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video quality and film look

Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 1:29pm

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directorshock

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how can you get that film look you see at the movies.
also is there any tutorials on transfering video from DV to the computer.
how can you get the highest possible quality. many times the video looks choppy.

thanks
J Colon
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 1:32pm

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Serpent

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Well, the "film look" is just simply color correcting. And tutorials? Just get a good firewire, plug it in, and then hit import video.
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 1:33pm

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Aculag

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Tutorial on how to transfer from the camera:

1. Plug camera into computer via firewire port.
2. Use NLE to capture footage.

To achieve "Film Look" Like you see at the movies:

1. Shoot your movie on film.

To answer all of these questions and more:

Search The Forums
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 1:52pm

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simon603

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As Serpent and Aculag said the "Film Look" you see on films is Colour Correction where an Online Editor has sat and gone through every shot of the film and played with the colours untill they reached something which the director/editor were happy with.

There is no easy way of doing this but with sony's Vegas 5.0 when you buy it you get some bonus software called Magic Bullet Movie Looks by red giant software which has a load of preset which u can chose from to achieve the Film Look with a press of a button. I have never used this software tho so i don't know how well it works.
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 2:21pm

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Simon K Jones

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directorshock wrote:

how can you get that film look you see at the movies.
Which film look?

Saving Private Ryan? Three Kings? Lord of the Rings? Metropolis? American Pie? Minority Report? Evil Dead?

There's no such thing as 'the film look', as every film uses different stock and developing/grading procedures. What you're referring to is probably the on-set lighting, which is the single most defining factor in terms of the 'film look' - ie, making it look professional.

So to achieve a 'film look':

1. Light your film carefully.
2. Make sure you set up the camera correctly and that your camera movements are high quality.
3. Grade the footage in post-production.

Our forthcoming program DigiGrade will be able to do sophisticated grading for just £49.99.

also is there any tutorials on transfering video from DV to the computer.
Your editing program should have information on that. It's a relatively simple matter of just plugging in the camera and then using the capture system in the editing program.

how can you get the highest possible quality. many times the video looks choppy.
Capturing DV will transfer the video directly from the camera to computer with no loss of quality. Choppyness is likely to be due to your computer being too slow to play the video in real-time - the information is all there, it just can't be played fast enough. That isn't usually a problem with DV, though. What spec system do you have?
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 2:21pm

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CMBmovies

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Hi, I used magic bullet along with colour correction tools as one of the steps to to get the 'look' i'm aiming for with my catwoman film-

http://fxhome.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=14062

Take a look and see what you think.

What type of movie are you making and what kind of look are you going for?
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 4:43pm

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terrytate

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Why are After Effects and Magic Bullet suite so feckin expensive?!

I think Adobe should rethink their strategy and start handing out copies of AE to anyone that has bought Premiere, that'd be about fair...
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 5:04pm

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CMBmovies

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I dont' think there THAT expensive for what they are.


If your into making videos as a hobby then I can see your point but if your getting into it seriously and presumably your spending money on a decent camera compared to that you could get the full adobe suite for the price of a cheap camera

Last edited Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 7:29pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 5:15pm

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billy3d

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Aftereffects 6.5 has intergrated Colour Finnese, which is awsome and is highly reputed. The Probundle @ student prices is not that "fecking expesive"
Magic Bullet is really good, but render times are the majob problem.
Tarn: Did American Pie have a look? If so i neeed to know what it was?
Posted: Mon, 21st Jun 2004, 5:19pm

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simon603

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The prices for Video editting software packages can seem like a lot for an ameutuer film maker but u can find them for cheaper.

You can either buy a education edition from some computer shops which u made need to supply proof of being a student.

The other option is to look on ebay where they can be quite cheap, the unopened boxs can still be £200 +, which is still quite expensive. There are people selling copies of the software which i wouldn't reckomend as they aren't garenteed to work or anything. The best thing to look for is 2nd hand software where someone has used it registered the software and no longer needs it. Its the full working software just it has been registered for someone else, i've seen these quite often go for less than £50.
Posted: Wed, 23rd Jun 2004, 10:30am

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theone

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by adding more contrast and less color, you would help it to get a touch of film. sollthar wrote a tutorial on this somewhere in the forum .
i would post the link if i could find it.
Posted: Wed, 23rd Jun 2004, 10:49am

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Simon K Jones

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billy3d wrote:

Tarn: Did American Pie have a look?
I believe it did. Maybe you went to a special soundtrack-only version?
Posted: Wed, 23rd Jun 2004, 11:49am

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Brettsta

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Now that we are talking about film look, I want to film a scene and its suppose to be night. Should I grade it for it to be night or film with the main lights off, and an external light on what Im filming.
Posted: Wed, 23rd Jun 2004, 2:25pm

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otteypm

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I know everyone seems to love their day for night, and if you don't have access to power or decent portable lights then it can be the only option.

