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Children of Men

Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 4:42am

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Waser

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Saw this today. Scrap whatever I said about whatever being the best of 2006, and shift them all down. This is, without a doubt, the best movie of 2006 (despite the 2007 wide release).

The long takes, the colors, and the acting, all came together to make one hell of a movie. There was more than one occasion where I almost wept at the film's overwhelming-ness.

Please tell me more of you saw this.
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 4:58am

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Hendo

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Yes, I also thoroughly enjoyed it.

I think er-no was an AD on it. And if memory serves me, Hybrid was an extra or something?
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 5:46am

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Hybrid-Halo

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As you can see - the role I play in Children of Men is monumental.

-Hybrid.
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 8:05am

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Waser

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NO.......F***ING........WAY


Hybrid. Your level of god-ness to me has risen 24%
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 2:18pm

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Sollthar

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Hehe, I wanna throw something at Clive Owen too!


I loved the film for it's filmmaking values. Some of the stuff was absolutely mad.
As an audience, I wasn't too fond of the film however, it never really managed to pull me in. But the filmmaker in me was all awake and watching very closely!!
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 2:56pm

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jotoki

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My favourite film of the year too. In fact I was astonished when I read the various lists of favourite films and Children of men wasn't in any of them. Of course there are many differening tastes out there but I at least expected to see it in some lists. I understand why now with the limited 2006 release it didn't feature at all.
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 3:17pm

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er-no

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This was the first feature film I worked as an assistant director on and I'm pretty proud of that fact. Although it was a grudging film to work on (even with the short stint I did) I am very impressed with the final outcome, I also love seeing some of my own work within a feature film on the screen, makes it worthwhile each time!

smile Great film.
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 3:56pm

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jotoki

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Hey er-no thats pretty impressive. I'd love to know what and where you studied to reach the level you have of being and AD on one of my favourite films of all time not just last year. At 39 I may not be able to study the same things you have but I would like to know how you got to this point as i'd love to get into the business one way or another and you have obviously done some of the right things so far.

Oh and what did you mean by a "grudging film to work on" ?
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 4:04pm

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er-no

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jotoki wrote:

Hey er-no thats pretty impressive. I'd love to know what and where you studied to reach the level you have of being and AD on one of my favourite films of all time not just last year. At 39 I may not be able to study the same things you have but I would like to know how you got to this point as i'd love to get into the business one way or another and you have obviously done some of the right things so far.

Oh and what did you mean by a "grudging film to work on" ?
On an open forum I won't go into detail about some of the crew and cast problems that arose in production. As for the other information, where I studied etc... having studied did nothing towards me working in feature films. I began training as a boom operator for the BBC in 2004 and after two months then carried on doing that for a bit (learning production and post production location and studio sound as well).

Lots of stuff, I worked on a couple of music videos and 'may' have exaggerated credentials to get different roles in small productions, then I completed Project One. I feel on showing Project One to a few people in the right places, my name seemed to slowly seep around, and one night at about 10pm I got a call asking for me to turn up to work on Children of Men in Pinewood at 4am the next morning. You can't turn that down and I went onto doing about 20 days on the film helping assist and direct the crowd - especially the military sequences.

Lots and lots of bits I've missed out and some great stories from more recent productions biggrin But yeah, I'll leave it there, as i've been told a few times, and althogh I'm still in the process of finishing a film degree, you cannot learn film. Sure you can learn the tecniques, but being able to creatively apply them is something you either have or don't.

smile
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 4:17pm

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jotoki

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Thanks for that er-no ....I think lol I guess working at the BBC would help you a lot. I'm going to assume you're London based ?
All the UK courses I've seen seem to be in London. I agree with what you say about needing the creativity there to use the techniques , of course you need the techniques to apply the creativity in the best possible way too so it was interesting for me to learn what you studied from that perspective. Its great that some on here make it though. sounds like you'll have a good career ahead.
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 8:29pm

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Anne

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er-no wrote:

jotoki wrote:

Hey er-no thats pretty impressive. I'd love to know what and where you studied to reach the level you have of being and AD on one of my favourite films of all time not just last year. At 39 I may not be able to study the same things you have but I would like to know how you got to this point as i'd love to get into the business one way or another and you have obviously done some of the right things so far.

