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Interactive lighting for lightsabers [ANSWER]

Posted: Tue, 7th Nov 2006, 10:29pm

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Black Ink Productions

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Hey eveyone i have a problem- I want to make interactive lighting for my lightsabers i just cant figure out how to do it please help
Posted: Tue, 7th Nov 2006, 10:34pm

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pixelboy

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Oeyvind has a good tutorial about this: http://fxhome.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=23035
Hope that helps!
Posted: Wed, 8th Nov 2006, 12:27am

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Wizard

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To add to that suggestion, there is also a relatively old, but still applicable tutorial written by Tarn, which is of the same premise. This lighting enhancement tutorial walks you through the process of using grading to artificially add light to a composite/effect; in this instance, the method is used to enhance a "lightsaber clash".

While the tutorial is created with Chromanator in mind, the principle still applies, and the method can quite easily be adapted to the current programs. Be sure to grade the footage first, and then complete the roto-scoping of your effect, to prevent the grading from having an affect on the light saber(s). If you have any questions about this, feel free to ask.

You may also want to consider utilizing real light sources for this type or work, as an alternative to the grading avenue. For more complex shots, using an actual light source, as apposed to trying to artificially create light interacting with the environment, may be more time effective.

Both methods have the potential to look quite realistic, it simply depends on the amount of care and attention to detail put into the effect. Perhaps a combination of both, real light sources, and grading, is something to be looked into as well.

In regards to your signature; while I find it rather creative, it is also quite large. I suggest making the dimensions considerably smaller, as large signatures can slow down the entire page for those with slower internet connects, as well as simply being distracting, and taking up an unreasonable amount of space.

Currently, your signature is 800x477. Although not a standard to which you must abide by, a recommended size for a signature is 400x110. This is a fairly reasonable size for a signature, and is more than acceptable.

I have taken the liberty of resizing your signature, to give an example of what it would look like at a more appropriate size. I have only slightly cropped some areas of the image, and then resized it to 400x207, which should be suitable.

Re-sized signature:
.

I will not remove the signature from your post, but advise that you change it at your earliest convenience. You do not have to use my alternative, but as it stands, it should still be re-sized.

Take care.
Wizard.
Posted: Wed, 8th Nov 2006, 9:36am

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Cogz

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Yeah, as Wizard says, for close-up shots particularly, the use of an actual coloured light when filming will produce a really nice result, like the use of a strobe light when filming a scene with firing guns. However with some imaginative masking and colouring you might be able to produce a similar result as in the tutorial written by tarn.
Posted: Wed, 8th Nov 2006, 9:43am

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Simon K Jones

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Indeed, I used the technique mentioned in that old lighting tutorial when creating the current lightsaber example clip on the site - the one on the front page and product pages. You can see it in action whenever the lightsabers clash - the local area gets lit up by the collision.
Posted: Thu, 9th Nov 2006, 2:11am

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Black Ink Productions

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Tarn wrote:

Indeed, I used the technique mentioned in that old lighting tutorial when creating the current lightsaber example clip on the site - the one on the front page and product pages. You can see it in action whenever the lightsabers clash - the local area gets lit up by the collision.
Its still doesnt work and i tried all of them evn the real lighting and that didnt work
Posted: Thu, 9th Nov 2006, 5:58am

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Axeman

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Well, all of the techniques suggested are tried and proven, so keep fiddling and trying them until you get the hang of it.

Some explanation of the results you got when you tried might help us see where you are going wrong.
Posted: Thu, 9th Nov 2006, 10:25am

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Simon K Jones

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Turd Furguson wrote:

Its still doesnt work and i tried all of them evn the real lighting and that didnt work
In what way did it not work?

I'm not sure how real lighting can't work, unless you've somehow broken the laws of physics. smile