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Home Schoolers

Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 2:18am

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Tommy92L

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Anyone here homeschooled? I hate my school and looking into it.

post your thoughts, opinions.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 2:35am

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BlueSmudge

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Most homeschooler people I've met are completely socially backwards. Don't do it.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 5:56am

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SilverDragon7

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You make me laugh BlueSmudge. Those you have been homeschooled their whole lives are generally socially backwards, those who have been through school and then went homeschooled (like me) generally aren't.

I have been homeschooled since my 7th Grade year (I'm in 11th now), it has had its ups and downs, but it's something I suggest because you have already had the social experince in school.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 6:11am

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Frosty G

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I would say don't. Of course this is from a point of view that isn't your own. I don't know your personal situation but is it really so bad that you want to leave? I think it could start a bad habit of avoiding a problem instead of standing up. Again, coming from someone who doesn't know your situation.

Also, I just don't see how being homeschooled could possibly replace the value of a classroom. Having a wide range of teachers good and bad to learn from and being able to work things out with people in the classroom.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 6:14am

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SilverDragon7

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I just do online courses, just as good wink.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 6:34am

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ben3308

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I would say absolutely don't do it. I have seen, time and time again, people who choose to go homeschooled become completely and utterly crippled in social decorum.

To add an interjection, what SilverDragon says about gaining the necessary social skills and then getting homeschooled is partly true- but ultimately flawed. I think American students NEED the high school experience. Now, taking your senior year off would be okay (though I dunno why you would), but cutting out of regular school before hitting high school isn't a smart decision, and it's something I don't think homeschooled kids often realize.

They either are lacking completely in social skills (which you gain from being thrust into the real world of public school) or their views on proper social decorum are so skewed they're dangerous (many I know have heard about drugs and alcohol amongst teens, but instead of having a beer at a party they overdo it with a spoon full of heroin).

Then there are of course the more regular people, who become adept at distinguishing the more acceptable social skills from the unacceptable ones (like SilverDragon, for instance); but on the whole by homeschooling you're not allowing yourself to reap the benefits of social interaction and people skills that you would otherwise gain from school. And yes, I know there are 'homschool unions' and whatnot where homeschool kids can meet and greet. But this isn't the same as day-to-day interaction. Kids need stimulation with other human beings so that they can be appropriately functioning members of the real world. This is also how long-term friendships and relationships are cultivated.

I go to what can be considered an abnormal school. It's small (200 people in the ENTIRE school) and waaaaay too academic-oriented (no sports, few electives) and because of taking this 'non-public-school-ish' route (it is a public school, but a specialized one) I've robbed myself of several 'normal' high school experiences I really, really would have to like to have had. My twin brother, on the other hand, who went to a 'normal' school as it were, has been to football games, played on the golf team, ridden the homecoming float and done a lot of things I wish I could do. I think this is bad, but then I consider the plight of homeschooled kids: they don't get to do any of these things, let alone the things 'normal' schools do.

Then, of course, you need to consider the magnitude of the education. To be frank, parents cannot teach as well as teachers. Yes, yes, I know there are some really pants teachers out there, and every school is different; but hear this: a different teacher focusing on his/her own class and lesson plan daily is going to be more effective than your mom readng you something from the internet. It just is.

I myself am a very intellectual person. I read from the dictionary, Wikipedia, and other forms of literature on a daily basis. My Firefox bookmarks for reference material must be thousands of items long. But this does not, by any means, qualify me not going to school to learn this information. You can't often replace a good calculus teacher or an inspiring English teacher. Hell, if not for the friends, don't homeschool for the lack of teachers. Teachers are known to be disliked a lot of the time, but once you find a good one; one with which you engender a whole new learning experience, it is perhaps one of the most inspiring experiences you can have in high school. My AP United States Government teacher is like that now. His whole class is taught through storytelling and allusion, and it is a true joy to go to everyday. And even though it's a great class, I'm still learning mor ein there than ANY other class. To add insult to injury, too, I don't even like government or history. I'm a sciences guy.

I'm also not for the 'ditch what the law says we're supposed to do and find something better' ideal of homeschoolers. Do parents realize what kind of precedent this sets for how their kids deal with their issues? Instead of standing up to- or even being unfalteringly tolerate of- an obstacle, you simply shirk whatever responsibility you have in regard to it and do your own thing.

Sorry, but that's not how the world works.

I have one or two totally pants teachers. In fact, last six weeks (does anyone else use 6 week period of grading?) in AP English all the black kids in class got A's while everyone else got below an A (post-conventional black teacher who believes her 'brothers and sisters gonna need some extra help'). I was outraged- I'd done all the work and turned in everything, not to mention eloquently written and masterfully crafted in syntax several essays which were heads above the competition- that even some of the stupidest kids in the class had gotten better performance reviews than me; but instead of simply dropping the class I stood up for myself. I have dealt with the teacher's biases and have realized that at the end of the day, I'm better than that person. When dogged in class for knowing the answer, instead of lying down and refraining, I cut in and don't take crap from the teacher. I know when I'm in the right, and I stand up for that fact. And guess what? My class applauds me for this. Openly, actually. During class, even. And my teacher, instead of sending me to ISS, concedes. She knows she's wrong, no use arguing it.

Now this is of course a less-than-savory part of the high school experience, but this doesn't make it any less important. Facing one or two issues and standing against them is all part of the real world and high school succeeds in preparing you as such.

I hope you read what I have wrote and take it into consideration. While I know SilverDragon from here pretty decent enough to know he's ended up okay, the majority of homeschoolers I know have ended up very profoundly screwed, both socially and educationally.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 7:20am

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Bryce007

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I've never went to public or private school. I'm 22.


And?
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 8:59am

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Bflat5

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I'd say it all depends on your reasons. If you go to a school in an area where academic standards so low you're not learning anything then you'd be much better off getting an alternative education.

Where I live the public school system is so bad even most of the board of education have their kids in private schools!
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 10:33am

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Joshua Davies

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I myself am a very intellectual person. I read from the dictionary, Wikipedia, and other forms of literature on a daily basis.
HEH
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 12:12pm

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Arktic

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I've never went to public or private school. I'm 22.
Obviously, Bryce, you're socially inept and you can't read or write.

Obviously.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 12:29pm

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Xcession

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If you're not being exposed to the same situations as frequently, or in as equal measure as your peers, you're likely to have some re-integration issues once you rejoin the same peer-group in the wider world.

The above is a statement about life, not school. Whether those re-integration issues are "being a total social retard" or just feeling a little awkward from time to time, is entirely down to your up-bringing and the context in which you were separated from your peers.

Being home-schooled means you're missing out on the social interaction of the classroom and playground, but provided that you maintain more usual contacts with friends outside school times, you'll be missing out on little else.

All of life's experiences are character-building though, both the good and the bad in equal measure. Being protected from everything is equally as damaging as not being, so unless you're experiencing stuff you may not turn out to be quite the adult you aspire to be.

