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Creating kick dust? [ANSWER]

Posted: Mon, 12th Sep 2005, 9:31pm

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ashman

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please can some one guide me in creating dust.

I want to create an effect as if bullits hit the ground and dust is kicked up. im new so as much info would be awesome. im in the understanding that EL has a pretty good particle system, so any help in the basics of doing this would be great. i wish to mask out background images to, to give an effect that things are going on behind the action. to do these effects would i need chrominator or can i mask in EL?
cheers
ash
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 1:54am

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Jrad

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check out detonationfilms.com, then go to stock footage. I am almost positive that they have a bullet hit. After you find it, make sure that it is converted into .mov. Open it in EffectsLabDV with the stock footage. I hope that helps, I'm bad at giving directions.
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 3:30am

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Hendo

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Stock footage, as Big Kahuna suggested, is one method. But I'd suggest playing around with the Particle System. As a start, try loading up some textures and changing the colour gradient. Then try animating it. Have you gone through the tutorial in the Quickstart guide?

ashman69erdude wrote:

i wish to mask out background images to, to give an effect that things are going on behind the action. to do these effects would i need chrominator or can i mask in EL?
Yes, you can do that in EffectsLab. It has its own masking system for effects and stock media. So whether you make the dust using the Particle System or import some stock footage, you can mask it in ELab.
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 11:49am

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ashman

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great stuff, any tutes around the site on masking in EL. desperate to give it a go.
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 11:57am

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Hendo

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ashman69erdude wrote:

great stuff, any tutes around the site on masking in EL. desperate to give it a go.
Tarn's Lightsword tutorial has some basic masking in it. The masking system is identical for all the effect generators, so you can apply the concepts in the Lightsword tutorial to your Particle System effect.

http://fxhome.com/support/tutorials/view.php?i=34
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 1:18pm

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Wizard

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Rating: +7

ashman69erdude wrote:

I want to create an effect as if bullits hit the ground and dust is kicked up...so any help in the basics of doing this would be great.
A while ago I made an attempt at creating an effect of kicking dirt. After reading this, I believe it may be possible to adapt that technique in creating a "bullet hitting the ground" effect. My attempt at creating dirt being kicked up can be found here, along with steps on how to create it below.

The video found here is an example of what this effect could look like when altered to resemble a bullet hitting the ground. As I write the steps for the first effect, I will include a variation of the steps that I took to create the second effect.

The settings and steps to create these effects are as follows:

1) Textures.

Import the textures "Smoke_1" and "Smoke_2" that come standard with EffectsLab Dv. (If you require instructions on how to find these textures, and how to import them, please feel free to ask)

2) "Texture Button".

Make sure the "Texture Button" is set to "Single" and not "Animated"; this is because you are not dealing with an animated texture, so you will not achieve the desired effect if you are selected on animated. I am not sure how this may affect this effect, so it is best to stay on what is used in the videos above. Although the default setting is "Single", be sure to check by locating the "texture button" .

3) "Emitter".

In both of the example videos above the emitter is set to its default, which is "Emitter Point", "Free from origin". This means that the particles will be emitted from one single point on the canvas, and are enabled to go about their own movement once emitted.

4) "Particle Creation".

Max Particles- For these example clips, max particles does not need to be set very high. If you watch the videos, the effect does not last for a very long period of time, and there for, does not need many particles to be created at any given time. This is also not generally a big effect in most cases anyway. For the dirt example clip it was set to approximately 4000, and that is more than enough for both.

Particle Rate- For the dirt example I used a particle rate of 50. As for the dust example, a particle rate of 200 was used.

Life Time- The "Life Time" determines when each particle will disappear. In the first example life time was set to 61. In the second example life time was set to 25. Although this can be changed if you like, changing this too much can drastically change how the effect will play out. It is up to you to see how the effect is changed.