Oh and what did you mean by a "grudging film to work on" ?
On an open forum I won't go into detail about some of the crew and cast problems that arose in production. As for the other information, where I studied etc... having studied did nothing towards me working in feature films. I began training as a boom operator for the BBC in 2004 and after two months then carried on doing that for a bit (learning production and post production location and studio sound as well).

Lots of stuff, I worked on a couple of music videos and 'may' have exaggerated credentials to get different roles in small productions, then I completed Project One. I feel on showing Project One to a few people in the right places, my name seemed to slowly seep around, and one night at about 10pm I got a call asking for me to turn up to work on Children of Men in Pinewood at 4am the next morning. You can't turn that down and I went onto doing about 20 days on the film helping assist and direct the crowd - especially the military sequences.

Lots and lots of bits I've missed out and some great stories from more recent productions biggrin But yeah, I'll leave it there, as i've been told a few times, and althogh I'm still in the process of finishing a film degree, you cannot learn film. Sure you can learn the tecniques, but being able to creatively apply them is something you either have or don't.

smile
surprised That's awesome to be able to work on a feature length film! How was working with Alfonso Cuaron? One of these days I wish I could just be the "Girl who brings the donuts" just so I can be on the set of a a production with millions of dollars going into it.

I really wanna see this film. It looks incredible.
Posted: Sat, 6th Jan 2007, 9:51pm

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jmax

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I heard it was good. I'll probably see it this weekend. What other dystopian stories would you guys say it compares to?
Mad Max?
Brave New World?
Equilibium?
The Giver?
Blade Runner?
1984?
Thoughts on it would be appreciated.
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 1:27am

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Anne

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jmax wrote:

I heard it was good. I'll probably see it this weekend. What other dystopian stories would you guys say it compares to?
Mad Max?
Brave New World?
Equilibium?
The Giver?
Blade Runner?
1984?
Thoughts on it would be appreciated.
I heard that it compares to Blade Runner.
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 2:32am

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Kovacs

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jmax wrote:

What other dystopian stories would you guys say it compares to?
Mad Max?
Brave New World?
Equilibium?
The Giver?
Blade Runner?
1984?
Thoughts on it would be appreciated.
It's doesn't compare to any of those films really.

Well...maybe 1984 if you added Saving Private Ryan or some other 'punch you in the gut' war film to the mix. The dystopia is much more in your face than V for Vendetta, for example; you feel the hopelessness and the subsiquent hope the child brings a lot more.

This is the vanuted 'action science fiction film with a message' a lot of us have been waiting for.
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 3:14am

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er-no

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Anne wrote:

er-no wrote:

jotoki wrote:

stuff
surprised That's awesome to be able to work on a feature length film! How was working with Alfonso Cuaron? One of these days I wish I could just be the "Girl who brings the donuts" just so I can be on the set of a a production with millions of dollars going into it.

I really wanna see this film. It looks incredible.
Donuts? Not sure about that.. caterers do that! Pizzas however do get ordered, on Children of Men after 15 hours of shooting on a cold day a year ago 150 pizzas were ordered and 250 chinese dishes (you don't want to know the bill).... Perhaps look into being a Set PA in a few years time then Anne?
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 3:19am

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Anne

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er-no wrote:

Anne wrote:

er-no wrote:

jotoki wrote:

stuff
surprised That's awesome to be able to work on a feature length film! How was working with Alfonso Cuaron? One of these days I wish I could just be the "Girl who brings the donuts" just so I can be on the set of a a production with millions of dollars going into it.

