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Casino Royale (2006) Grading

Posted: Wed, 13th Dec 2006, 3:25pm

Post 1 of 13

Eargrove Productions

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I was wondering if anyone could be so kind and make the grading
of the Casino Royale (2006).
I want the coloured grading, not the black and white that lasts in the first 5 minutes.
I'm using Effectslab pro.
Thanks to that person who will take some time of and do this for me wink
Posted: Wed, 13th Dec 2006, 3:36pm

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Redhawksrymmer

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Since most scenes use different kinds of grading, it would be easier if you could write a scene in particular. Also, really none of the scenes in the movie are using any spectacular grading looks/methods, so try using a combination of some warmth and basic filters to achive for example "The Beach Look" of the movie.
Posted: Wed, 13th Dec 2006, 4:59pm

Post 3 of 13

Eargrove Productions

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Okey.
But what I want is a grading that looks like it is filmed with a
professional camera and fits for actions movies like james bond.
Posted: Wed, 13th Dec 2006, 5:19pm

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Sollthar

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Check this website or google for "filmlook", a topic that has been WELL covered everywhere.


Basically: If you want your movie to look like shot with a professional camera; shoot it with a professional camera........
Posted: Thu, 14th Dec 2006, 12:44am

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Axeman

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Even that won't do it all. The key to getting your footage to look like that is lighting. Even with an inexpensive camera, lighting the scene properly will make all the difference in the world.

Digital grading can certainly help, but it is no replacement for proper lighting.
Posted: Thu, 14th Dec 2006, 1:23am

Post 6 of 13

Sollthar

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And even that won't do it all... After you've light your scene and shot it with film, you need to choose the right process to develop and scan your film - depending on what methods you use, it can have a large impact on your look.
Posted: Thu, 14th Dec 2006, 4:23am

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Axeman

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Hehe, well said.
Posted: Mon, 1st Jan 2007, 7:33pm

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davlin

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Yep...well said both of you...If its so important to have your movie
look like its been "filmed"then use film and that's it.
Hobbyists should never try to "ape"professionals because you can
NEVER compete with the standard of quality put out by the "big boys" and that makes all your hardwork look soooooo amateurish.
What you should do is something original which is within your skill level and available time frame.
Very few of the Pro's have that luxury with finance controlling most of the artistic levels which leaves many directors frustrated but rich.

So be happy that the only limitations you'll have will be your own.
Posted: Mon, 1st Jan 2007, 8:33pm

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jmax

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It won't get you "pro" quality, but a basic contrast boost is the easiest way to get a simple quality enhancement on your footage.
Posted: Mon, 1st Jan 2007, 11:53pm

Post 10 of 13

Ste

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Just to let you know Bond did have a grade on it. CFC Framestore did it.
Posted: Tue, 2nd Jan 2007, 3:14am

Post 11 of 13

Serpent

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StevoRivington wrote:

Just to let you know Bond did have a grade on it. CFC Framestore did it.
It was also shot on very nice film cameras with top notch lighting set up by top notch cinematographers. Sure, grading serves a purpose, but what people above were saying is that it doesn't make or break the look. Several other elements do.
Posted: Tue, 2nd Jan 2007, 8:07am

Post 12 of 13

Axeman

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Every film ever made has some sort of grading. Traditional color grading is done during the film developing process, so whatever developing technique they decide on sets the color grade of the film. And obviously, more and more productions are moving toward digital grading, as it gives you greater versatility and is less risky as far as the film and negatives are concerned. I think what Redhawksrymmer was saying is just that there is nothing unusual about the color grading of that particular film. It makes the footage look nice, obviously, but is a relatively basic grading job, which could be approximated with a number of presets already available.

I also wanted to point out that grading should never be underestimated. Just in case any of us came off wrong above; getting an authentic 'film look' on a no-bugted or low-budget production is virtually impossible, but grading can help tremendously. And even when you perhaps don't have the budget to light your scenes the way you would like, both the quality of the footage and the mood of the scene can be greatly enhanced by a good grading job. At the same time, never do less that your utmost to shoot the best possible footage with whatever you can get your hands on in the way of lighting and equipment. "We'll fix it in post" is no excuse for sloppy filming techniques.

Did you find a preset or a bit of grading of your own that somewhat gave you what you are after, jamesbond?
Posted: Tue, 2nd Jan 2007, 2:27pm

Post 13 of 13

shadu

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Is their any place on the WEB or book reference about the color grading and the mood they give? A guide line of the rule on the grading? Like this blue can be ue for the night shoot... etc...

Shadu