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STAR WARS Unseen Evil: The Clone Of The Chiss

Posted: Wed, 20th Apr 2005, 9:54am

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silencer

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It is a dark time for the Jedi. The Clone Wars have begun and there are rumours that the Jedi are being hunted down and killed by two cloaked figures...

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Posted: Thu, 21st Apr 2005, 11:25pm

Post 2 of 22

Justin10139

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I like this film it had me hooked on it till the end. One of the best StarWars shorts on this site and I have seen. Nice Job and I can't wait till Episode III Comes out.
Posted: Fri, 22nd Apr 2005, 10:21am

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Hendo

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Good job on the production. It looks like a lot of effort went into it.

Nice costumes and an excellent variety of locations (due to presumably everything being filmed against a green/blue screen?), rather than the usual one-location effort, such as the stereotypical Forest Fight Scene (TM), which admittedly your's did have (hehe) but not in a bad way! :-)

The opening sky & mountain terrain shot was a nice touch. Did you use Terragen by any chance?

I also liked the Mos Eisley-style scene (the desert space-port) where there was some nice background movement happening, rather than just a flat background image.

Here are some observations:

* There was a lot of noticeable flickering around the keys of the actors, which distracted and took me away from the story. I had the same problem in my film, and in my case, it was due to a poor blue-screen. To minimise the problem I did some frame-by-frame masking in Chromanator. I'm guessing that the flickering in your film is due to lighting / screen issues.

* In addition to edge-flickering, sometimes there was flickering within the actor's body. E.g. as if the actor had some green in his costume against the green background. (Or vice verca for blue.) One example is at timecode 13:12 to 13:20.

* Some of the spaceship animations looked like they were 2D animations rather than 3D. Did you render spaceship images from a 3D program and then animate them in your NLE or Chromanator? Or were the animations really rendered in your 3D program? If so, maybe it was just down to the MOV compression.

* It appears as if the backgrounds behind the actors were all static images, which made it (more) obvious that the actors were keyed in. Especially the forest scene. It would've been cool if you could have gotten live footage of a forest and keyed the actors over that, or even better, filmed the actors out in a forest.

But those are just my thoughts! :-) It was a great piece of work with obviously a lot of effort, so congrats.

Hendo
Posted: Thu, 28th Apr 2005, 8:13pm

Post 4 of 22

masta oooba

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Rating: +1

I couldn't help but find most of the dialouge and shots to be extremely farmiliar....hmm....maybe it's because you plucked them right out of the Star Wars films themselves.
I'm sorry, but I personally found this to be one of the worst fan films I've seen. But it was the funniest, I'll give you that (especially the ending!! Geniusness! I laughed so hard)

The only thing about this movie that I thought was decent was the lightsaber fighting. Not bad, although some parts are really dull.
The acting was so horribly overdone, that I felt like I was watching a comedy (unless...I was....in which....). The sith actors were trying so hard to be scary that they ended up making me laugh.
The dialouge should not be mentioned (except I think it's really important for people to realize that they should try to be origional, instead of literally taking lines out of the movies theyre emulating. That sort of thing is not cool)...
The green screen was pretty crazy. And by crazy I mean there were all types of strange negative effects going on. In one scene it looks like the characters are holograms (although green screen is hard and takes time, so you can't really expect people to do an amazing job with it). Every single shot looked like there was.... a green screen....involved...probably because there was. Nevermind.
The spaceship special effects were the same as any other Star Wars fan film. Good job with that.

I'm sorry, I tend to be harsh. But this is my true opinion of the movie. Be thankfull that I actually took the time to express how I feel instead of just giving the movie a bad review and leaving (like many people do on FxHome).
Posted: Mon, 2nd May 2005, 12:08am

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jetaimaster

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i love ure production intro sequence
hahahahaha
Posted: Sun, 8th May 2005, 3:40am

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evilmonkey389

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So i've been delving more and more into creating lightsabers. What are some tried and true techniques that you guys use when you make these uber extensive fight sequences, I can't imaging that you edit frame by frame. Does anybody have an alternate approach that works and looks good?
Posted: Sun, 8th May 2005, 7:55am

Post 7 of 22

silencer

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Thanks for all the input guys, its all well recieved even the bad bits wink
As for creating lightsabers, i'm afraid most of the time you have to create them frame by frame! On some lucky ocassions you can miss out a few frames and let the tweening do its stuff (but not often), so unless you have the cash to buy the Master Replica FX sabers and fight very carefully!! you have to create them by hand smile

Silencer
Posted: Thu, 12th May 2005, 9:29pm

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david regenthal

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I might have preferred a 16x9 format and the audio could use a little tweaking, but I found it most enjoyable (which really is the bottom line). You must have put a lot of time & effort into this--nice work. Best fan film I have seen in recent memory . . . more, more!!! smile
Posted: Thu, 12th May 2005, 10:34pm

Post 9 of 22

dnwalkup

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Okay, first of all, as a fan film, this was not too bad. I was actually suprised at some of the composite shots.