I really wanna see this film. It looks incredible.
Donuts? Not sure about that.. caterers do that! Pizzas however do get ordered, on Children of Men after 15 hours of shooting on a cold day a year ago 150 pizzas were ordered and 250 chinese dishes (you don't want to know the bill).... Perhaps look into being a Set PA in a few years time then Anne?
I'll start a new donut trend.
Just kidding. Yah, who knows, I think some kind of job like being a "runner" or whatever you wanna call it would do good for me.
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 3:29am

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ben3308

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As soon as I'm old enough (a handful of months), I'm doing everything I can and going everywhere I can to work on movie sets.

One day I'll be a DP, believe it. wink
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 4:12am

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Atom

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ben3308 wrote:

As soon as I'm old enough (a handful of months), I'm doing everything I can and going everywhere I can to work on movie sets.

One day I'll be a DP, believe it. wink
*cough*COCKY*cough*
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 4:16am

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Bryce007

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So will I Ben. You'll have to fight me for it.



On a more serious note, Did this movie have any action in it, or was it more of a simmering drama?
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 7:59am

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Waser

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This movie has some of the most intense action I have seen in recent years.
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 11:05am

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ashman

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Ah yes Children of Men, I really liked this film and think it has the quality's and techniques that will no doubt be replicated in other movies. In 2 years im sure you'll find your self saying 'woah, that was like in Children f Men', as people find themselves saying it about the Matrix. I can't wait to purchase this on DVD and look forward to the special Features. One of the Best Films in 2006 for me alongside Casino Royale.
Posted: Sun, 7th Jan 2007, 4:50pm

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Mantra

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Children of Men was an excellent movie experience; great acting, direction and story.
Posted: Mon, 8th Jan 2007, 7:46am

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Bryce007

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Finally saw it tonight....


Acting was generally good. Direction was good. Screenplay was good.


Set/production design was INSANE. Absolutely brilliant in every way.


I didn't find myself enjoying "Key" very much. Fairly annoying. But Clive was great as usual.

The battle FX were absolutely intense.


This certainly wasn't my favorite film as of recent, but I did like it for the most part.
Posted: Mon, 8th Jan 2007, 10:33am

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Waser

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I'm just gonna say it, because we (and I mean I'm) thinkin' it.

Kee's a babe.

There. I said it.
Posted: Wed, 10th Jan 2007, 12:00am

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SurfBoy

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jotoki wrote:

My favourite film of the year too. In fact I was astonished when I read the various lists of favourite films and Children of men wasn't in any of them. Of course there are many differening tastes out there but I at least expected to see it in some lists. I understand why now with the limited 2006 release it didn't feature at all.
I think thats because most American critics hadnt seen it yet though.

Props to you er-no. You truly are living the dream.

Thats incredible that you got to work so closely with a director as great as Alfonso.
Posted: Thu, 11th Jan 2007, 3:46am

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Gnome326

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I got out to see the movie today, and I personally enjoyed it, though I took my grandmother, uncle, and cousin too, and they all seemed pretty pissed that I dragged them along. confused

I'm sure my uncle and cousin would have enjoyed it if it wasn't for the ending, and I guess my grandmother doesn't care for those types of movies.


*spoilers*
But anyways, they brought up a valid point about the ending. There is a lot of build up to this end and its like right before the lid pops off of the jar, the base of it cracks open and all the marbles fall out.

So what happens? Do they find a cure for humanity or is it just that everyone will die off and only the child's offspring lives on? I personally think that it would have ended better with the main character explaining what the future held whether it just meant that this child would start over the human race, like something of a re-telling of a contemporary Noahs Arc, or if it lead to something a little more then just hope for some people?