Unless you deliberately seek out a bully to punch you in the face, in your free time outside home-school, you simply won't experience that until later in life, at a point where ... perhaps...some prior experience might have come in handy.

Thats an extreme example and note that i didn't say being bullied is a good thing - I'm simply stating that many key events in your youth happen at school, so to NOT experience them may disadvantage you in some way.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 12:52pm

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Simon K Jones

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Yeah, it all depends on experience really. School tends to be something of a test ground for life, so you can experience a variety of situations while still being relatively safe - that's the idea, anyway. Obviously it works better at some schools than others.

It's also worth noting, however, that once you leave school, it becomes increasingly irrelevant. While at the time it appears to be The Entire World, it rapidly becomes a footnote in your life, once you actually get out there and start making something of yourself.

So I'd say it's not so much school itself that is important, but simply a variety of experiences. If you head into your 20s and the 'Real World' without having a broad portfolio of experiences, you're going to be in trouble.

As long as your parents can provide and allow for those experiences, both socially and educationally, then I don't see any problems with homeschooling. But if it's going to cut you off from the world, or allow your parents to shield you from everything, then I'd be wary.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 1:51pm

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Merrick

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I've been homeschooled since 5th grade. My dad had already been teaching some high school/community college before we even started, so we have a good teacher.

I would agree that it all depends on your reasons. I'm really homeschooled because my sister was not having fun in school and we took her out. When she left, I figured I'd come along.

Many people will tell you that homeschooling can screw you up socially, but my theory is that many parents will start homeschooling kids because they already are screwed up socially. Homeschooling isn't what does it to them, see what I mean.

I do agree that I don't see people as much as I would like, but I took drivers education at a public high school just a few weeks ago and there was no one there that I would really want to be friends with. Also, when I started homeschooling, I joined Boy scouts, Tae Kwon Do, and a couple smaller homeschool groups so that I would get to see people about every day. I have talked to a whole lot of people and they never had a thought that I was homeschooled or that anything was wrong with me until they asked me what school I went to. When I told them I was homeschooled, the got a little nervous acting around me.

I have had much higher self-esteem ever since I became homeschooled. I've been a lot happier. I also started making movies when I started homeschooling. I love people even more than I did before, too.

You get it, I support homeschooling 100%, but I wouldn't automatically tell you it's the way to go. Are you willing to sacrifice a lot of time with people for a smaller amount of time with people you really like? Do you have the means to get a good education at home? That's the most important thing. I do online courses like Silver Dragon does, I pretty much teach myself. All my dad has to do is make sure I am learning.

I would definately say it's a good choice that's worth considering. Hope you make a good decision. smile
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 2:33pm

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Bryce007

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Arktic wrote:

I've never went to public or private school. I'm 22.
Obviously, Bryce, you're socially inept and you can't read or write.

Obviously.
God. I think that just made my day.


[Arktic's deadpan FTW]
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 4:11pm

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Merrick

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Also, if you're worried about getting a good education, there are plenty of ways to at home. For middle and lower-school home schoolers, it does sort of depend of how good a teacher your parent is, but as a high schooler, I believe that you should be able to pretty much teach yourself from a curriculum that is given to you. It's similar to the way you'll learn in college and makes you budget your time to get assignments in when they are due. You have to think for yourself, not just get shoved around to different classes and have everything planned out for you.

What I'm saying is that a good education at home can give you skills that will be useful later in life that you don't get from a normal school. Look at people when they just get out of school; they're usually fine socially, but often they don't know how to budget their time and money. They still expect to be spoon fed life by other people.

To concede my point, I have known one homeschooler in my area who had a hard time finding Australia on a globe. That's the extreme of a bad education; does he learn anything? Also, I'm sure there are many homeschoolers who are isolated, possibly intentionally, from the real world. When we started homeschooling, our parents made it clear that they wouldn't try to hide us from anything, so, when I went to drivers ed, I wasn't really that suprised by the kids next to me who chewed tobacco.

I also am in a program called Duke TIP. It finds the young kids who scored the highest on the SAT or ACT and gives them the opportunity to be part of a three week camp where you study college level courses. This summer, I studied Philosophy at Duke University. I loved it and think that I am going to be every bit ready for college. I'm not meaning to brag here, but just to defend homeschooling as a possible route to take.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 4:50pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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I've never *left school* physically. But somewhere along the road I realized Norwegian education is boldly said; Crappy. I mean, I am a musician, but I've had none formal education when it comes to music through school. A few years ago I realized I had to put my education in my own hands.

The quality of study at school or at home mostly depends on the student and the environment. You're not getting far if you don't have anyone to answer your questions. That's where school comes in handy.

I support Merrick at this subject. One of my main reasons is the norwegian school-system and why any home-schooling beats that. I know home-schooling is just as good, if not even better in many cases. I've been there myself.. Kind of. As Merrick said, you need to think more on your own. And school also kills creativity, and thats *A FACT*.. -_-' That's not very useful for writers, musicians and all other forms of art.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 5:39pm

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Frosty G

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Uhh, my school didn't kill my creativity. In fact, I'd say it helped build it.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 6:10pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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Well, most school does of those I've seen neutral cool No I'm not saying all schools are bad smile Just mentioning homeschooling is often more suited for some people than schools.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 6:18pm

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The Siege

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I believe we don't even have the ability to be homeschooled here in Holland . We have a law that states you have to go to school until the age of 16, and I think every country has that, but most of the "rich kids" also go to public schools just because they have to.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 8:02pm

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Merrick

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Your right, Tommy. I can't stress enough how much school can kill creativity in kids. There are some who can stay creative, but it's very hard. I was actally thought of as the science kid in school, but when I left, my creative side just exploded. I'm much happier when I'm creating, also.

I think that no one can build schools and find teachers at the rate that students in need of an education keep coming. As a result, most schools seem to me to give fairly poor educations and, even Gundersen said, crappy ones. In my area, I know that's true, our county has one of the worst school systems in the state. I'm really dissapointed with what I see. To use drivers edu. as an example again, people were getting 70's and 80's and lower on the final exams. I got 94%, and think that everyone should go for 100%. I would reccomend homeschooling to you if you were at all into the arts.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 8:11pm

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Atom

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Merrick World wrote:

Your right, Tommy. I can't stress enough how much school can kill creativity in kids. There are some who can stay creative, but it's very hard. I was actally thought of as the science kid in school, but when I left, my creative side just exploded. I'm much happier when I'm creating, also.
Creativity is the biggest thing I've honed in school, and one reason I think this statement is completely objective and, to me, completely wrong. Not only have I been able to foster my creativity with a load of teachers and get graded to do it, but more frequently I've been able to build relationships with others in my school I had never talked to and likely (more like absolutely) never would have as they live 30 minutes away from me and I likely wouldn't run into them by chance in a city of millions. And don't come back at me with "I said it can", either. Because frankly, it isn't "very hard" to foster creativity in school, as you say. That's for everyone, not just the people you say.

