You are viewing an archive of the old fxhome.com forums. The community has since moved to hitfilm.com.

Would would you do, sack the actors ?

Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 9:36am

Post 1 of 35

b4uask30male

Force: 5619 | Joined: 22nd Feb 2002 | Posts: 3497

Windows User

Gold Member

Hi
This was asked over a year ago and my reply ( I think ) was I don't have that problem.

Recently while making these short films my actors are cancelling at the last minute, ( in fact in a PM after I have left, thus I'm standing on location waiting for them )
Just had 3 cancel this morning for todays shoot.
Other than telling them to use the bl..dy phone, what else would you do.
Makes me feel like sticking to poser, at least they don't let you down.

Any tips ( without having to pay them )
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 10:07am

Post 2 of 35

billy3d

Force: 2678 | Joined: 3rd Jan 2002 | Posts: 1273

Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Rating: +1

hmm, u'r having the same problem i have, all my friends will rather play on the x-box than make a movie, which's got a lot of pretending to do.
But the trick i do is involve them is the thinking process, it makes them more interested hence, reach on time for the shoot. My advice may not be right cuz i'v done on big shoot for my final term english project.
OTHER WISE
Make a movie with your clones! Its a lot of fun! You can make it with 3d goggles too!
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 10:18am

Post 3 of 35

Sollthar

Force: 13360 | Joined: 30th Oct 2001 | Posts: 6094

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 2 Pro User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User MacOS User

SuperUser

Rating: +1

Hm, I never had this problem yet, but can imagine it must suck... sad

Chose your people very carefully. Chose people you know you can trust that they do what they said they'd do.

Or use contracts. I never work without contracts with my actors on bigger projects. A contract is important for all parts. Even for the actors too, because if an actor really gives all his blood and time into a project and then it suddenly get stopped because another guy simply disappears, it's not in his best interest either.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 11:09am

Post 4 of 35

Bowie

Force: 1330 | Joined: 11th Nov 2002 | Posts: 208

MacOS User

Gold Member

Rating: +1

I never was able to finish a movie last year. So, I tried guilt, but it didn't work. Now I'm using old shots trying to put together a short movie. Story will be, hmmmm, in the viewers head I guess. You make me wonder what everyone does with old footage. B4, do you include them in the post production? If not, maybe that would keep them excited enough to follow up.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 11:46am

Post 5 of 35

chuter

Force: 350 | Joined: 12th Aug 2003 | Posts: 145

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

i had the same problem recently. i had to shoot a scene with four or five people in it. four turn up on time, but theres allways one who cant be arsed to get up early to film, but instead of phoning to let you know so you can work around it, for some reason decides not to let you know. its frustrating and it caused changes in the story to the film beacause one cast member wasnt there, and i couldnt then send the others home again. whats annoying is you cant have a go at that person, cos you need them in your film so you dont wanna piss them off!
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 11:57am

Post 6 of 35

Andreas

Force: 4943 | Joined: 9th Apr 2002 | Posts: 2657

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 2 Pro User MuzzlePlug User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User MacOS User

SuperUser

Oh, that is the biggest problem for me.. actors! Im having a hard time to find actors to do movies, especilly drama movies.. well, you can threat them and saying you got other actors!
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 12:31pm

Post 7 of 35

Joshua Davies

Force: 25400 | Joined: 21st Mar 2001 | Posts: 3029

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXpreset Maker Windows User MacOS User

FXhome Team Member

Rating: +1

Work with people you don't know if possible. When CSB does stuff we try to work with professional actors or with people who think we are utterly professional - that way they are either professional about the who thing or they think you are and therefore give you a bit more respect.

Friends will be more willing to let you down - but not in a nasty kinda way.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 12:41pm

Post 8 of 35

Simon K Jones

Force: 27955 | Joined: 1st Jan 2002 | Posts: 11683

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker Windows User

FXhome Team Member

Rating: +1

To reiterate what schwar said, often the problem with using friends is that they've seen you develop from your very first dabblings, when it was just a bit of a laugh, and consequently find it hard to take you seriously. They think it's still 'that silly hobby' or the like.

Of course, there are exceptions - friends who are actively as interested in the process as you are, and who have always been 'partners' in your filmmaking. But generally you just have to accept that most of your friends aren't actively interested in filmmaking, and won't share your enthusiasm and dedication. It's through no fault of their own, really...it's just that they have things that are more important to them.

