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100,000 budget...What to Buy? -UPDATE -

Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 5:15am

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Dancamfx

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Alright so my friend and I are working on a Documentary that is about to get picked up. I cant tell you much about the Documentary itself because we are currently in the middle of setting up a contract. For a budget, we have been told we can get UP TO $50,000 for the documentary. The question I have for you guys is what should we spend our budget on? We're filming it with a Canon XH-A1 if that helps. We Need lighting for sure because we have zero lighting equipment other then our ghetto homemade stuff.

All I can tell you about the Documentary is that we will be filming live Performances by a band, Interviews, and behind the stage footage.

If there is anything else you guys need to know about the Doc that will help you choose the gear or equipment needed just let me know.

UPDATE:
Ok so Our budget has been increased from $50,000 to $100,000 and I do know where we will be traveling on tour.

First we hit the west coast and then return home.

Next the East Coast and then return Home.

Then we're off to Europe and return home.

And last but not least, and I must add my favorite destination, IRAQ. The performer we are doing the doc on will be performing in a USO concert.

Also I must add that all of the filming will be done by the middle of summer and editing will begin in August.

Now heres the new problem Ive got. My friend whos running the show wants to purchase 2 of these new JVC HD Cameras.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/497873-REG/JVC_GYHD250U_GY_HD250U_Professional_HDV_Camcorder.html

I agree they're nice cameras but Im not sure they're what we should get. I think not only are they too expensive but they're too big to be lugging around. What do you guys think? Also, what HD cameras would you guys recommend for this Doc?

Last edited Fri, 7th Mar 2008, 5:13pm; edited 4 times in total.

Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 5:48am

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FreshMentos

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I'm no expert, so take my advice with a grain of salt. But, I'd say food would be really important for you and your crew (if you have one) and the people that you will be interviewing. Having friends with a full stomach during a shoot is a lifesaver!

I'll let the professionals here help you with the more technical stuff.

But wow, 50 grand. Congratulations with the deal. Good luck!
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 6:03am

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Axeman

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Well, if you are filming a live performance, and you have a camera, then you're going to want to get your hands on a crapload more cameras. Probably be better off renting than buying, but you're likely going to need to shoot a lot of simultaneous angles.
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 7:01am

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B3N

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Good quality Mics.

Food (as mentioned above)

Loads of cameras (also mentioned above)

Perhaps some stylish lens filtets to help give the scene some nice tinting without having to grade it too much. (What they do in Top Gear)

Headphones which you could rent out or just buy from a shop.

Lighting equipment if the scene needs some lighting.

Tripods

quite a few spare batterys for the cameras.
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 8:01am

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Avenging Eagle

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Might it also be an idea to NOT spend $50,000? You should always have a little money tucked away just incase things go over budget. Why not only spend $40,000? Companies like it when you come in under budget.

Just my 1.02135 pence.

AE
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 10:42am

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Arktic

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Rating: +1

Hey there,

I can't answer this question - it's way, way, way too vague.

There's no one 'super shopping list' for a programme that's got any budget. There are basic things you'll probably want to provision for (equipment, stock, edit time); but how much you need of each of these, and then what you need above and beyond the basics depends HUGELY upon the exact specifics of the documentary you're making.

However, I'm a documentary researcher for an independent production company based here in the UK - I've worked on a range of documentary and factual programming, ranging from really low budget productions to ones that cost millions of pounds; so I have a fair idea of how budgets work on all levels. I'm happy to discuss the specifics of your project via PM (or if you'd prefer, PM me your email address and we can talk that way).

Cheers,
Arktic.
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 1:43pm

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videofxuniverse

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All i can think of is getting the proper filming equipment. Try to get the clip on mics, this way you dont have a big hand held microphone dominating the picture. Boom mics make you look professional i guess (even if they aren't recording anything)
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 1:58pm

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SketchWork

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For documentary shooting I always find having a pre-record buffer a really useful thing.

I always have a 10 second pre-record buffer for docs because if I catch something I think would have been cool I know it has already been recorded in the buffer.

This wouldn't really help for stage recording, but helps a lot with fly on the wall back stage stuff.
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 2:52pm

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pdrg

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Don't buy a thing, just rent. $50k isn't enough to buy much good stuff, and frankly you'll need to spend that on travel, hotels, food, fees, etc., anyway.

If you have just $50k, first break out the essentials (delivery format - do you need to deliver digi-beta and rent a deck? Laying to tape NTSC safe, bars, tone, clocks, etc). Now editing fees/costs. Now production fees. Now DoP, puller, Sound Recordist, tape stock, camera hire, lamp hire, mic hire, travel to the locations, rooms for your crew on the road, location fees, insurances, legal fees, releases, participant fees, consumables, etc. Any left over? Buy yourself an ice cream wink
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 3:42pm

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Bryan M Block

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pdrg wrote:

Don't buy a thing, just rent. $50k isn't enough to buy much good stuff, and frankly you'll need to spend that on travel, hotels, food, fees, etc., anyway.