And look, now they're a vital part of Atomic Productions and the group continues to grow. I'll hit the rest of this later. Gotta go, the bell just rang and I'm throwin it down in public school.

Out of School! YAY! smile

To put it plainly, though, I don't think there really is any "homeschooling is better for some people" mess. And I'll be stubborn on this point, really. I'm not trying to offend anyone, but honestly, I think school and school interaction are necessary fundamentals to everyone in a society. If not merely for learning, than for meeting people by chance and having to work with people you might not otherwise and foster relationships. It isn't easy, it isn't always even favorable, but I think in the end it's always for the better. This isn't even to mention how school affects one's looks and reaction with authority. As, in homeschooling, there essentially is none but your parents. Whereas with regular schooling, you've got a multitude of authority on many different levels in addition to your parents. That's how I've been told the real world works, and I'm happy I've been prepared.

This coming from a white kid that grew up in the worst urban area in the city and went to some of the lowest and some of the highest-ranked schools in the district. I wouldn't trade any of it for anything else, be it a conditioned-environment private school or homeschooling. And I'm not even a very enduring person, I'll say it.

I don't agree with homeschooling, and I think I've said this before. Although I generally try to be more welcoming to it, since there's finally a topic on it I thought I'd address it fully finally.

I think it's also a lack of faith in the education system. I've had some real stinker teachers, but I've had far more in far better quality and influence 'good teachers', and I've gone to public school my entire life. I'm a firm believer in it. And I'm white and Christian, if that makes any case for people in private school or homeschooling.

Past that, I don't want to get into to some of the defaming statements about public/regular schooling- as they've been made generally by people who have had little to no real and/or current interaction with schooling to begin with. I think the severity of statements in much greater measure could be made against homeschooling, but I'll refrain from that. From here, I'll just echo my brother's statements and add this:

Ben and I have both had quality educations and fostered innumerable friendships, and have never paid a direct dime or stayed at home for any of it.
Posted: Tue, 27th Nov 2007, 11:45pm

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Merrick

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First of all, Atom, thank you for being calm and backing up your points and not just bursting out against homeschooling.

You're partially right. I do have a lot of friends who are in public school and can give me lots of creative ideas whan I need them. If you're trying to tell me that school encourages creativity, I'm going to laugh, because it rarely ever does, not nearly as much as homeschooling. You and your friends seem to have been very creative people from the start. Also, because you have a group of other creative people at school with you, it is easier to fend off the aspects of school that kill creativity. Basically, it isn't your school that's honing your creativity, it's yourself. Nothing's wrong with that, though. You seem to be having a lot of fun in school, so stay in school; I myself much prefer homeschooling.

School isn't the only way to meet people, either. I've run in to lots of people who are good friends to me outside of school. Also, once you've formed your own group in school, you really don't meet many new people, that's how it went for me at least, maybe not for you.

Past that, I don't want to get into to some of the defaming statements about public/regular schooling- as they've been made generally by people who have had little to no real and/or current interaction with schooling to begin with.
Remember that the opposite is true too. You have little to no experience with homeschooling, so can't really make any statements about homeschooling that are backed with your own experience.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 4:20am

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Klausky

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Merrick World wrote:

I do agree that I don't see people as much as I would like, but I took drivers education at a public high school just a few weeks ago and there was no one there that I would really want to be friends with.
I have a hard time really believing this. Did you take the time to use your "social skills" to get to know the new people around you? Part of being in a situation like that -- the common fish out of water allusion -- is to be able to find others who you can get along with. You may be able to score well on the SATs, have a strong "textbook" prowess, and in the end, most likely live a successful life. But personal success is only so tasty. A victory celebrated amongst peers or friends is the sweetest. I believe interacting with classmates each day is not only quality fun but also offers the greatest education in terms of gathering the necessary social skills for a fruitful adulthood.

Has anyone ever seen "Blast from the Past" with Brendan Fraser.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 5:43am

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Atom

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Merrick World wrote:

If you're trying to tell me that school encourages creativity, I'm going to laugh, because it rarely ever does, not nearly as much as homeschooling.
This statement is particularly humorous, as not only is it (again, in my mind) entirely and completely wrong; but it is said with such a naivety of someone who, if I know correctly, has never actually attended high school. Now, I know it changes from school to school and person to person, but I can say with almost absolute certainty that I don't have to have been in homeschool to know how it is- where I can also say with almost absolute certainty the same isn't true the other way around. You can only speculate the interactions and relationships of others and strangers in a different environment to such a degree without actually being there. Another problem to not fostering friendships within school, or at least not going to school with them while you're homeschooled, is that for 7 hours (more or less) each day you're handing out time you could have with your friends. And while you could possibly go make movies, they're still in school. Which you may think is great, and that's good for you. But in my experience, nothing is ever lastingly fun when you're doing it by yourself. Especially filmmaking.

And to put more, let's call it, perspective on this:

Yes, it's true. I've been enrolled in public school my entire life. But there was a point, in 7th grade, when I got very, very sick and left for an extended time intermittently until it became full-time. This went on for a little under all of the second semester. During this time, I made several movies, yes, and drew and sketched and did my school work at home and online and read instead of being taught. And frankly, I didn't hate it. It was, for some time, quite enjoyable. But something was missing, something monumental, and that was the social element. Inspiration can come from anywhere, it's true, but I guarantee you more often than not you have to be somewhere, around someone for that to happen. I've been through that experience, I have, and I can say homeschooling is not the way to go, ever.

I've had bad days at school, I'm not going to lie. But you endure, you don't cave in. My cousin is fairly socially inept, and he's 3. And his parents want to homeschool him once he's old enough so he won't be ridiculed. I laugh in my head, really. How is someone ever to overcome this problem if they are never actually introduced to the environment where they have the capacity to? All sheltering is going to do is prolong it.


Klausky wrote:

Merrick World wrote:

I do agree that I don't see people as much as I would like, but I took drivers education at a public high school just a few weeks ago and there was no one there that I would really want to be friends with.
I have a hard time really believing this. Did you take the time to use your "social skills" to get to know the new people around you? Part of being in a situation like that -- the common fish out of water allusion -- is to be able to find others who you can get along with. You may be able to score well on the SATs, have a strong "textbook" prowess, and in the end, most likely live a successful life. But personal success is only so tasty. A victory celebrated amongst peers or friends is the sweetest. I believe interacting with classmates each day is not only quality fun but also offers the greatest education in terms of gathering the necessary social skills for a fruitful adulthood.

Has anyone ever seen "Blast from the Past" with Brendan Fraser.
Absolutely. Spot-on, Klausky. To add insult to injury, that's really just the prime example of real life, working with people and building friendships and relationships with people you may never have even talked to or didn't even want to.