Emitter angle- The rotation wheel is used to choose the angle from which particles are ejected from the emitter. The first and second examples are set to almost the direct top. The numbers are:

  • "Absol." -8.76
  • "Relative" -8.76
  • "Turns" -0.02

Angle Range- This can actually have a big impact on how it appears the "dirt" or "dust" spreads (flies), and how it lands. To achieve the exact look in the first example clip, you want this to be set to 54. For the second clip, you will want this value to be set to 178.

Scale- This is really a personal preference setting. Going much bigger then the example clips may change the overall look to the effects, and may make you have to change other settings to compensate. Both the first, and second video clips were set to 0.20.

Note: In the examples, new particles are being created in front of the existing ones. To do this, locate "Draw new particles behind" found in "Particle Creation" and change it to "Draw new particles in front".

5) "Particle Properties".

Color Gradient/Opacity Gradient- As you can see, this is different for both the clips. This will basically just depend on the surface you are adding the effect to, so I can't really tell you which way to go with this one. If you are not sure how to change the color gradient, I would suggest reading the manuals as soon as you can, they can prove very helpful.

Again, if you have little to no experience using this gradient, I would recommend you refer to the manuals. If you can not locate your manuals, please ask, I would be happy to guide you to them. For now I will quickly tell you what to affect, and the percent of opacity to add to each tab.

These are the values you want to affect:


For the first clip, start by selecting the tab on the left of the opacity bar (by left clicking it) and set the value to 28% with the slider tab at the top. You can see what the value is at the right of the gradient window. Now select the tab on the right, and set the value to 40%. For the second clip, set the left tabs value to 4%, and the right tabs value to 5%.

Speed Randomizer- Both the dirt, and the dusts speed randomizer is set to 1.00.

Size Randomizer- Size randomizer is set to 0.90 in both of the clips as well.

6) "Environment Gravity".

This allows for the particles to behave more like dirt or dust, which eventually tend to fall, and do not just continue being pushed in one direction. In the first clip, the gravities direction and strength are set to:

  • "Absol" 230.97
  • "Relative" -129.03
  • "Turns" 0.64
  • "Strength" 0.16

The direction and strength for the second clip are set to:

  • "Absol" 172.81
  • "Relative" 172.81
  • "Turns" 0.48
  • "Strength" 0.02

Now, all of the parameters are set, we are almost done. You may be wondering why the effect in the example clips does not keep emitting. This is because the emitter has been turned off. For the first clip, advance one frame, then turn off the emitter on that frame. Do this by looking to the right under "Particle Creation". Change the emitter from "Emitter On" to "Emitter Off" by clicking the green button. The emitter will now stop ejecting until turned back on, but the particles previously emitted will continue to live out there life time.

In the second clip, I didn't start the effect until the seventh frame in. I then created the effect, advanced two frames, then turned off the emitter (which would mean I turned it off on the third frame of the effect). The same idea as the dirt example clip, but just a little different.

That covers how I accomplished those effects. If you have any questions, or if there is an area that I did not cover, or simply does not make any sense, please let me know, and I will try to clarify. I hope this is close enough to what you are looking for ashman69erdude, or at least gives you enough to go off of in your efforts to create this effect.

Note: If there are any problems with the links, or pictures supplied, please notify me by means of private message, or email, so that I may attempt to correct the error.

Have a great day.
Wizard.

Last edited Tue, 27th Sep 2005, 9:18pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 2:40pm

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ashman

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Thanks guys, special thanks to wizard. top man
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 10:19pm

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Fill

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WOOO!!! Go Wizard! +1!

Yes I would rather use the particle system then stock footage because:

-1 you can sometimes see the box around the stockfootage and also it might be a little hard to find the right 'color' for the dust that you want to 'kick up'

-2 The particle engine is MUCH more powerfull and more flexible and can do just about anything when it comes to...well..paticles!

-3 Stock footage is easy to use and if you just go the 'easy way' and use stock footage you won't gain as much expeirience with acctually using Effects Lab.

The particle engine can get tricky but when you finish you are VERY impressed with the results you get.