The movie could have been just a little more, but personally I liked the way it turned out, though I think I could have loved it wink
Posted: Thu, 11th Jan 2007, 10:58am

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jotoki

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the ending was there to leave a feeling of hope. Beyond that it left what what happened to the imagination. Showing anything more would have ruined it for me. The director himself said that it's amazing how different groups have put their own spin on the film. There is no religious message at all there so no, it's not noah's arc nor is it a catholic film as some catholics have said (rough quote from the director again). It's a story. Some post on other forums I've read complained that there was no explaination of why women cant have babies anymore, it's good to see noone on here has seriously said that yet. Fact is it was unnecessary to the story being told. The feeling created as the ship comes out of the fog is all thats needed. Yes we all might die leaving the kid alone, yes the kid might be the start of the new human race. Thing is it's not spoon fed to you and thats refreshing, for me anyway.
Posted: Thu, 11th Jan 2007, 2:43pm

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Jabooza

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er-no wrote:

This was the first feature film I worked as an assistant director on and I'm pretty proud of that fact. Although it was a grudging film to work on (even with the short stint I did) I am very impressed with the final outcome, I also love seeing some of my own work within a feature film on the screen, makes it worthwhile each time!

smile Great film.
WHOA!!! eek That's amazing!
Posted: Fri, 12th Jan 2007, 7:12pm

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RusSEAL

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As you and I had talked- I hadn't realized the [then] "grueling production" you had been working on had been DoM, Er-No; my esteemed and heart-felt congratulations on your work!

I've yet to see it [an infant and a 5 year old take up far too much of my time it would seem and getting a baby sitter feels worse than conducting an American Idol talent search at times] but I will make every effort to get out and enjoyit as a theater event and not just a DVD rental.

Again- my humblest and proudest Kudos to you- what others call "living the dream" I'd agree that you and I would call it "a living"!

Here's to the hopes your next endeavor will be equally rewarding but not nearly as taxing!

Russ
Posted: Sat, 13th Jan 2007, 7:40pm

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Gnome326

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here is no religious message at all there so no, it's not noah's arc nor is it a catholic film as some catholics have said (rough quote from the director again).
While Noah's Arc is "religiously" based, I don't think it has a religious message. Though when I made the comparison to CoM to Noahs Arc I was thinking, "Noah's Arc - God destroys the earth with a flood and saves a family of 7, along with 2 of every species of animal." Where as in CoM the comparison would be, "Nature slowly kills off the human race, save 1 family which would be able to coninue to produce long after everyone else has died." So, just wanted to clear up the comparison.

And I agree that the reason why women can't reproduce is a very trivial and small reason. The fact is that no one in the movie understands either, so why should the audience get to learn the reason? Plus after watching all of George Romero's Zombie's movies, alogn with the remake, and the parody, the question of as to why never really strikes your mind. You just accept it and continue watching the story.
The only questions I had were answered in the movie. (IE what happened to his child, why he and his wife/girlfriend broke up, among other things) Though I would have liked to have seen a slightly better ending (maybe not so abrupt) I can live with it, and I understand why Alfonso CuarĂ³n went that route.
Posted: Sun, 14th Jan 2007, 12:58am

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Waser

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Gnome326 wrote:

after watching all of George Romero's Zombie's movies, alogn with the remake, and the parody, the question of as to why never really strikes your mind. You just accept it and continue watching the story.
Wasn't it because of a space probe blowing up in earth's atmosphere, showering the North East with radiation?

I mean Children of Men, yes, I like this movie.
Posted: Mon, 15th Jan 2007, 2:49pm

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Penguin

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ben3308 wrote:

One day I'll be a DP, believe it. wink
All aspire to be like me.
Posted: Tue, 16th Jan 2007, 10:47am

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jotoki

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Hey Gnome, I cant remember if they said exactly what happened to their son apart from the fact that he died. It was alluded to however that they broke up as a part of the aftermath of that event. When they met on the bus the argument quickly moved to how Theo (Clive Owen for those that haven't seen it yet) handled the loss. It was a strong pointer to what destroyed their relationship as it showed this was the wound that had never healed between them.
Posted: Tue, 16th Jan 2007, 8:06pm

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ajjax44

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Hey er-no congrats on getting the gig on that film! I really enjoyed it. I was struck pretty hard by it and the time I spent watching it was the most entertaining time I've had at the movies this year. You said you worked on the military sequences - those were some of the most impressive to me. I spent a couple of weekends on a US military training facility and I noticed that the military in the film was behaving tactically...almost the same as the real military did during their training missions...which can be scary.