Even better, I too didn't like the people in my driver's education class, which was taught in the morning before school by my hard-as-nails golf instructor. This was my second year in highschool, mind you, but I still had a very cold-shoulder-relationship and attitude with another student in it, whom I guess I had a falling out with when there never was an "in". (if that makes sense) But guess what? I put myself out there and talked to him, during a very tense situation in a closed environment (a non-sedan driver's ed car, more specifically), and became friends with the guy. Pretty close to best friends, actually, as he's one of my closest confidants at school and the same scenario still continues with new people.

Closer to your side even: my brother, Ben (obviously), took driver's ed at my school with people he had never met in an environment he was never in with a teacher he didn't know. Going from a small school environment with people we've both known since 4th or 5th grade to this is quite a shock. And the people weren't welcoming, either. And like I said before, this is with a strict teacher in a quiet and tense environment where I wasn't able even to introduce him to the few people I remotely knew of in the class. And guess what again? He did just fine, too. My good friend asks how he is quite frequently, based merely off meeting him at a few driver's ed sessions.

That's not even being outgoing, that's being social.

And yes Klausky, I've seen 'Blast from the Past'. Quite a terrific movie, although only half of a good example for this debate, as Fraser in the movie is also conditioned to be incredibly outgoing.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 6:35am

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SilverDragon7

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I'm not gonna read everything, because that would take to long. Instead I'm just gonna say I'm the exception to the homeschoolers without a High-School experince because many-a-people know who I am throughout my county (I've also lived here for 16 years and 5 months). I've found others ways to have the social experince that high schoolers get. SO all I have to say is, if you wanna go homeschooled, go homeschooled, if you don't (after all this conversation), then don't.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 6:38am

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Atom

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SilverDragon7 wrote:

I've found others ways to have the social experince that high schoolers get.
I'm sorry, Silver, but I still find this hard to believe. I'm a firm believer that you really can't fake a high school experience.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 6:42am

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SilverDragon7

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Atom wrote:

SilverDragon7 wrote:

I've found others ways to have the social experince that high schoolers get.
I'm sorry, Silver, but I still find this hard to believe. I'm a firm believer that you really can't fake a high school experience.
I'm not saying the whole high school experince, just the average parts of the experince high schoolers get.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 6:48am

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Atom

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SilverDragon7 wrote:

Atom wrote:

SilverDragon7 wrote:

I've found others ways to have the social experince that high schoolers get.
I'm sorry, Silver, but I still find this hard to believe. I'm a firm believer that you really can't fake a high school experience.
I'm not saying the whole high school experince, just the average parts of the experince high schoolers get.
But how are you for certain? The 'experience' is the experience, really. No 'average' or others. The reason I say this, is I'm of the belief you're able to understand the workings and interactions of a homeschool life without fully having it yourself, but not the other way around. I've met quite a few homeschool kids, all of who sadly play into the stereotype that they are all socially-inept freaks, and all have claimed to have the high school experience, when all have obviously been far from it.

And graduating this year and moving onto college, I can see oh how important it is. And I can't wait to see the homeschool kids come. How are they even ranked for college applications, I wonder? smile

Ranked 1st out of 1? smile (Kidding, kidding.) But seriously. wink
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 9:30am

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Simon K Jones

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Atom wrote:

my hard-as-nails golf instructor
Hehehe. There's something very amusing about that concept.

Anyway, there's an awful lot of generalisations flying around here, about both homeschooling and, er, schoolschooling.

The main thing I wanted to comment on was the silly claim that schools stifle creativity. I'm sure some schools are pretty awful, but the ones I've attended in my life, some in the UK and some in Italy, were all excellent at encouraging creativity.

I can confidently say that my interest in art and drama would never have come about without a highly supportive and encouraging environment at school, and some really inspirational teachers. My writing was also always encouraged and improved drastically thanks to regular spot-on comments from teachers.

In terms of creativity, school was great.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 11:06am

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Tommy Gundersen

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Guys! Stop fighting -_-' This is really a very subjective topic. It's actually turned up into something silly. Some people like strawberries, someone don't. For some people homeschooling seem more fit, for most people it don't. There are mixes too. I believe both is great in it's own way, and there's a lot of dependencies on everything. Disagree as much as you want, but I say both works. If you're really in the mood of arguing, pleace pick up the thread about why someone like strawberries and someone don't. I'm sure that's as interesting as this opinion-filled discussion.

EDIT: Oh yes don't take me wrong. You probably don't look at it as argues/fighting at all. Just making my point people really do have different opinions so it's no point saying "school sucks" or "homeschooling sucks" thats a personal meaning, yes I said and will say it myself. But don't argue to one another his/her opinion is wrong.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 12:08pm

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Bryce007

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But let me also say, I got very, very lucky.

I actually just did Correspondence School (Via the mail), and I had far too crazy of social life to say I missed anything. Hell, I attended a huge amount of our Highschool's functions and I had loads of friends from there.

(Except, unlike them, I was finished with school at noon)


HOWEVER... (Insert evil theme music here)

I absolutely agree that most homeschoolers are pretty damn weird. Seriously. They might be unusually smart, but they make up for it in how quirky and social inept they are.

Infact, I can't recall hanging out with any homeschoolers after 6th grade... They were just too odd.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 1:08pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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Haha smile Yeah but we're all a little odd on our own way, aren't we. smile
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 2:21pm

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Merrick

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I know some pretty weird homeschoolers, too. biggrin

We really should stop with the stereotypes, like Tarn said. Homeschoolers have been stereotyped in this thread, and I'll admit that I've made quite a few generallizations about "schoolschooling" that are only based on the school system in my area.

I by no means had a bad experience in school, I just am having a better one being homeschooled. I am aware that the school system is unusually bad where I live. In surrounding cities and counties, the schools seem much better.

That said, who else likes strawberries? biggrin
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 2:38pm

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Rockfilmers

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I love being home scholled, and I have lots of freinds! The best part is you get to chose your own classes and your hobbies get turned into credits to graduate! I have been home schooled from third grade and love it. I've had people tell me I'm stupid to my face because I'm home schooled, but I'm way s,arter than them (Sry, I'm not wanting this to sound ckoky). The only thing that I'm dumb at is spelling. Every one that I know that was home schooled and then went to puplic school hated it (but it's probably because they weren't used to it), but kids that I know that were in puplic school and then became home schooled liked it. And one more thing, I cna't even say thank you God (I don't mean in vain, like saying oh my god, I mean like realy saying thank you God) with out getting in trouble.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 6:16pm

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PSFreak

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I've been homeschooled my entire life and I don't really see myself as socially backwards. I have a lot of friends that go to regular school, and one that is homeschooled, but most homeschoolers are a bit... strange...
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 7:43pm

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Atom

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First off, I'm frightfully surprised by the overwhelming number of homeschool kids regularly on these forums. No wonder they're on so much! smile

Rockfilmers wrote:

I love being home scholled, and I have lots of freinds! The best part is you get to chose your own classes and your hobbies get turned into credits to graduate!
I don't know how to say this nicely, but you're going to have a tough, tough time in college. I mean, really. It's great to a point to form things and work how you want, but society simply isn't that way and neither is college. Again, something becoming more and more obvious to me. While you can, to an extent, choose the major and courses you take, there's an amount of convetionalism in higher education that requires you to take certain things in a specific way.

