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Is this a bad green screen?

Posted: Tue, 15th Nov 2005, 7:57pm

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SlothPaladin

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I have been testing and testing the Chromanator demo and I am not happy with the results, I want to know if it’s my green screen’s fault or Chromanator’s.

I took a LEGO pirate ship I had laying about and took pictures of it with the camera I do my stop motion with, the resolution is 1360x1024. This picture seemed the get the best results in Chromanator, however they were still completely unacceptable.









As you can see there are ugly white edges around the image, or transparency where there should not be transparency. If I have the black level to high I get white edges and to low I get the unnecessary transparency. And if you think those pictures look bad you should see the same ship in a night setting, the edges may as well have on screen signs pointing to them saying, “Look I used green screening software!” and this has nothing to do with the lighting inconsistencies of the ship with the CG world. So do you think this is the falt of a bad green screen or bad lighting, or have I been using Chromanator wrong? This green screen was just made with flat green paint.

Now whatever the quality of my green screen job people will know that a LEGO ship in CG water is a green/blue screen, however I am dong tests on the ship because I am sure that if I can green screen it, I can green screen anything. But I need to be able to make convincing night green screen shots, on my current project I don’t want people to even think I used special FX, even though there is no way I could do it without them. The reason I like Effects Labs so much is because the moderators sometime reject my films because they can’t tell I’ve use it.
Posted: Tue, 15th Nov 2005, 8:03pm

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Magic_man12

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Yes, it is a poor greenscreen......

Well... technically the only thing wrong with it is that it is poorly lit....
But according to this site , you should be able to key it anyways (as their clame to fame is somethign like "poor greenscreen, stunning results")

I'm sure someone on here will post and give you more detailed instructions on how to get a better key from chromanator with your shots...

I have to say that no matter how good of a job you do, its still going to scream "look i used a greenscreen"... why you ask?........ How many lego boats have you seen floating on what appears to be an ocean? lol


-MAGIC
Posted: Tue, 15th Nov 2005, 8:10pm

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SlothPaladin

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Yeah, I know that.

Now whatever the quality of my green screen job people will know that a LEGO ship in CG water is a green/blue screen
I was testing with the boat becouse I figured it I could greenscreen it well, I could do anything well, my inital plans are to greenscreen clay figures and have skys I made (black poster board with wholes punched in them and backlit) and small scale buildings (smaller scale then the puppets) I built by hand. With stuff like that people should not be able to tell I used a green screen, but before I buy I want to know if I can get the results I want, so I may as well start with the hardest sort of thing.
Posted: Tue, 15th Nov 2005, 10:11pm

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TimmyD

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Rating: +2

The greenscreen is fine, it is unevenly lit, and the ship should be lit much more. How to light greenscreens:



And make sure you diffuse the light so it evens it out alot, look at this thread for more information on lighting greenscreens.

TimmyD
Posted: Sat, 19th Nov 2005, 7:08pm

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RetroWizard

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I must confess that this shot looks ok to me (but then maybe I need glasses!) The original greenscreen image is far superior to the worn out and dirty green sheet I use. I must admit, Chromanator has made me lazy in this department as I just assume the software will key it successfully and 99% of the time it does (maybe with a little help from the garbage matte.) I think for the price, Chromanator is a bargain and is capable of much better results with a little trial and error.
Posted: Sat, 19th Nov 2005, 7:12pm

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Lithium Kraft

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I'm not an expert on Chromanator (yet), but sometimes I find that instead of using the Color Difference function when your greenscreen isn't functioning well, using the Luminosity key works too. I'm still not sure though.

Oh, and by the way, just seeing that picture of that boat on the water makes me want to see the finished product of whatever it is!

2nd Edit: If I may ask, how did you do the rippled reflection? It looks really good.
Posted: Wed, 23rd Nov 2005, 1:04am

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SlothPaladin

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That LEGO film is not an *offical* project of mine, although I would like to make some pirate movie after I finish my current clay project.

The CG was made in Bryce 4 (and I have done a few test on moving water but it's a bit hard to generate it in Bryce) but the reflection is super easy, all you do is take a sprite of the ship and an alpha key into bryce as a 2D object, set it in the water and render, then render the same thing without the spirt and use the spritless render to paint out sprite in cromy but you get that sexy reflection