Using people you aren't 'friends' with as such works very well (as long as you pick them carefully, of course), as they don't bring any baggage to the table. That way, they presume you are professional to some degree, and you respect them in the same manner. It can result in a more professional and work-based environment. We experienced this when making the promo video - most of the crew had never met before, and therefore all wanted to prove their worth and show what they could do. As a result, it was the most excellent team I've ever known, turning an impossible shooting schedule into a possibility.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 1:31pm

Post 9 of 35

b4uask30male

Force: 5619 | Joined: 22nd Feb 2002 | Posts: 3497

Windows User

Gold Member

Hi
Just got back from filming ( with only two actors sad i went well but means I need to reshoot scenes.
Those idea's are excellent, I think you have a point about getting them involved, infact I wish I asked this before, because I sent them the script during the week and the people that let me down only had small parts, maybe I should not have showed them the script. ?

A couple of the cast have mentioned that they would like to get involved in the post production so I think i'll involve them ( thanks to you guys )

Fingers crossed it works.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 1:40pm

Post 10 of 35

FroDittyBro

Force: 400 | Joined: 28th May 2003 | Posts: 61

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User

Gold Member

In my movie group I always let my friends do a big piece of somthing like choreography n stuff. If I have already written the script I let them read it before they come over and I tell them to add or take away stuff until we all agree. Then after that there really interested and they come over to shoot it.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 2:51pm

Post 11 of 35

Rawree

Force: 3250 | Joined: 27th Jun 2002 | Posts: 1925

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Heh, at least most of you guys have a crew and some actors. I'm 15 and therefore at the stage where my only realistic options are to get together with friends or do something by myself ("The Test" style?). Unfortunately all my friends are heavily into skateboarding and are of the opinion that making films is "Gay" (I can asure you those are not the types of film that I want to make wink ) I know that other people have this problem and rather than start a new topic i thought I'd just ask for advice here as it's still kinda about crew memer problems (If nobody minds.)

Rawree.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 2:58pm

Post 12 of 35

ssjaaron

Force: 1545 | Joined: 11th Jan 2003 | Posts: 1115

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

my friends are funny, somtimes they would rather go do somthing, but they dont know what, and i allways say, "lets go film somthing" so we make a scrpit and all that good stuff, but somtimes they dont even what to make a movie. frown
then thier are some of my friends that want to film so much they will call me day in and day out. 24-7 just so we can film. and when my friends do that, i love it and take advantage of their willingness to want to make a movie. wink
peace out
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 3:22pm

Post 13 of 35

Pooky

Force: 4834 | Joined: 8th Jul 2003 | Posts: 5913

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

I have the worst kind:

A friend (well not really anymore razz ) that wants to make movies himself. So he always calls me and says like, "Hey can you give me your programs so I can make a movie?" and I say, "No that's illegal you have to buy them. And even if you had them, it doesn't take 10 seconds to learn how to use them." Then he says, "I don't care I want to make a movie!" And I say, "No seriously, it took 6 months for me to get this far, and even then, I'm far from being great.". So he says, "I don't care, I want the programs!". I say, "Do you have at least 111$?". "No." "Well you can't even get the cheapest one then." "Comon give me your programs!" And it starts all over again.

And now he wants to make animated gif movies, so he downloads a gif animation program and then comes to me saying, "What do I do? Why isn't there a Stick Death movie button where I can move the guys? And there isn't any sound, what do I do?".

...... you get the picture.

ANYWAY, back to the topic smile . That happened to me once and I couldn't finish the darn thing.

Last edited Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 5:02pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 3:30pm

Post 14 of 35

Arktic

Force: 9977 | Joined: 10th Nov 2003 | Posts: 2785

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 2 Pro User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker Windows User MacOS User

SuperUser

Rating: +1

Well, in the past, I've had similar experiences to you b4uask.

So I sat down and though - what makes all my friends come out of their houses? And then it hit me - a trip down the pub! If you promise all the actors/crew that you will take them out for a drink afterwards, you'll have a cast who are as eager to get everything filmed as you are!

One note though, make sure the pub is *after* the filming. Otherwise you end up with a lot of rubbish footage.....

Cheers,
Arktic.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 6:18pm

Post 15 of 35

JohnCarter

Force: 3295 | Joined: 11th Mar 2003 | Posts: 1078

VisionLab User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Rating: +1

Arktic sugestion is one i also use... Although bars here are expensive, especially if you have to buy beers for everybody. What I usually buy a pack of 24 beers, some munchie and we make a "wrap" party after the shoot. Motivates most people. And costs me at least a hundred times less than going to the pub with the whole cast and crew...

Buying them lunch also helps - especially if it's good food.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 6:57pm

Post 16 of 35

b4uask30male

Force: 5619 | Joined: 22nd Feb 2002 | Posts: 3497

Windows User

Gold Member

Hmmm
I think you hit the nail on the head there.
I used to get the wife to get the food in for the actors.
But now as we only shoot for a few hours I don't bother.