Another thing I'm happy school has prepared me for.

I have been home schooled from third grade and love it. I've had people tell me I'm stupid to my face because I'm home schooled, but I'm way s,arter than them (Sry, I'm not wanting this to sound ckoky).
Hehe, homeschool kids. Always thinking their education is superior. smile (I'm pretty 's,art' myself.)

I cna't even say thank you God (I don't mean in vain, like saying oh my god, I mean like realy saying thank you God) with out getting in trouble.
If you're talking about public school, you're entirely wrong. You have every right to say that personally, and no one can prohibit you. That's one of the fundamentals of American law. If anyone has told you to stop or if you've gotten in trouble (which, again I believe is an exaggeration, as it would seriously be called into question immediately if it wasn't) then you needed to tell someone. I'm able to say 'god' if I want to in school, public school.

That's a lame reason against, if that's what you were getting out.

PSFreak wrote:

I've been homeschooled my entire life and I don't really see myself as socially backwards. I have a lot of friends that go to regular school, and one that is homeschooled, but most homeschoolers are a bit... strange...
Hehe, are you sure you aren't a little....strange...yourself, eh, PSFreak? smile
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 8:10pm

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PSFreak

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har har smile. Maybe when I get more force I'll change it to PSenthusiast.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 8:11pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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Hehe you've got only good arguments, Atom smile I do agree you need the "official way of schooling" to have a better 'fighting-chance' if I'm to call it that. (Just watched Jet Li's Fearless, can't help think of fighting right now. ;}) Anyways, it is true you'd prefer going to school and not homeschooling if you want higher education, college etc. That's just how it is.

For the killing of creativity, it's not the schooling-system. It's often the teacher which gets very discouraging for the student sometimes. I'm not talking about all teachers. There are good teachers, and bad. Some is funny, someone are so boring it's a danger for the kids health.

My point is simple. Why do teachers continue to limit the student? "You can't write a poem like that." / "Don't sing like that. You have to stand like this, that's just the way it is."

I mean, if they say you can't do this, you can't do that, new / original products won't be... Original. My impression of the teachers I've experienced is they don't want me to think "new".

PS: This is still only my opinions. I bet people disagree with me, but I believe to some point, the student need to do some thinking for his/her own. If she get everything served on a silver-spoon, she'll get used to it. Home-schooling freaks do alot of thinking 'normal' students don't even know exist. 'Normal' students get more access to help & resources and lots of other things. I say, keep a mix of them both. Do go to school if you can, but don't forget to think -_-'

/Tommy Gundersen
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 8:30pm

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Fill

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Being a regular church attendee, I know lots and lots of homeschooled kids. Yes, they are very odd, and pretty socially inept. I only know one family that has what I would (Uh-oh bad word coming up!) stereotype as a 'normal' homeschooled kids.

Homeschooling in itself is fine. The one thing that makes my blood boil about it, is when parents hold their kids back from social lives because of the influence public schooled kids have on each other. I'll cruelly narrow this down, and point it at Christians too, sue me. I've seen so many Christian parents force homeschooling on their kids because of, "The world's bad influences on kids." Yes, there are influences of this world, but these people fail to realize that they are taking one of the most important parts of life away from their kids, their social life. I'm not saying all homeschooled kids have no social lives, but rather that I've seen so many kids get locked up in their homes. The thing is, some people are so obsessed with protecting their children, that the children become ultra sensitive to any form of "evil."

I went to a private school Kindergarten to 8th grade, and I have to say that even though four of my best friends were made there, I really had hardly a social life at all. Our graduating class was 18 people. And yes, I was weird. smile
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 8:43pm

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Serpent

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My cousins (who post on here) are very social. I mean, I don't want to speak for them, but they are on a high level swim team, interact with tons of kids their age, and are now on their area's high school swim team. I think parents or kids who feel like the kids should be homeschooled should push/be pushed to be social. Kids at high school who sit in the corner and go home to be by themselves all the time and don't attempt to be social will be just as socially awkward as a homeschooler who doesn't attempt to go out and be social. So basically my view is that I think it can be done right.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 9:14pm

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Mellifluous

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Interesting topic. I'll say why - I was homeschooled about 7 to 10, then 11 to 16.

If school does what it's supposed to, then I guess I'd push that more than homeschooling. But here in the UK, there are certain environments where I think homeschooling or home tuition could be beneficial. This is in problem areas where children are socially disadvantaged and e.g. live on council estates. For some reason, children in these areas have no aspiration and motivation, and home tuition could benefit them a lot more than a school where there are 100s of others like them with a huge amount of apathy.

In my own situation, I was hounded out of the school I went to after being accused of something I didn't do (age 7). When I denied this accusation, it became a bigger problem because I was perceived to be lying. Anyway, I left but returned to the same school a few years later after the culprits eventually confessed. This time back enforced my own view that I'd rather learn at home taught by my mum, and I left.

This doesn't mean I didn't socialise. I saw friends, went out, played in sports teams, did drama etc. And it didn't mean I was limited in further education. I took exams as an external candidate at a local school and then went to the same 6th form in the same year all my friends started. I did well there and went to a top university. According to the stereotypical view of homeschooling in this country, this shouldn't have happened. I know a couple homeschooled people but if you think weirdness doesn't strike schooled people, then you're going around with rose-tinted glasses on!

With both school and homeschool, motivation to do well is essential. I think though that if you're given one-to-one attention by someone who's skilled at encouraging learning, this seems more beneficial than being in a class of 30+ with no individual attention whatsoever. I was given little encouragement at school (age 11) so I think all I have achieved is due to going down a different route. As I said, on the whole I'd recommend school over homeschool but if there are problems with teachers/peers that aren't down to you, then maybe homeschooling is a good option to consider if it is practically feasible.
Posted: Wed, 28th Nov 2007, 11:18pm

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Merrick

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Atom wrote:


I don't know how to say this nicely, but you're going to have a tough, tough time in college. I mean, really. It's great to a point to form things and work how you want, but society simply isn't that way and neither is college. Again, something becoming more and more obvious to me. While you can, to an extent, choose the major and courses you take, there's an amount of convetionalism in higher education that requires you to take certain things in a specific way.
Colleges, at least where I live, are looking for homeschoolers. Colleges around us are always asking us to visit them and such.