If you have just $50k, first break out the essentials (delivery format - do you need to deliver digi-beta and rent a deck? Laying to tape NTSC safe, bars, tone, clocks, etc). Now editing fees/costs. Now production fees. Now DoP, puller, Sound Recordist, tape stock, camera hire, lamp hire, mic hire, travel to the locations, rooms for your crew on the road, location fees, insurances, legal fees, releases, participant fees, consumables, etc. Any left over? Buy yourself an ice cream wink
Good advice.

My only other response might be that if you are truly doing a "run and gun" type of production, it may make better sense to go ahead and purchase two matching prosumer cameras (HVX200's or Canon XHA1's etc...) than to continue to rent if your production is going to last for more than a couple of weeks- your footage will look great and you can set the cameras up to match. They will pay for themselves in two weeks time and you can sell them on Ebay after the production is over wink (Let's not take 'ol Bry to task on his accounting practices again, shall we?) But after that, I'd say make sure you have good crew, especially for AUDIO- you can rent them and their gear- and a good PRODUCTION COORDINATOR/MANAGER. PLANNING & SCHEDULINGis going to be very, very important If you are doing interviews in a "set" environment and not run and gun, you may want to consider renting a light kit only when you need it.
But like pdrg said, you have to know what the specs are for the final program, what are your deliverables? Are you posting at home in Final Cut/AVID/Premiere Pro/Vegas or do you need to pay for post production time? What kind of master do you need to deliver?
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 8:06pm

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JornLavoll

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and a sound guy who will get along with the concert sound guy so that he can leech a mix of the frot of house mixer?
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 8:22pm

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Dancamfx

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Thanks the help guys. We looked into renting equipment but since this doc will take close to a year to film (We're filming various concerts, interviews, and more) we will be paying almost as much as the camera would be if we bought it.

We already have one Canon XH-A1 so getting another one seems to be a good idea to most of you.

As of crew, my friend and I will be filming and editing it, we use FCP and have had over 5 years exp in these fields. We have a graphic designer who will be doing all our lower thirds, titles, logos, and an text needed.
We also have an audio engineer on the project, but most of his equipment is used by recording artists and not interviews.

-So would lapel mics be better then Shotgun/boom mics for the interviews?

- What are some good lights for doing interviews.

Thanks,
Dan
Posted: Thu, 7th Feb 2008, 9:32pm

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pdrg

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-So would lapel mics be better then Shotgun/boom mics for the interviews?
>>Yep, you're likely to be in noisy locations so lavs are good. Nope, you're likely to be in busy, snatched moments, so booms would be better. Horses for courses!

- What are some good lights for doing interviews
>>A set of 3 redehads and a couple of lastolite-style reflectors will do everything you need. Get some 1/4 blue gels/ 1/4 ND, you can cover pretty much any situation.

Also think about buying a few yards of velvet, which you can staple to a cane/etc in a crunkled-up manner to give you a good, interesting (if side-lit) backdrop for those times when you just have a dull wall and need some class.

Sounds like you've got a lot of fun ahead, but if it's over a year, don't underestimate the costs of life on the road - be very clear upfront about what you pay for, what they pay for, and how many dates you're expected to be touring! For instance, will you have access to a dressing room for your kit, peace, taping/whatever? Will you get meal tickets for the green room/catering? Or have to choose between eating crappy hotdogs or paying out for decent food? The worst green room catering is 'baked potato with chips' day in day out. Yep, I've seen it.
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 1:38am

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Dancamfx

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pdrg,

You seem to know what you're talking about. I'll probably be contacting you and Arktic as things develop. But I do have another question for you, if we are to have a one on one sit down interview in a quite room what kind of mic should be used?

Thanks again to everyone who left a response, your posts really help.

-Dan
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 1:53am

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BlueSmudge

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Get a quality real fluid head tripod.
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 2:49am

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Serpent

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I'd also rent a nice jib for some of the shows. $50,000 won't buy you much, really, if you're on the road for a year. Equipment-wise, try to see how much everything will cost for you, and then use part of your leftover to buy the other camera(s), mics, tripod, and renting other equipment.

Interviews and performances are where you want the production value to be the best, really. So renting specifically for that would be ideal. Then behind the stage stuff can still be well-shot, but you don't necessarily need elaborate setups.

I obviously have a lot less experience than some here, but just throwing some ideas around.
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 11:23am

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pdrg

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Quiet rooms, 1+1 interviews, you can use either type of mic quite happily. There may well be a slight quality advantage with lapel mics, but if you've got a limited budget, you may just get one excellent boom mic instead of 1 ok boom and 2 ok lapels. At your price range, look to wired lapel mics, wireles adds cost, and you'll have drummers get up and wonder off still wearing them...