So that's why the lazy so called actors don't turn up :&rt; filthy little hobbits :&rt;
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 7:08pm

Post 17 of 35

Gibs

Force: 1663 | Joined: 21st May 2002 | Posts: 1611

CompositeLab Pro User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Hmm...I'm not sure if this helps, but I experienced firsthand that it works. The first day we filmed for a movie at school, everyone was jacking around and complaining about how I was doing things. But then I took home the footage, edited it, and threw in a temporary music track. When I showed it to everyone the next day, they all loved it, and were behind me for the rest of the two week shoot.

I guess what this is saying is to show them what's going on. Most people will have no idea how the movie is coming out, but if you can prove to them that you are working hard and it will be good, then maybe they will be willing to work harder.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 8:55pm

Post 18 of 35

Rawree

Force: 3250 | Joined: 27th Jun 2002 | Posts: 1925

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Get hold of a large scaffolding pole, label it "The beating stick" and then when you go to round up late-comers for filming tap it menacingly into the plam of your hand. Problem solved, they'll never be late again (or you'll never see them again because of the restraining order...)

I suppose that this is one of those times when having a small crew (i.e Twisted Studios) really pays off.
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 8:57pm

Post 19 of 35

stqagehanduk

Force: 460 | Joined: 3rd Jun 2002 | Posts: 438

Gold Member

Join an amatuer theatre group and do at least one show with them. You'll learn a lot in the process and meet people who interested in the process - and beleive me, from an actors point of veiw, the effort of shooting a film is nothing as compared to rehearsing and performing a play ,,,
Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 9:00pm

Post 20 of 35

JohnCarter

Force: 3295 | Joined: 11th Mar 2003 | Posts: 1078

VisionLab User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Rating: +1

b4uask30male wrote:

Hmmm
I think you hit the nail on the head there.
I used to get the wife to get the food in for the actors.
But now as we only shoot for a few hours I don't bother.

So that's why the lazy so called actors don't turn up :&rt; filthy little hobbits :&rt;
You will never find a person who has as much dedication as you to make the film unless he makes films himself (or herself)... So you need to provide incentive for them. If they don't want to act for a living, chances are they need something else to be motivated. Like beer if they are guys... Or food. In any case, you ask people to work for free. Giving a little something (like food or beer) doesn't hurt much financially, keeps the morale high and people don't feel abused/exploited as much (especially if they don't have a big part and don't get to do much). Remember that while the director is busy, the actors spend most of their time waiting...

And for some reason, people tend to assume you'll be fine without them since they have such a small part...

Last edited Mon, 23rd Feb 2004, 3:55am; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Sun, 22nd Feb 2004, 11:12pm

Post 21 of 35

Slick

Force: 1140 | Joined: 20th Jul 2003 | Posts: 924

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User

Gold Member

B4uask - Offer the actors something in return it dosent have to be money perhaps something like the others said take them to a pub.

Another thing you will want to do is give them a chance to actually make an inpact on the move itself not just act in it. Let them suggest what to change in the script and stuff like that but watch out dont let them get too creative or else they will turn your idea into crap and start arguing ( I have first hand experiance ). You could also give them a chance at something else other than acting perhaps let some of the actors direct the movie for a couple of shots while you jump in there and act! Let them have some fun dont bore them to death telling them what to do wink.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Feb 2004, 4:23am

Post 22 of 35

er-no

Force: 9531 | Joined: 24th Sep 2002 | Posts: 3964

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 2 Pro User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User MacOS User

SuperUser

b4uask30male wrote:

Hmmm
I think you hit the nail on the head there.
I used to get the wife to get the food in for the actors.
But now as we only shoot for a few hours I don't bother.

So that's why the lazy so called actors don't turn up :&rt; filthy little hobbits :&rt;
Yeah but Ian! Those sandwiches were really nice biggrin
Posted: Tue, 24th Feb 2004, 4:44pm

Post 23 of 35

Frozenpede

Force: 630 | Joined: 28th Jan 2004 | Posts: 1113

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User

Gold Member

Yeah, I have this problem sometimes. What I do is I tell them all that we are going to make a fantasy (its the only genre they deam cool enough after LOTR) these NEVER turn out right but it keeps them involvedin movie making. Basically what Im saying is to cater to them and their ideas even if it can never work and then you will have their attention for future movies biggrin
Posted: Sat, 28th Feb 2004, 4:58pm

Post 24 of 35

Two Gunned Saint

Force: 918 | Joined: 1st Sep 2002 | Posts: 1269

Member

I think it was me, who posted this topic about a year ago. (Ooh I feel special) since then we've had little problem getting actors.