But I prefer to shoot in the dark with artificial light, the important thing to do here is make sure the light sources are justified, Desire To Kill in the cinema section had two night scenes, one outside a cafe at night, it was lit with the street lights and two 100w portable lights, the apparent light sources obviously being the street lamps ( the extra lights were used as the street lamps alone weren't enough) A second scene is set in a grave yard at night, the justification for the light setup here was the moonlight and lightning strikes. It was lit with two 800w lamps and a 500w lamp, the footage was then graded to appear more blue, and to create the lightning. Blue filters were tried on the lights but they looked crap....
Posted: Wed, 23rd Jun 2004, 5:29pm

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BorAx

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There is a nice little Plugin for Premiere which is called "Easy Movie Colors".

With this Plugin you can modify the colors, grain and 16:9 borders. It is about 25 €

The only thing you maybe do not like is, that the plugin is in German. But however, here's the link: http://www.videox.de/emcd/index.html

There you have also the possibility of downloading a demo-version.

Hope, that could help.
Posted: Thu, 24th Jun 2004, 2:06pm

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vilhelm nielsen

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try this:
http://www.bigfx.com/frames.htm

there is a demo version of it and it's pretty good biggrin
Posted: Thu, 24th Jun 2004, 2:42pm

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Klown

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Here's an interesting method I read about in a magazine not too long ago.

For After Effects..

Import your footage twice. This is critical, you can't just duplicate within the program, because you will be interpreting the footage differently.

Right click on one of your imported clips, go to "interpret footage" and choose "upper field first". Click the motion detect box right below it as well.

Do the same with the second imported clip, except choose lower field first. Click the motion detect box as well.

Place both clips on the time line over top of each over, make sure to put the one interpreted with upper field first on top.

Set the opacity of the top clip to about 50% (you can experiment, 75% opacity will give more motion blur, but it may be too much)

For both clips, add effect/video/reduce interlace flicker. Choose a value of 1, but again, you can experiment.

Make sure frame blending is enabled for both clips (put a check under little icon that looks like film)

export it, make sure field render is set to off, and frame blending is set to on for selected layers.

This is supposed to add a softening motion blur type effect you see in film, to reduce the overly sharp look of video. I've had good results with it, you can even experiment using 24fps (23.976) if you're using NTSC footage.

Hope this helps

- Steve
Posted: Fri, 25th Jun 2004, 7:56pm

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Gibs

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Brettsta wrote:

Now that we are talking about film look, I want to film a scene and its suppose to be night. Should I grade it for it to be night or film with the main lights off, and an external light on what Im filming.
It really depends. For some stuff, day for night works fine. If you want the blueish look, I suggest doing it. Just try to film when it's cloudy, and don't show too much of the sky. This is an image that I did day for night on.

However, lighting at night works good for close and medium shots. I suggest just doing some tests and seeing what you like best.
Posted: Sat, 26th Jun 2004, 2:34am

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Kaede11

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This is like the 50th topic on film look and I kind of got angry- I read only the first post so I want to state my position. I would to the death Battle everyone with an iron sword that it's not the "Film look" or how many filters, tricks, color reduction, or lighting that makes a good film. Of course look helps but you can make a good film with a grainy ass camera. It's not how the film "looks" it's what you do with it
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:02am

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Gibs

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I agree totally.

But there's nothing wrong with trying to make your footage look more film-like also. smile
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:05am

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Ryan

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One thing I did that made one of my movies look more "profesional" was to change the aspect ratio. In other words add black bars at the top and bottom.
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:09am

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Serpent

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Er, can a moderator please close this topic, it's old, annoying, and has been answered in every way possible from every angle and aspect.

EDIT: Cool! that post was 411, take the hint. wink
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:12am

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Ryan

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Serpent wrote:

Er, can a moderator please close this topic, it's old, annoying, and has been answered in every way possible from every angle and aspect.

EDIT: Cool! that post was 411, take the hint. wink
Um, the most people that could have had a part inthis up to now is 21 and at FXHome there are 16,000 members, so if someone had something to add then they will have to start a new thread which would be even more annoying to some people.
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:14am

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Serpent

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Dude, there have been so many topics about this subject, and I think the most that can be said has been said.