For an overall film, I give it 1 out of 5. The acting was bad. Really bad. The main Jedi I don't have too many complaints about, especially because there was a need for him to be able to perform martial arts. Recommendation: Post at local colleges around the theatre that you're doing a independent film on DV. You will get a lot of response and decent actors willing to do your film for free as long as they get a copy of it for their reel.

The Light saber fights left a lot to be desired.

Composite shots we're horrible in some places and not too bad in others.

The script needed story and character work.

The Cinematography needed lots of help. Depth of Feild, Shot Composition, etc.

I really don't mean to be over critical, even though I am being WAY over critical. It was good for some of the fanfilms I've seen. Filmmaking is not an easy thing to do.

Drew
drewbond07@hotmail.com
Posted: Fri, 13th May 2005, 5:42pm

Post 10 of 22

The video machine

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It would be nice, just out of interest, to find out what movies you have created... I don't mean to be rude but if you can't practice what you preach, then don't put people down instantly, I know you may well have been trying to be construstive but it's just straight rude! Also, the actors, Ibelive, are a dramatics company anyway, so that's just insulting.

I've already given my 2 cents on the filmmakers forum so there's no point in repeating myself.
4/5
Posted: Fri, 13th May 2005, 7:36pm

Post 11 of 22

silencer

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Thanks video, i don't mind if some people don't like it most of the comments are true we just didn't have the time to finish everything the way we wanted to. On the acting front, again we were rushed and we are in fact all professional actors lol, we were the cast of Joseph and the amazinf technicolor dreamcoat at the New London Theatre in Londons west end lol i've been a professional actor for 9yrs mostly musical theatre but i'm moving into TV. Check out the website a fan created for me

http://www.freewebs.com/carlghughes/

Anyway everyone has their own way of looking at things smile

Thanks again
Posted: Sat, 14th May 2005, 10:08am

Post 12 of 22

dnwalkup

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I understand that I was quite forward with my feelings on the film, however, I feel that sugar coating the facts, or only giving priase and no criticism is a bad path to take. There is no growth there.

Finding out that the actors are all professionals is very interesting to me. I feel that the art is a very universal one, however, I am from California, so it may just be that the style I was taught is completely different.

Also, I would love criticism of my films. Obviously one excells more and more at one's craft the more one practices the craft. If you'd like so see the work of myself and my partners in crime go to http://www.idlemindproductions.com Check out the films section and then start a new topic on the message board with your thoughts. Rip them apart. Our art is so delicate that there is a very fine line between Amature and Avant Garde, and a huge line between either of those and Professional, "hollywood" if you will, quality. I can say with no shame that my films are far from Professional or Avant Garde.

Drew
Posted: Sun, 15th May 2005, 10:44pm

Post 13 of 22

RudyPicardo

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Rating: +1

Carl:

First and foremost, I've watched this movie several times merely because I was facinated in your green screen work. I just learned some of the basics of green screen and compositing during post-production. I gave your movie a 3, but I think its more towards a 3.5 or 3.7. In addition, I'd like to share some suggestions (some of which can be easily done in post production with Chormanator or the 3D program you used).

I thought the fact you tried to do the entire movie just with green screen was very ambitious. That effort alone deserved a 3 because I know how tricky green screening is. I won't comment on how good or bad the acting was merely because I really don't have much expertise on the matter. I will say that the quality of the costumes was excellent - my compliments to your costume designer. I also thought some of your CG models and backgrounds were really good too. The lighting for your actors is pretty solid.

And I really like the parts where you have the video communicator, espically at the 04:03 mark of your film - that in my opinion, is probably your most professional looking shot. I wouldn't mind any tips in how you achived this shot.

I looked at your profile and noticed you haven't purchased Effects Lab, yet. I've just started experimenting with it this weekend. Let me say that as an editor, it is really a solid program. Some of the problems I saw with the light saber special effects of video can be easily solved just by using Effects Lab. (As a note Carl, your problems are very similar to my problems if you ever wanted to waste a few minutes of your time and see a few of my submissions. So I can totally relate).

Most of my suggestions are based on my own experiences learning Chromanator, After Effects, and Maya 6 in the past few months. In addition, most of the suggestions are based on creating some better depth of field shots or movement within your green screen work. I've put a sample of an unfinished project that is currently in development to help illustrate my point:

http://www.rudypicardo.com/video/Maya/OfficeScene1.mov

If you look at the 00:33;00 - 00:35;00 section of the sample above, you'll see that I tried to make my backgrounds move a bit and made them slightly blurry in an attempt to create a better depth in my shot. Next in the section 01:04;00 - 01:07;11, I tried to used After Effects (where you can use Chromanator) to again create both movement and depth. What makes the second example different is that there are technically 3 layers and thus I'm compositing twice - the third layer is the object in the foreground moving up, next are my two talents talking, then the background is a wall moving down (note its the opposite direction as my foreground object). I think you can easily improve on you movie just by trying to create more depths of field shots when using Chromanator.

