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35mm grading

Posted: Thu, 28th Jun 2007, 9:05pm

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Eargrove Productions

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I was wondering if anybody could make me a grading that looks like is shoot with a 35mm camera.
On advance thanks. smile
Posted: Thu, 28th Jun 2007, 10:43pm

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Axeman

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Well, first off, there are a LOT of film-look presets already available. If none of them suit your needs, perhaps you could be more specific about what you are after?

Secondly, there are approximately 6 billion and 4 different grading looks that a movie shot on 35mm film could have; consider the fact that nearly all theatrical releases are shot on 35mm, and the grading they use varies hugely.

Thirdly, keep in mind that the professional look of films shot on 35mm has more to do with proper lighting than it does with the fact that 35mm film was used. Also, the variety of 35mm stock available can have a major impact on the look of the film.
Posted: Thu, 28th Jun 2007, 11:00pm

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Sollthar

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I was wondering if anybody could make me a grading that looks like is shoot with a 35mm camera.
To keep the answer simple:

NO.
No one can make that, because it's impossible.

If you want your movie to look like shot on 35mm, shoot on 35mm.
Posted: Fri, 29th Jun 2007, 10:56am

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Eargrove Productions

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I could shoot with a 35mm film camera, if I could find a site that had a cheap one, any ideas?
Posted: Fri, 29th Jun 2007, 11:16am

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DavidLittlefield

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I would try paying attention to lighting and having a good story line before you start worrying about getting into actual film.
Posted: Wed, 4th Jul 2007, 3:49pm

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Rockfilmers

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And also if you want it to look like film, you need to film at 24 Frames per second.
Posted: Wed, 4th Jul 2007, 3:58pm

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Simon K Jones

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Rockfilmers wrote:

And also if you want it to look like film, you need to film at 24 Frames per second.
That's a bit of a fallacy, really. You're not going to see a huge difference, especially if you're just shooting on PAL (which is 25fps).

Filming at 24fps is only worth doing if you're specifically going to transfer to film for theatrical projection. If you're not, there's really very little point - all you're doing is shooting in a format that most TVs can't play. It also won't really help make your footage look more 'like film', it'll just be at 24fps. General audiences in particular simply won't notice any difference.

If you want your footage to look like film, then shoot on film. Simple as that.

If you want your footage to look professional, however, which I suspect is what you really mean, then personally I'd recommend concentrating on the following, which WILL be appreciated by both general and technical audiences, in order of cheap->expensive:

1. Frame your shots very, very carefully. Shot composition is vital.
2. Edit your movie according to the proper language of film.
3. Grade and colour correct your footage. Particularly check that your blacks are black, rather than just a mixture of greys.
4. Use a proper 3-point or 2-point lighting set-up.
5. Shoot progressive footage if your camera supports it. Make sure it does PROPER progressive, not a bodged version.
6. Use a good wide angle lens.
7. Shoot on HD (not HDV), with something like an HVX-200.
8. Shoot with a 35mm lens adapter doodad.
Posted: Thu, 5th Jul 2007, 5:57pm

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Plainly

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Tarn wrote:

3. Grade and colour correct your footage. Particularly check that your blacks are black, rather than just a mixture of greys.
As a matter of fact, just yesterday I was thinking how I should get another NLE (by another, I mean other than WMMaker), because WMM doesn't render black as black, but, as you said, as a mixture of greys.

Tarn wrote:

5. Shoot progressive footage if your camera supports it. Make sure it does PROPER progressive, not a bodged version.
Just wondering...
What's the difference between progressive and interlaced? Well, I know the difference, but why does it look any different? You just need to de-interlace the interlaced footage, no?

Thanks in advance for the answers. smile
I hope my question wasn't too nooby. wink
Posted: Wed, 29th Aug 2007, 2:43pm

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The Nemesis2161

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Umm, replay to you askying about 35mm grading, CCGM's film preset for Final
Cut makes it look like 35 to me.