Remember those three week camps? I've done it for two years in a row now. I was taking college courses on a college campus, doing what the teacher told me to, and spending virtually 100% of my time with other people my age. It was a blast.

Also, let me draw the line between socially inept and just not very into the culture of the day. I don't really listen to the popular bands, watch every movie that just came out, or any of that; but I do talk to people and make friends.

I agree completely to what Mellifluous said; if you're not motivated to learn, you're not going to learn, no matter what kind of school you're in.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 12:41am

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ben3308

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About this whole 'stifling creativity' thing:

In school, creativity has (and should have) its limits.

In my school district, there is one school notorious (or famous, however you'd like to see it) for having the most drug abuse, the most bisexual and transgender (not that this is necessarily bad, but at 14 or 15 it's hard for other non-LGBT to be around, especially since most at this school are sexually active)students, and the easiest coursework. This is called Booker T. Washington High School, and it breeds talents of many award-winning musicians and artists (Norah Jones, Angela Kinsey, and many more being notable examples). It is one of only a few 'magnets' in our school system, in that it can legally draw kids from different political districts into its own district.

Anyhow, this school is an 'anything goes' school. Academics are low, creativity is EXTREMELY high. Kids get to do a lot with the art they create. They can hone their talents at their own pace.

BUT....

They don't end up getting a great academic education. It's passable, but certainly not the best. Many of the graduates go to college, but many (a majority) do not.

Now, on the other side of the coin, you have my school, which is in a large building of six separate 'magnets'. My school has the highest college-continuance rate of the state at 100%. Class size is small, and we have no sports and are isolated from the other 5 schools in the building, which are actively involved with eachother. Other schools in the building have early release and 'intern' to leave school, we simply have extra coursework.

Math is encouraged, art often is not. By the time of graduation, students must have taken (and passed) anywhere between 9 and 19 AP classes, the former being required. This is higher than any school in the United States.

My school is the closest- discoursively and socially, at least- you can get to homeschool. And yet, even though it is not the hugely-renowned 'arts school' of the district, it is still the place where I discovered my interests in painting and in Photoshop, both of which I am now pretty adept at (or better than average, let me put it that way). School has been the vessel to unlock my creativity.

Hell, in middle school, my science teacher encouraged the HyperStudio projects my brother and I made, and our art teacher actually drove us to a communications high school so we could rent out a GL2 to practice using. This is why we've always championed the camera: it was the birth of our extended creativity video-wise (Splinter Cell and onward).

It is at school where I acquired the tools and abilities to do cinematography, paint pictures, and do movie posters, websites, and things in Photoshop. Also, remember when I used to post crazy MSPaint stuff on here? My 5th grade teacher encouraged I hone that talent, and now I'm pretty good at it.

In short, having teachers at my school who know something in their respective fields- and my interest in said fields, even if the teacher is not completely knowledgeable- has put me at a paramount advantage above homeschooled kids who only have their parents to encourage them. My parents do not know about cinematic arts, my middle school art teacher did. My parents do not know about Photoshop, my sophomore Web Mastery teacher did. It's all about being of enough wit to find the people you need at the places you need. Be smart at what you're trying to accomplish in school, and it will not stifle your creativity. There is always a way.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 3:24am

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Atom

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Merrick World wrote:

Atom wrote:


I don't know how to say this nicely, but you're going to have a tough, tough time in college. I mean, really. It's great to a point to form things and work how you want, but society simply isn't that way and neither is college. Again, something becoming more and more obvious to me. While you can, to an extent, choose the major and courses you take, there's an amount of convetionalism in higher education that requires you to take certain things in a specific way.
Colleges, at least where I live, are looking for homeschoolers. Colleges around us are always asking us to visit them and such.
I'm not talking about getting into college, which I find very difficult for anyone. If not as hard for homeschool kids, good for you for being a lucky minority, I guess. You just saved yourself some possible anuerisms and ulcers from that stuff. smile

Also, let me draw the line between socially inept and just not very into the culture of the day.
Let me draw the line for you then: culture of the day is a facet of society, and you should know that. Although I'll agree it is nowhere near as important as the rest of the stuff. But I never gave any real negative or specific examples of socially ineptness to begin with so I don't see reason to draw the distinction between the two.

I think being socially inept, or close to it, is just that. It's a curious thing that doesn't have a single hearth; be it knowledge of pop culture, outgoingness, friendliness, being approachable, knowing what to say, etc. It's all of those things in varying degrees.

I agree completely to what Mellifluous said; if you're not motivated to learn, you're not going to learn, no matter what kind of school you're in.
I would agree with this too, but we haven't been discussing learning. We've been discussing creativity and society/social barriers. And as far as that goes, I still think it's very important to be pre-conditioned to that real life/college experience in high school-school.

I'm not saying some people might 'feel' better suited in homeschool, they very well might be more comfortable there. I'm just saying, overall, I think it is always in the best interest of the student to attend school-school.

It may not immediately be favorable, and that's understandable (something Tommy touched on), but I believe it's for the best in the end. Really.

And for those saying they're the exception to the stereotype; as with everything, of course, there are 'exceptions'. But with the growing and almost majority number of past or present homeschool students on here, of which I'm quite surprised, I don't think there are that many exceptions, and that they're all on this forum at the same time, either.

Some homeschool people on here, and I haven't an exact clue who, must not realize how/who they really are. As I'm sure the same is true for some school-school people.

Not me though, as I've always been very cool. wink
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 4:08am

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Merrick

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Ben, that honestly does seem like a really neat school that you go to. As far as the other, notorious one, it seems to me that artist types do often have problems.

It is not doing less science and math and more humanities that ultimately boosts your creativiy, I think; it's the atmosphere in which you work. I for one actually spend most of my day working on science and math. My dad doesn't let me shape my education completely around what I like, (which I'm sure is what I would involuntarily do if he wasn't there to stop me), so I end up getting a pretty broad education, even being homeschooled.

Atom, I agree with you about society being a many faceted thing, and I agree that culture of the day is one of those facets. I start disagreeing with you when you say that going to school is always in the best interest of the student. This just sounds far too cut and dry to me. I agree that school is right for most people, but to say that homeschooling is right for none? Anyway, I've already discussed all that in other posts. We could argue until the end of time and I'm absolutely sure that neither of us would be convinced. I've got to go to bed now; see ya. biggrin

Atom wrote:

Some homeschool people on here, and I haven't an exact clue who, must not realize how/who they really are.
Really, I don't think that I knew who I was until I started homschooling.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 5:34am

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ben3308

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Merrick, my schools is ranked as the number one public school in the United States by Newsweek.

We have been for three consecutive years now. "SEM", another 'magnet' in my building, was number two last year. Unfortunately, SEM is the closest you can get in my entire city to homeschooling.