The least reliable person the guy who inspired my previous topic (we must have spent well over 24 hours waiting got him) we started talking about it more, I've given him some cooler stuff, I let him work on the music and told him that we may get it shown in the cinema. Since, he's been very reliable and even turned up early once. The lead actor still turns up all the time as does the lead actress (she also turns up early everytime too.) All the other actors are improving just 'cos my attitudes changed it's more laid back and we muck about more in between set-ups.

A clever trick is getting the unreliable actors scenes planned out perfectly so you know exactly what you need to do, you set the place up where you're going to shoot before hand, including camera and tripod and lighting. Then they turn up and wham straight away you're flying, you get it all wrapped as quickly and painlessly as is possible, then you go out later and do stoopid stuff, which is what my actor's are into. That makes it seem like less of a chore if they don't have to sit there waiting for half an hour while you lie on the floor with the camera trying to get the shot perfect. So when they leave they think "that was kinda fun and easy and slightly satisfying to get that footage" so when you call 'em back for the rest of their stuff they're more enthusiastic.

Also that whole Idea with the beer and food may backfire. 'cos they'll be really anxious to get down the pub and loose interest, and if there's beer in the house, they may find it before hand and cancel filming for you. Unless you want to tell them "no booze, till where done filming" but then they'll think you're a mulehole and will revolt and not bother turning up again.

My main problem is that everyone has work and have limited time, sometimes I'll arrange filming after/during college 'cos then I've got a bunch of actors ready and waiting.

I'll finish now.
Posted: Sat, 28th Feb 2004, 5:23pm

Post 25 of 35

Mellifluous

Force: 5604 | Joined: 6th Oct 2002 | Posts: 3782

EffectsLab Pro User Windows User

Gold Member

All I can say is be grateful for your friends helping out. I know it's really annoying when people don't turn up & disrupts the whole shoot.

I tell my actors that they're helping me to help them. I'm going to be famous (ha) & so I'm going to drag them with me.

Today, I've just had a couple of great uni students be at my beck & call for the past 6 hours, doing what I want when I want (even a bedroom scene).

You can't expect everything to go ok all the time though, I'm expecting something to go wrong somewhere, but take it as it comes.

But if there are some people who are consistently late, or consistently don't turn up at all, then just get some other people in their stead. Last film I made, I just approached a gorgeous girl on the street & asked her to be in it, & she said yes (it was a drama, not a racy film...if that's what you're thinking!)
Posted: Sat, 28th Feb 2004, 6:07pm

Post 26 of 35

b4uask30male

Force: 5619 | Joined: 22nd Feb 2002 | Posts: 3497

Windows User

Gold Member

Hehehe

Tried those tricks guys, and the "£$"£$ canceled this morning ( the day we planned to shot, )
I think the worst thing is for the last 3 weeks everyone canceled via a email or pm sad
No matter how many times i've asked them to call or let me know the day before, not on the day. sad

That's it i'm sticking to poser films.
Posted: Fri, 5th Mar 2004, 3:10pm

Post 27 of 35

tatooine69

Force: 400 | Joined: 24th Oct 2003 | Posts: 1

Gold Member

I've found that relying on most of my friends for help with movies is a waste of time. Half the time, they don't show up, and when they do, they aren't that motivated anyway. I would suggest perhaps checking out local colleges. Almost every school offers some sort of acting class. Chances are, anyone taking an acting class will be more motivated and reliable. Thats what I did, and it has worked out really well so far.
Posted: Fri, 5th Mar 2004, 4:11pm

Post 28 of 35

AndrewtheActorMan

Force: 1859 | Joined: 31st May 2003 | Posts: 1477

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Ah, this brings me back to Christmas Cheer.

Nobody except some of the members who were sorta in on the project know what i am talking about probably...

OK, advice from an actor.

Personally, I love to act, and do theatre. If i get a chance at doing something that sounds good, I do it. Currently I am envolved in 3 projects, maybe even 4 depending on how stuff goes. For Christmas Cheer, I went out on a weekend, got some wood and paint, and some old boxes and pipes, some stuff that was getting thrown out, and made a set for one of the last scenes that needed filming. I spent maybe 6 hours on the thing as a whole. I had some friends who were going to be in the scene with the addition to my mom. heh, yes, my mom. When it came close to ''shooting day'', it didn't happen. We had lined it all up, I had everything setup, and people were going out of town or just forgot. I was there by myself, with my camera, boom, and a nice set that I had spent my weekend building.

