves.
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 10:48pm

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Simon K Jones

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Wherever possible, use a greenscreen with miniDV, because it captures more green colour information than anything else, so will give better results.
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 11:00pm

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Andreas

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yeah, I have noticed that to! that green works better! thought it was something with the ccds!
Posted: Thu, 1st Jan 2004, 11:59pm

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Axeman

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owen rixon wrote:

have any of you ever seen red screening before. I saw it on the making of Independence day, but no1 ever seems to mention it. Is it a recognised technique, or did the makers of independence day have some fancy tricks up their sleeves.
Traditionally, Blue is used because there is no blue in people's skin tones, and older cameras were more sensitive to blue light, so it was easier to seperate back when keying was an optical process. With the advent of digital video, blue and green are frequently used, again, because either one is not prevalent in skin tones. Primarily, that is why red is not frequently used. But if you have a subject that contains blue and green, a red screen would not be entirely uncommon. There may also be other reasons to use it, I'm not sure.

They also use black at times, especially if the subject is reflective. If you use a colored screen behind a reflective subject, the reflections will end up coloring the subject and making the key very difficult to pull. So they use black.
Posted: Fri, 2nd Jan 2004, 2:30am

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blaine

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Wherever possible, use a greenscreen with miniDV, because it captures more green colour information than anything else, so will give better results.
Humm intresting, thanks
Posted: Fri, 2nd Jan 2004, 6:14pm

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pboniface

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Tarn wrote:

Wherever possible, use a greenscreen with miniDV, because it captures more green colour information than anything else, so will give better results.
Does that include the 3 CCD cameras with Pixel shift on the green ?
Posted: Fri, 2nd Jan 2004, 6:26pm

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fallen

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indeed it does. thats why they have pixel shift on the green channel
Posted: Fri, 2nd Jan 2004, 6:30pm

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JohnCarter

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owen rixon wrote:

have any of you ever seen red screening before. I saw it on the making of Independence day, but no1 ever seems to mention it. Is it a recognised technique, or did the makers of independence day have some fancy tricks up their sleeves.
Red screen is used a lot in model work - it was actually used on Red Dwarf (the UK cult TV show), in some places in Star Wars, in the Right Stuff, a whole lot of films actually. It is not very frequently used because it's a color that is hard on cameras (in terms of perception - even film is less sensitive to red) and also one that plays havoc with skin tones.