Some kids talk bad (and, more often than not, blanket stereotypically) about my school's students being socially inept (and not to sound like the only 'cool' exception, but I'm one of the many in my school to opt out of the 'TAG-only' classes and socialize in building-wide classes) but the kids in SEM make no exceptions, and are extremely, extremely elitist and weird.

I like the lack of generally stupid people in my school (really the only thing that bugs me about public school, tons of them in half my classes which are [thankfully] building-wide) but due to the small class size and high amount of 'genius' kids, class ranks and 'top ten' percentages are competitive and administration is small; meaning the college application process is, well, a total b*tch.

I have a 90 and am ranked 28th. The top 10% is 3.5 people. I have very, very little chance of getting into even the state university. I just thank God I got a 33 on the ACT.

Regrettably, most of my friends and I wish we'd all followed my brother and gone to his school, as we'd be in top 10% status and able to automatically get into a lot of colleges. My math teachers (I have two yearly, at least) all mock me, calling me 'three arts classes kid', but I still, in a way, love my school. It's a pretty cool place.

But I still can't imagine being homeschooled. With those type of kids it's that catch-22 thing: because I've been 'near' schooled awkwardly from my school, I have sense enough to know my school is awkward. But most homeschooled kids I know (make that all) fall into the catch in that they don't realize how far-gone and out of the ordinary they actually are.

Aaaaaand that's the end of my long post about my school.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 4:10pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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...I like strawberries... razz



No really, I don't really know many home schoolers in real life, so I can't really say how they are, can I? Oi, that was many really'es lol. Anyways!

I kind of like the meaning of "you become what you eat" here. Probably an awkward example, but really (again), in the end it's up to your motivation & interest that decides how much you learn. My theory is it's better to leave school with low grades and have learned a lot than vice versa, though large numbers help getting further. Makes no sense again I guess.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 7:32pm

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Merrick

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Tommy Gundersen wrote:

I kind of like the meaning of "you become what you eat" here. Probably an awkward example, but really (again), in the end it's up to your motivation & interest that decides how much you learn. My theory is it's better to leave school with low grades and have learned a lot than vice versa, though large numbers help getting further. Makes no sense again I guess.
Wow, I had to read that a few times. biggrin You have given a lot of food analogys on this thread so far, haven't you. biggrin

Ben, if I had the opportunity to go to one of the top schools in the country, I'm almost sure I wouldn't pass that opportunity up. That clears it all up for me. As I have said before, where I live the education standard is very low, making homeschooling look like a very good alternative to many people. In the four years since I left school, I have watched peoples reaction to homeschoolers in my area go from shunning to a certain level of respect.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 8:03pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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...I love food.. Don't mock me.
Posted: Thu, 29th Nov 2007, 8:57pm

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Merrick

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I love food, too. Didn't I agree with you that strawberries were good? biggrin lol
Posted: Fri, 30th Nov 2007, 4:24am

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Rockfilmers

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OK, let me just say, does it metter if you are schooled at home or in pulic school as long as you get the same education? I don't think that my education is supperior ( look, I can't even spell smile ) because I'm home schooled, I said that I've had people come to me and say that I'm stupid because I'm home schooled. As long as you get the same education (which I do, if not better, besides spelling smile). I just want to point out that it's kind of arogant to say that home schoolers have a bad social life and that they have a hard time going through college when you have never gone through it.
Posted: Fri, 30th Nov 2007, 4:31am

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ben3308

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Rockfilmers, it's not arrogant at all, just observatory: nobody is trying to overbearingly say that the lesser social life is true of all homeschooled kids.

However, every single homeschooled student I have met in person has proven themselves to me to be socially inept. I do not have to be in someone's shoes to judge their sociability, as said trait is something that is abundantly obvious when they are in public; and it is viewable by anyone.

Not being able to make friends outside of their own domain, not wanting to socialize with non-homeschooled children, even when offered it by another- these are all things I, in my findings at least, have found typical of homeschooled children. Such observations have even been confirmed in this very thread, where a homeschooled student expressed his disdain for the kids in his driver's ed class.

In fact, Bryce and SilverDragon are really the only two homeschooled kids I have been able to talk to without catching that 'homeschooled' vibe. I mean no offense by this, I am just pointing out that by being withheld from a public school system, kids are starved of social interaction and are therefore faced with social insecurities that stand out to regularly-schooled kids.

I want to further my point by saying that most of what I am saying is a generalization (albeit, an extremely accurate one) and that my views continue to be broken on this issue.
Posted: Fri, 30th Nov 2007, 7:05am

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BlueSmudge

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ben3308 wrote:


I want to further my point by saying that most of what I am saying is a generalization (albeit, an extremely accurate one)
I totally agree with everything you are saying, but...wow.
Posted: Fri, 30th Nov 2007, 7:44am

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ben3308

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Wow, what?

To be more concise, even though what I am saying is, from my own experiences very true and accurate, it is still a generalization; making my views subject to change on a case-by-case basis.
Posted: Fri, 30th Nov 2007, 4:19pm

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drspin98

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I know people learn/work in different ways, and to some kids for whatever reason school is a very tough time, but for me I would never give up my school experiences for anything.
Posted: Fri, 30th Nov 2007, 9:47pm

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Merrick

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ben3308 wrote:

Not being able to make friends outside of their own domain, not wanting to socialize with non-homeschooled children, even when offered it by another- these are all things I, in my findings at least, have found typical of homeschooled children. Such observations have even been confirmed in this very thread, where a homeschooled student expressed his disdain for the kids in his driver's ed class.
There is some hostility coming from both sides here. I actually talk to quite a few public schooled kids; it's just that when I'm in a classroom with them and they already know each other very well, it's hard to fit in, sort of as said earlier, like a fish out of water. It took me about a week before I really started to socialize with the other students. I did sociallize and find friends, though. What I meant was that I didn't find anyone who I wanted as a true, lifelong friend. I bet there were a few in the school, though, if not in that very driver's ed. class. It was not like any of the other kids actually tried to be friends with me at first, either. I don't blame them at all, though, I would have done exactly the same. Some hostility must be expected when someone new enters an already well-formed group. The reason that I used Driver's ed. as an example so much is because it's the only direct experience I have with public high school.
Posted: Sat, 1st Dec 2007, 6:16am

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Atom

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Merrick World wrote:

What I meant was that I didn't find anyone who I wanted as a true, lifelong friend.
Then, quite honestly, you're expecting way too much out of one aspect of school, and to me it isn't giving it a fair chance. Which I guess you have every right to do, but it's just not me- if that makes any sense.
Posted: Sat, 1st Dec 2007, 8:57am

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Mellifluous

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ben3308 wrote:

However, every single homeschooled student I have met in person has proven themselves to me to be socially inept. I do not have to be in someone's shoes to judge their sociability, as said trait is something that is abundantly obvious when they are in public; and it is viewable by anyone.