I was planning on making a 'directors cameo' in the scene, so I was allready to go. The project never was finished, and probably never will be finished. Anyway, to get to the point... GET ACTORS! Either get proffesional actors, or get friends who want to make it big. You just have to curve it to your friends a bit. Say, "This movie has the potential to make it big" and tell them where it is going. On the internet site that gets thousands of hits a day. Surely, if that doesn't intrique them, get someone else. The idea of going to a theatre group and doing a project is one of the best ideas i have heard, along with the pub one biggrin . You don't really have to do a production with them, just go around the theatre, and see who you can talk to. You can probably get something going.

You really gotta find people who are honestly into the production & acting.

Good luck with feature films B4! Let me know if you need anything else biggrin


Oh! And please, try not to sack the actors, and have bad opinions of them wink

Andrew biggrin
Posted: Fri, 5th Mar 2004, 10:38pm

Post 29 of 35

Gibs

Force: 1663 | Joined: 21st May 2002 | Posts: 1611

CompositeLab Pro User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

One thing I've found to work pretty well when I'm with my friends is to let them in on the process a bit. Make the filming fun. If they want to goof of a bit in front of the camera, or do staged bloopers, let them, and have fun to. But don't get too far off track, or else you'll get nothing done.

Also, if they have ideas about how the scene or shot should be done, listen to them, and try it out. They're not going to like it if everytime they give an idea, you shoot it down. This doesn't mean you'll have to use it, but at least they'll get the satisfaction of helping out.

A few days ago, I was shooting a school project, and the actor had to walk in front of the trashcan and throw a piece of paper in it. He started out throwing it over his shoulder, which was not how I wanted it done, but I let him, and it was fun to do. Then we shot it the way I wanted, and moved on.

So I guess what I'm trying to say is to let them have fun and contribute, even if it does slow the filming down a bit.
Posted: Fri, 5th Mar 2004, 10:50pm

Post 30 of 35

FiveIronFrenzy

Force: 464 | Joined: 25th Dec 2003 | Posts: 438

Windows User

Gold Member

WoW! What was weird, the must be very lazy. Most actors would be happy to be in something that had to do with film!

neutral Nathan
Posted: Sat, 6th Mar 2004, 12:51am

Post 31 of 35

AndrewtheActorMan

Force: 1859 | Joined: 31st May 2003 | Posts: 1477

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

You would think...

just depends what 'film' your talking about


Andrew biggrin
Posted: Sat, 6th Mar 2004, 3:51am

Post 32 of 35

Evman

Force: 4382 | Joined: 25th Jan 2004 | Posts: 3609

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Yep, i have the same problem as all of you. My friends just want to get it done. They don't understand movies and when i say we have to reshoot that, they don't want to. Or if we need to shoot from other angles... "No its fine" then of course an action scene is one long shot and is not fast paced at all...
Posted: Mon, 8th Mar 2004, 1:58am

Post 33 of 35

cdolsen

Force: 710 | Joined: 16th Jun 2002 | Posts: 206

EffectsLab Lite User

Gold Member

i've never cast a friend in a key position the first or second times i shoot. if they're decicated after the second shoot then i'll use them. i also use actors from colleges, local stage groups and such since there going to do this for a career. hope this helps.
Posted: Fri, 12th Mar 2004, 1:47am

Post 34 of 35

brendanf

Force: 400 | Joined: 8th Jan 2004 | Posts: 42

EffectsLab Lite User

Gold Member

I find the best way to keep actors attention is to make them feel included from the start. You need to make them feel important and crucial to the films success. You must let them know that their character builds the film. We all know that there are many types of people that come into play when making movies(or at least with me). The most common negative actors I have seen are:
1. The unconcentrating person: this one annoys me the most. Whenever the camera turns off, they start talking about other things and start laughing and skrewing around. Solution: give them a job at all times. Either have them hold something, record the shot, adjust the scene, etc.
2. The Lazy person: this is the person that constantly is complaining about how bad the movie is or how bored they are. They only distract people and make the process seem worse. They whine when they are asked to do something. Solution: make their role, sound like the most important thing. Exaggerate the character and make him seem superior.

Just thought I post my ideas. Like I said, I think the best way is to include people from the start so they become attached to the film's plot. Inform them of the shooting ASAP.
Posted: Fri, 12th Mar 2004, 2:02am

Post 35 of 35

Gibs

Force: 1663 | Joined: 21st May 2002 | Posts: 1611

CompositeLab Pro User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Good advice. I run into number 1 a lot, but it doesn't put me off too much. Actually, I kind of like it, in a way, because the actors stay occupied while I set up the next shot, and I can perfect it without them being bored to death. It's not too much of a problem as long as they don't run off or anything.