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Movie light

Posted: Fri, 10th Sep 2004, 3:59pm

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Absolut

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Hi!
Do anyone have a tip on how I can get the DV film to look more like a real movie. I mean ,when you look at a movie on TV, and when you look at what you self have filmed, it looks too real. Not like a movie. I hope you understand what I mean. confused
(I´m using Premiere Pro)

And action / Nix
Posted: Fri, 10th Sep 2004, 8:05pm

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MrShmoe

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Rating: +1

You have to color correct your fottage, I don't know how you do that so someone else have to help you with that.
You could probably search for "color correcting in premiere" on google and you might find a decent tutorial.
Posted: Fri, 10th Sep 2004, 9:51pm

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Andreas

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Its not actully just color correcting your fotage, I try not to do that anymore (couse im lazy, and I learn by this way) and lighten my set properly with lights and do much stuff in camera.

I suggest you just search the forum, the topic has been brought up countless times
Posted: Sat, 11th Sep 2004, 4:52am

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Marek

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Yeah, you're best bet would be to light properly during filming. It goes a long way in making your film ultra rad.

I wrote a tutorial on it a while back over at AFCommunity. Here's a quote:

Marek wrote:

Have you ever made or seen a film where you could obviously tell that it was amateur simply because of the bland uninteresting feel to it? Chances are this was mostly because of lighting. There are three main topics that will be addressed in the following guide, and they are:

  • Uses of light in a film.
  • Three-Point Lighting
  • Color and Temperature


-----------------------------
Uses of light in a film
-----------------------------

The most common and obvious use of light is to make sure the actor(s) or object(s) in a scene are visible at all times. In the same way you can tell most television shows from movies, you can tell home videos from well-lit amateur films. It all has to do with the lighting.
When broadcasting companies make a television show, they have a limited amount of time to make a set amount of episodes. What would you do in this situation? Most likely you would set up the lighting to work from every angle, that way you could have more than one camera rolling at the same time, to save time and ultimately money. This is exactly what they use in television. In the same fashion, most beginning filmmakers don't light properly or more than likely, not at all. They simply run out with their camera and a few friends, shoot a few takes only to wonder why it doesn't look even close to professional when they play it back.
When dealing with films, they don't have 15 30-minute episodes to spew out within the next 3 months. Since they have plenty of time, they also have enough time to set up lighting that is specific for each shot. Thus, it is easy to detect the difference between film and television.

----------------------------
Three-Point Lighting
----------------------------

Three-Point lighting would be your basic lighting setup for almost every film. You pretty much would set it up like this:
Your key light, this light should bring out the actor from the rest of the scene. The ideal placement for your key light would be so that it is in the right place so the shadow cast by the tip of the actor's nose should touch the corner of the actor's mouth. When shooting outdoor scenes, the sun could be the key light.
Your fill light, this light should fill in the shadows cast by the key light. Hence the name - fill light. The fill light should be put on the opposite side of the key light and it should also have a diffuser on it.
Your backlight, this light is mainly to add interest to your subject. It makes the actor stand out more from the background. It should be placed behind the actor.

------------------------------
Color & Temperature
------------------------------
The color of a scene and the temperature the viewer interprets it to be are connected very powerfully. Say, if you wanted to make it seem like it was hot and dusk/dawn you would probably use an orange-ish light. Whereas if you wanted to make it seem cold and dark, you would probably use a dark blue light. It's as simple as that.

Information gathered and inspired from the book 'Real World: Digital Video'
Posted: Sat, 11th Sep 2004, 5:39pm

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Redhawksrymmer

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Rating: +1

Jonne wrote:

You have to color correct your fottage, I don't know how you do that so someone else have to help you with that.
You could probably search for "color correcting in premiere" on google and you might find a decent tutorial.
Use the tool "Color Correcting" in Premiere.
Posted: Sat, 11th Sep 2004, 6:36pm

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rmw

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You have to color correct your fottage
I think you mean digitally grade, because wouldn't color correcting make it look more "real".

Also remember that color on film is usually not as "vibriant" as DV, so the first thing you would want to do is desaturate your footage a bit.

P.S could you please post a screenshot of the footage.