Dug the film because of the way it's shot and the way they cast Michael Cane, and because Clive Owen is one of my favorite actors. It takes some balls to shoot such famous actors in a wide shot for 5 mins straight and to walk the camera around complex sets like that. I'm still a little dumbfounded on how they did a lot of that stuff... A lot of planning I guess! Outstanding technical achievements all around in this film. Hopefully you can scoot your way up and get that directing spot someday soon like the director of V for Vendetta did. Good luck to you.
Posted: Sun, 21st Jan 2007, 3:44am

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Evman

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I finally saw this tonight (legally I might add), and I was absolutely blown away. I'd rank it as one of the top ten most powerful films i've ever seen. Er-no, you should be proud to have worked on this one. The scariest/most powerful stuff wasn't the gruesome stuff but rather the stuff like suicide pills/etc being completely routine that was frightening. I'm in awe right now and can't really put all my thoughts into words, but I will eventually.
Posted: Sun, 21st Jan 2007, 5:49am

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Gnome326

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jotoki wrote:

Hey Gnome, I cant remember if they said exactly what happened to their son apart from the fact that he died. It was alluded to however that they broke up as a part of the aftermath of that event. When they met on the bus the argument quickly moved to how Theo (Clive Owen for those that haven't seen it yet) handled the loss. It was a strong pointer to what destroyed their relationship as it showed this was the wound that had never healed between them.
I believe they said the child got sick and died as a result of it, but I can't remember the exact way that he frased it.
Posted: Sat, 13th Oct 2007, 4:01am

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Anne

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Wow! I cant believe I just got around to watching this movie [finished it with all the bonus features a few minutes ago]. I am a bit frustrated by the ending, why people couldnt get pregnant, and why everyone was fighting-- but thats okay. The cinematography, as mentioned numerous times in this thread, was amazing. If you havent seen the DVD, you should rent or buy a copy because they have a segment on the 5 min shots [like the rig for the car scene in which five actors were in the car and people were attacking from outside the car]. The intensity of this movie was great. I was about to get emotional... and although I did well up, the tears never came...

Oh, and for those who were wondering, there was this whole scene with Jasper when he explains that Theo and Julian's son had died from a flu pandemic. Theo listens from just outside the room.
Posted: Mon, 15th Oct 2007, 5:16pm

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Tommy92L

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er-no you freaking worked on this! Thats insaine! OMG. I thought it was some insaine typo! WHo else here has done something this big


EDIT after I took my meds: I LOVED the filming in it. And my 2 favorite scenes

The dirt bike part and when the lady gets popped in the throat.

When the jets fly over at the end (I actually took days trying recreate something as epic as that in my halo custom edition game.
Posted: Wed, 31st Oct 2007, 11:09am

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Simon K Jones

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Finally saw this on DVD a couple of days ago. Astounding film. In fact, I'd go as far as saying this is the best film of the decade so far (that I've seen, obviously).

Hugely gripping and entertaining, and gobsmackingly impressive filmmaking. This was the first time for years where I've genuinely thought "I have no idea how they did this" - and I love that feeling.

This is PROPER sci-fi, in the grand tradition of sci-fi short stories and literature. We need more stuff like this in movies - normally we only get the pulpy, Flash Gordon style stuff (which is also great, of course).
Posted: Wed, 31st Oct 2007, 11:58am

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Frosty G

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I know there was a conversation about how some movies are better than the books...this book hugely falls into that category. The book was meh, the movie was fantastic. Long live Clive Owens.