Chill

SWG33K
Posted: Tue, 13th Sep 2005, 10:56pm

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Wizard

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swg33k wrote:

WOOO!!! Go Wizard! +1!...Yes I would rather use the particle system then stock footage
Thank you swg33k, glad you like it. I tend to agree with you on preferring to use the particle system when possible. It isn't quite capable of everything you may want to do with it (yet, that is), but if you take the time to get to learn its functions, there is a wide range of effects that you will be able to achieve.

I actually strongly suggest members take the time to see if they can get what they want with the particle engine, before they consider making use of stock footage. Stock media can prove very useful, but that is a small aspect of EffectsLab Dv, when you consider the effects you can create with the three engines, and by attempting to create the effects yourself, you get the most out of your purchase, in my opinion that is. So those are some of the reasons I tend to agree with you on that.

Glad to see you are still posting swg33K.
Wizard.
Posted: Wed, 14th Sep 2005, 1:28am

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Fill

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Thanks Wizard...:p keep it up too...

Hey! I think it would be awesome if FXvault ALSO had textures for the particle engine!(Yes Malone I'm talking to you!) Also...Does anyone know where you could find desent textures for a particle engine? Or do you just have to hunt for it on the web?
Posted: Thu, 15th Sep 2005, 4:13pm

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ashman

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ok then, so stock footage is really the cheaters way out. and maybe some times you get a crummy black outline. right im gonna learn particles based on the info you supplied and get the effects that will make me smaile:). but what about explosions like tanks shells, im really worried that it may look to cartoony, too computer generated, ive seen the demo the guys did it looks awesome. but the somke and flames are really bright. is it time consuming to get the flames and bellowing smoke to look good.

or was the reply only referring to dust and dirt?
Posted: Thu, 15th Sep 2005, 5:56pm

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Wizard

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ashman69erdude wrote:

so stock footage is really the cheaters way out
Well, stock media can be very useful, and you can get some pretty good results using it. Creating fire graphically can be very tricky, and it is hard to make the fire look completely realistic. If it is authenticity you are after, stock footage is a good way to go about it.

I am not against the look of stock footage in the least; I only suggest that members try the particle engine for effects that it may be useful for, before they look for other means. That is mostly why I write posts on how to do effects from time to time, mainly to show what can be done with the particle engine if given the time.

The more time spent practicing, the quicker you start to look at ways of doing other effects, and realize what you have to change to make a certain type of effect you are looking for. However, that doesn't mean that you should always make it hard on yourself, and not use stock footage when prudent. If you feel stock footage would give you a better look for an effect, than by all means, go for it.

ashman69erdude wrote:

right im gonna learn particles based on the info you supplied...but what about explosions like tanks shells....
Explosions are something that I have not tried with the particle engine. It may very well be possible to create a realistic explosion, perhaps with a combination of the three engines offered, but I could not tell you how this would be done, at the moment.

ashman69erdude wrote:

ive seen the demo the guys did it looks awesome. but the somke and flames are really bright. is it time consuming to get the flames and bellowing smoke to look good
If you are referring to the video I think you are, then to let you know, the fire ball used was actually stock footage (a plug-in). I believe the smoke may have been the particle engine, but I can not be sure about that, because it has been a while since I have seen it. Smoke really is not time consuming with EffectsLab Dv, as long as you know the basics of getting the "smoke look", and depending on the complexity of the smoke effect.

If the fire stock footage you happen to choose to use is too bright, there are grading features in EffectsLab Dv that allow you to change that. Just change an attribute ("Brightness" for example) to the desired point to achieve the right look for you. You can also change composite "screen blend" mode to allow for a more vibrant, or a less vibrant look, depending again, on how you want it.

The flames looking so bright is, most likely due to the fact that that is the look they were going for in the example, and could easily be changed, I believe. Basically, what I am saying is, the option of choosing between stock media, or the three engines offered is really a situation to situation kind of thing, and will most likely be different the next time you want to attempt another effect.

Good luck with what ever you choose.
Wizard.