Now when looking at your video, if you compare the shots at 08:40 and 9:10, the depth of field is pretty good, as the background is somewhat blurry. At the 06:45 mark in your movie, I know you did a pretty good job of creating a depth of field by adding the extras in the background, but it seems like the background should be a bit more blurrier; your actors should be the ones in focus instead of both the actors and the background of dantooine/tatooine.

In some of your dialog sequences, it looks like you only had one actor at a time, and you had to shoot each part separately on green screen then edit the whole thing together. I mention this because you can create some better depth of field shots if you had some over the shoulder shots. However, if you only had one of your actors/talents available at one time, I understand that this is impossible. I know you had a few of them such as the one at the 16:00 and 16:31 marks of your film. Having these types of shots gives you a better depth of field.

Also, don't hesitate to shoot extreme close-ups, whether action or during dialog. The landscapes you have in the background in your shots are exceptional, but never underestimate the landscape of a person's face, especially during dialoge sequences.. I know you have some solid close-ups for most of the film, but don't hesistate to frame some of your shots between the forehead and neck during dialog sections. BTW ~ Its a shame you killed off the lead actress in this movie. She obviously has a beautiful face and I hope you'll be working with her again on a future project.

Another good example for a good close-up would be when your main actor grabs back his saber at the 17:26 mark of your video. I think it would have been better if you did a close-up of his hands as he's grabbing the saber then cutting back to the wide shot you have. Its evident that your actor has some martial arts or gymnastics skills and I completely understand that you want to keep your wide shots to appreciate his form. Also consider that having some good close-ups will also add some good erractic action to the sequence. Finally, and assuming you haven't done this, also consider speeding up a few of the action shots. I typically use 110% - 140% depending on how I feel how fast it should be.

Carl, I think as your first submission, this is a fantastic effort; I never would have tried something this ambitious as one of my first submissions.

And as a person who is learning how to incorporate CG and green screenwork, I respect your this work. I hope a few of these comments will help and you don't mind my criticism. I enjoyed watching it and studying it and look forward to seeing what you do next.
Posted: Mon, 16th May 2005, 7:26am

Post 14 of 22

silencer

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From one Carl to another your comments were greatly recieved. I really appreciate your critique and i had most of the same thoughts but mostly because of time restraints and lack of experience i couldn't make what was in my head appear on the screen smile I hope in our next project you see a massive increase in professionalism.

Thanks again for your great comments

Carl
Posted: Sun, 31st Jul 2005, 2:11am

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gUnit

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real bad. i didnt like it at all...u guys could have put more of an effort into the bluescreening, but not bad, nonetheless.

gUnit
Posted: Sun, 31st Jul 2005, 2:12am

Post 16 of 22

gUnit

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real bad. i didnt like it at all...u guys could have put more of an effort into the bluescreening, but not bad, nonetheless.

gUnit
Posted: Sun, 31st Jul 2005, 2:34am

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Serpent

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gUnit wrote:

real bad. i didnt like it at all...u guys could have put more of an effort into the bluescreening, but not bad, nonetheless.

gUnit
Wait, wait wait, what? "Real bad, not bad." Make up your mind. And that isn't very good constructive criticism in the first place. And I think the effort on bluescreening wasn't where it was lacking. They probably didn't have the most time or the best equipment for the job. More time should be put into story and stuff like that. The story was alright and acting was great. But I have said my part months ago.
Posted: Sun, 31st Jul 2005, 2:34am

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Pooky

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gUnit wrote:

real bad. i didnt like it at all

gUnit wrote:

but not bad, nonetheless.
... cunning biggrin
Posted: Tue, 2nd Aug 2005, 7:36am

Post 19 of 22

silencer

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Hi all

No we didn't have the right equipment for green-screening. We filmed the whole movie in the foyer of the New London Theatre in between shows as we were the cast of joseph at the time. We only had some green fabric 12' x 12' and 2 floresent working lights which wasn't enough. It is quite frustrating watching the finished piece knowing how it could've been better but thats the learning process, overall it was our first movie and to make one 20mins long we think was very ambitious and we are very pleased with how it turned out. I hope you all enjoy it for what it is and keep replying with any comments you may have

Thanks

Silencer
Posted: Wed, 12th Oct 2005, 12:42am

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Patriot2011

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I don't understand how the guy survived... You also did not do good blue screening. It's over all a good show. 3/5
Posted: Mon, 21st Nov 2005, 9:06pm

Post 21 of 22

silencer

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Which guy do you mean? If you mean the blue guys, they were clones hence the title. If you mean Jeled Rai then he was never shown to have been killed.
Yeah the green screening wasn't great, the post below explains it all.

Thanks

Silencer
Posted: Tue, 2nd Jun 2009, 5:01pm

Post 22 of 22

therealrandomstudios

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Cool, I liked it. Are you going to make anymore?