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Matching shutter speeds? [ANSWER]

Posted: Wed, 1st Mar 2006, 10:29am

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ashman

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is it possible to change the shutter speed on some of the effects particle or stock? Because some scenes in my footage the shutter speed is ramped up, if i place stock footage on top that is bought (filmed at normal shutter speed) it looks funny in comparison to my shot footage.
Posted: Thu, 2nd Mar 2006, 4:19pm

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Axeman

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Yeah, you can't change the shutter speed after the fact, as far as I know. The problem is that the shutter speed directly affects the amount of motion blur in each frame, and to go back and add/remove blur from certain elements of the frame would be tricky indeed.
Posted: Thu, 2nd Mar 2006, 6:43pm

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PaleRider

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Just to clarify for anybody who is confused, Shutter speed is basicly a term coined for the framerate of video. In order to acheive the illusion of a moving image, the minimum frame rate is about ten frames per second. The uk's standard frame rate (pal) is 25 fps, while the USA, Canada, Japan(NTSC), have a (a very strange) standard of 29.97 fps.
Now by increasing the speed of framerate, you capture more frames per second. This is extremly usefull if you are filming a sequence which will require to be slowed down in post.
For example, an explosion, in realtime, last barely seconds, hardly the most dramatic thing to put on screen, but by filming it at a higer film rate, it can be slowed down without losing any detail or smoothness. The same video filmed at standard rate would suffer from detail and would look "jerky" on screen.

There is, in the effects lab product, a speed icon, which alows you to increase or decrease the speed of effects such as particles.
rtfm to find out more.
Posted: Thu, 2nd Mar 2006, 11:58pm

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Hendo

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PaleRider wrote:

Just to clarify for anybody who is confused, Shutter speed is basicly a term coined for the framerate of video.
A camera's shutter speed is very different to the video frame rate. smile

A camera's aperture and shutter speed work together to control the exposure of a single frame. The aperture is like a small hole that lets light enter inside and get captured. The shutter speed (measured in seconds) is the length of time that the shutter remains open for each frame.

A high shutter speed means that the shutter is open for a smaller amount of time and hence less light can enter. To counteract the less light you would open up the aperture, or add more light sources. High shutter speeds are useful when recording fast-moving objects such as a game of sport, because otherwise the people would have lots of motion blur, especially if you freeze the frame (e.g. a tennis match, was the ball in?).

A low shutter speed means that the shutter is open for a longer time and hence more light can enter. So the picture will be brighter. But fast-moving objects will have motion blur. This is often used for artistic effect.

Frame rate, which you described, is the number of frames per second that will be captured. As you said, shooting at a higher frame rate (e.g. 60fps) and then playing it back at 30fps is a good way to achieve slow motion.

Here are some useful resources:
http://fxhome.com/support/glossary_cache/exposure.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shutter_speed
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aperture
Posted: Sat, 4th Mar 2006, 1:05pm

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PaleRider

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wow.... you learn something new everyday. And that is why i'm not a proffesional camera man. cheers for clearing that up Hendo biggrin