And, this guy hasn't responded, so his question has probably been answered, he has only had one post and is probably color correcting his movie as we speak.
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:46am

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Gibs

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But why bother closing it? It's certainly not doing any harm.
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:47am

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Serpent

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I guess not, just annoying, IMO, to have all the said 9 times before.
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 7:22am

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billy3d

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erm i think your mistaken tarn, i watched the dvd, so just tell me what was the look ? wink
Posted: Sun, 27th Jun 2004, 2:09pm

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Simon K Jones

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As far as I am aware, they had a cinematographer, who chose the cameras and lenses and set up each scene and lit everything appropriately.

Just because a film doesn't have some crazy over-stylised gimmicky appearance doesn't mean it doesn't have a 'look', billy. American Pie isn't about flashy visuals: it's about getting visuals that aid the story and the comedy. But that still requires technical skill - you can't just point the camera and click 'record'.
Posted: Mon, 28th Jun 2004, 2:05am

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Cutty201

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I disagree with Kaede a lil, I definately think shooting on Film is definately a different look. I looks...like film.. smile more colorful at least, but in the end it's what you do with your footage.

I say this because I am gonna buy a camera and shoot on film for the first time evar. I saw a demo video and fell in love smile It's exactly how I want my stuff to look smile So I am gonna mess around I am gonna grab my Video Camera and when I get the film camera and shoot everything with both of em and i'll post the results when I do it.
Posted: Mon, 28th Jun 2004, 2:12am

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Aculag

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I don't know why you'd want to shoot on 8mm film, Cutty. Other than just something fun/nostalgic. Your video camera is going to look much better, I imagine. I've wanted to shoot something on 8mm, but not because I think it looks better than video. It's just something different to try.
Posted: Mon, 28th Jun 2004, 9:15am

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billy3d

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actually i do know "Just because a film doesn't have some crazy over-stylised gimmicky appearance doesn't mean it doesn't have a 'look'", i was just asking what the look was? ex, it varied from location to location in LOTR, the matrix has a green ting.

Some Basic techniques are like:
adding contrast will envoke excitement.

giving an overall colour tone will set the mood. Like red for some really intense seq's, or for showing heat and warmth, green for kinda peacefull look. Blue for like a happy look or a cold look. You can even cleverly use colours to show happiness, anger, suffering etc depending on your needs.

you can also hightlight with brighten it up, give it a glow, streaked outline etc to, to focus on that object or person or made the viewer show more attention to that object or thing.

Desaturating the image, beacuse video cams pic up too much colour.

Modifing the colour to show the location, for eg, you cant have a blue tint during the daytime in a desert!

billy3d
Posted: Mon, 28th Jun 2004, 9:38am

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Simon K Jones

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billy3d wrote:

Modifing the colour to show the location, for eg, you cant have a blue tint during the daytime in a desert!
Why not? If it suits the film, then it's perfectly legitimate. You don't always have to go for the obvious option - a blue tint in such a situation might reflect the current mood of the film: it doesn't have to always represent reality. Plus you can use it to unnerve the audience or make a place seem alien, as in Pitch Black.
Posted: Mon, 28th Jun 2004, 10:16am

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billy3d

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that would be a visualeffect, thats why i gave this example "Modifing the colour to show the location, for eg, you cant have a blue tint during the daytime in a desert!" for changing colour to show the location
Posted: Mon, 28th Jun 2004, 6:59pm

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Cutty201

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Aculag wrote:

I don't know why you'd want to shoot on 8mm film, Cutty. Other than just something fun/nostalgic. Your video camera is going to look much better, I imagine. I've wanted to shoot something on 8mm, but not because I think it looks better than video. It's just something different to try.
have ya been to www.pro8mm.com ? Take a look at their demo video, I am in love with it smile TO use their slogan "Forget everything you thought about traditional Super8 Film." I am guessing you know about them but just to further everyone's info on them, what tehy do is cut up and rework 35mm Film Stocks (the kind Hollywood uses smile) and reengineer it into a Super8 Film cartridge. then They have a special way of processing and developing it that brings out the MOST color. The downside (sorta) is you cannot project the film via a super8 projector, it HAS to be transferred to DV or some other medium (which they do for you). They used Pro8mm in "Varsity Blues" for all the football game footage (I think thats what tehy used it for, I KNOW it was used in Varsity Blues) also Neil Young's latest documentary was shot entirely on Pro8.