Not being able to make friends outside of their own domain, not wanting to socialize with non-homeschooled children, even when offered it by another- these are all things I, in my findings at least, have found typical of homeschooled children. Such observations have even been confirmed in this very thread, where a homeschooled student expressed his disdain for the kids in his driver's ed class.

In fact, Bryce and SilverDragon are really the only two homeschooled kids I have been able to talk to without catching that 'homeschooled' vibe. I mean no offense by this, I am just pointing out that by being withheld from a public school system, kids are starved of social interaction and are therefore faced with social insecurities that stand out to regularly-schooled kids.
You're right, these are generalising a tad. I've met one other homeschooler who I've thought was a little "eccentric", but then again he's a science freak and went to Cambridge. Otherwise, I'm a bit dubious about these obvious social insecurities that are so easy to detect particularly in homeschooled people. In the UK, I am aware that some homeschooling parents do meet up with other homeschooling parents for their kids to socialise that way. I didn't do that, but don't people separate themselves into cliques all the time to the exclusion of others?

Everyone needs socialisation, but it's not an automatic byproduct of going to school. Are you saying school doesn't foster social insecurities too? Does going to school mean one's socialised enough to not kill, be upset, obey social rules etc etc? Are there not people in school who appear socially backward, have a small or zero circle of friends? Whether one homeschools or not, it's up to the individual to seek out social opportunities. School hands that opportunity on a plate but tons of factors (including an individual's own circumstances) are going to determine how successful it is.
Posted: Sat, 1st Dec 2007, 1:22pm

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Merrick

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Atom wrote:

Merrick World wrote:

What I meant was that I didn't find anyone who I wanted as a true, lifelong friend.
Then, quite honestly, you're expecting way too much out of one aspect of school, and to me it isn't giving it a fair chance. Which I guess you have every right to do, but it's just not me- if that makes any sense.
I'll change that to a friend who - how do I say it - is a friend because their a friend, not because they just happen to be in the same row in the same class as me. As I said, though, if I stayed at the school all day and went to a number of classes, I would probably find one or two like that, but I already have one or two being homeschooled.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:12am

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Thrawn

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Okay, I know I'm a little late in joining the conversation, and I haven't read everyones posts, but here is my opinion.

I've been homeschooled most of my life, and I don't mind it. I'm in a what they call "Independent Study Program" with a school and it's fine by me. I just wanted to say that those who have been homeschooled their whole lives are not any less social then those who go to public/private schools. I mean, I have a lot of friends (believe it or not) that are not homeschooled. Don't put it down until you've tried it.

I'm planning on going to private school again next year or the year after for the experience, and I'll let you all know if I have the same opinion.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:16am

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Waser

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my public school had bats, and our lunch lady got shot (on school grounds) and we had three teachers arrested/fired for sleeping with students (one of whom was in It's Coming). But I would never trade my life experiences there.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:23am

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Thrawn

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Waser wrote:

my public school had bats, and our lunch lady got shot (on school grounds) and we had three teachers arrested/fired for sleeping with students (one of whom was in It's Coming). But I would never trade my life experiences there.
Oh really..uh.. that's... nice.......

Someone get a doctor! This man has gone mad!
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:33am

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Atom

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Thrawn wrote:


Someone get a doctor! This man has gone mad!
Or he's had actual social experience, and understands the importance of it. It's a bit of a stretch to claim with complete certainty you've had the equivalent social experience of one in regular school, too. By logic even, you wouldn't, as for 7 hours a day you are distanced from others. Even if you're friends with public school kids, that means you aren't even talking to them the majority of, well, the year. You know, because, they're in school most of the time.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:40am

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Thrawn

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I was just kidding about the doctor thing Atom, no need to turn it against me and make it into an argument.

Also, I never meant to claim to have equivalent social experience to those in public school, my last post just came out wrong. My point was that homeschoolers are not freakin hermits lying in the corner of there garage shunning the light as well as other people, but infact that us homeschoolers have lots of social activities. I'm homeschooled, and yet I still play on the football team, and spend time with my teamates every day of the summer and fall and every other day in the off season. I do activities like Speech, and church activities, and I also help out with alot of things like AWANA. So, my point is that we are social, not shut-ins.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:45am

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Atom

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Well, my question from there then is:

If you do so much with these people, why not attend school with them?
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 5:50am

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Thrawn

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Wow, Atom, I guess you didn't read my first post in this thread...

I wrote:

I'm planning on going to private school next year or the year after for the experience, and I'll let you all know if I have the same opinion.
So, yes, I'm trying school soon. Maybe you should try homeschooling, Atom, just to make it fair. lol Like I said before, don't put it down until you've tried it.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 6:11pm

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I have friends that are from school and one that's homeschooled.But I still get to see or talk to my friends that go to school a lot because of sports, IMing, church, summer, and hanging out after school.
Posted: Mon, 3rd Dec 2007, 8:04pm

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CX3

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Thrawn wrote:

Wow, Atom, I guess you didn't read my first post in this thread...

I wrote:

I'm planning on going to private school next year or the year after for the experience, and I'll let you all know if I have the same opinion.
So, yes, I'm trying school soon. Maybe you should try homeschooling, Atom, just to make it fair. lol Like I said before, don't put it down until you've tried it.
Hell, it might help him with his ability to read wink
Posted: Wed, 5th Dec 2007, 2:57am

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Tommy92L

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Bump #2 hehe. Im getting real mad. Ive had numerous sick days this year, what can I do, just Not Be Sick? They comment on me and shit about being absent. I think its the fact that I catch the bus at 6:30, and Im just not in good shape, with no resistance. Im gonna try HSing after Xmas break. This school is loaded with Dbags, I hate it.
Posted: Wed, 5th Dec 2007, 4:54am

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FreshMentos

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Are you in Middle school? Because If you are, that explains why you hate your school. I think that Junior high was the worst experience of my life.

Kid/idiot at school: "Hey, now since I'm 13 and all grown up I can say f*** you! haha! I'm so cool now because I'm going through puberty!

Me: "I hate middle school..."

Trust me, I wanted to do home school too but I decided to finish 8th grade. It was over before I knew it. And yes, High school is sooo much better. smile
Posted: Wed, 5th Dec 2007, 11:48am

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Tommy92L

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No, i H.A.T.E highschool
Posted: Wed, 5th Dec 2007, 12:50pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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I *L*O*V*E* school, *H*A*T*E* the teachers. biggrin
Posted: Tue, 11th Dec 2007, 5:44pm

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Travis Kunze

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Okay, im proballey realy late replying to this topic, but i am homeschooled, and its the best thing that has ever happen to me. My life has gotten so much better since i left Public School, and i still have a social life by choice, with friends from Work, boy scouts, church Youth Group, i have been friends with another homeschooler for almost Six years i think, who left about a year ago to go to collage, and we are still the best of friends, but i guess everyone has a different opinion, so thats mine, home schooling is a good idea in my opinion.