How are you framing the interviews? 1+1 (chat-show style multicamera), single mid-shot + interviewer pickups (ENG-style single camera with reverses), talking head (interview questions edited out for natural feel)? 1+1 certainly use lapels/lavs, very formal setting. ENG and talking head, can go either way, just keep the boom just out of shot and pointing at the interviewee.

If the interviews are all at one or two sittings, how about hiring a sound recordist to make sure the job gets done right? They can often bring their own pro equipment, which means you'll have good crisp audio.
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 1:33pm

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JornLavoll

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I am doing sound on two documentaries now this spring, and in a quiet 1 on 1 interview, my personal preference is to then put away the shotgun mic and the lavs, and instead use a "studio" mic.

i am probably bringing with me (in addition to the shotguns and a lav set) an akg c414, a pair of røde nt5's or neumann k184s, a sontronics sc2 and a røde nt4.

and this field mixer: http://www.sounddevices.com/products/442master.htm
and a portable edirol recorder. tiny and excellent setup smile everything fits in a little bag that i can carry with me everywhere.
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 2:42pm

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Hugo3

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Well, if you will be filming live performance I'd recommend to rent a steadycam and maybe even a crane to make it look as spectacular as it can.
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 3:25pm

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Bryan M Block

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Don't forget that life on the road gets lonely, and hookers aren't cheap...




oink
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 7:31pm

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Dancamfx

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So it looks like lapel mics might be the better way to go, according to you guys.

JornLavoll,

So the way you are doing your interviews, will the microphones be in the shot? If the interviewees are to be recorded without Lapel,boom, or shotgun mics does that mean they will be holding a mic?
Posted: Fri, 8th Feb 2008, 7:52pm

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Arktic

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No, if it's a sit down interview, get a mic stand/mount. You can position it so that the mic is held above the contributor, pointing downwards at them, or have it lower to the ground, pointing upwards at the interviewee - obviously have this out of shot.

Also, if you do opt for lavalieres - don't use lapel mics, as such. They look ugly - by seeing a visible microphone clipped to the contributor, it brings you out of the action and makes it seem less real - you might not think that's a problem with documentary, but it is; if the audience notice things like microphones, it reduces the sense that they're really there and witnessing the events, and it seems more set-up, which is not what you want. Always use a personal mic that you can use with a 'vampire'/'dracula' clip, and get a set of Rycote Undercovers - that way you can hide the microphone in practically all situations.

But, as I said before, it'd be helpful to know more specifics about the project before I can give you any detailed advice.

Cheers,
Arktic.
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 8:08am

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Dancamfx

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Arktic,

Thanks for the advice. I never liked using lapel mics for that same reason, plus they just bug me. smile

What kind of specifics do you need? At this time we are still in the middle of signing waivers and contracts so I cant say much, once were done I can give you every detail. But for now, what would you like to know?
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 12:14pm

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Arktic

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Ok, here's a list from off the top of my head - but the more detail you can provide, the better advice I'll be able to give you:

  • What's the overall runtime of the finished delivery?

  • What does that break down into - 50% interview, 50% gig footage?

  • When you say you'll be filming over the course of a year, does that mean you'll be working on this project and nothing else, or are you doing this in your spare time?

  • How many shoot dates do you have planned?

  • How many interviewees have you planned for? Will you be paying them a fee?

  • Do you plan to do all sit-down interviews, or will you be doing more fly-on-the-wall filming where you follow the interviewees around?

  • How much travel will be involved? Are all the gigs/interviews in the same country as you? If not, what arrangements have you made for travel?

  • If you're filming away from your base/home, what accommodation will you be arranging?

  • Will your interviewees need catering? Will your crew need catering? What are you providing for this - a catering service, or are you giving them per diems? How much are you planning to give them?

  • Does the 50k include your fee? With your fee, are you charging a flat fee for writing/directing, or are you invoicing on a per-hour/ per-day/ per-week/ per-month rate? Is there anyone else on the production team who might be charging a flat rate fee?

  • Are you expecting to have professional crew for all or any of the filming? If so, how many crew members are you looking to hire, and for how long?

  • Do you expect to hire any specialist equipment - jimmy jibs, steadycams etc? Are you planning to dry-hire these items, or will you be hiring the op too? If it's dry-hire, do you need to do any training courses before you start shooting?

  • Do you need to license any archive materials? Will it be moving footage or stills? How much have you provisioned for this?

  • How do you need to deliver the final master? Will you need to provision for hire of an edit suite for laying to tape?

  • Will this tape need to pass tech-review? If it does, is that at your end, or the clients? (This is very important if you're filming music performances - it'll probably need a Harding FPA certificate before you can show it publicly).

  • What about grading/finishing? Do you plan to do that yourselves, or are you going to be using high-end finishing hardware?

  • How much footage do you expect to film over the whole year? How much have you provisioned for tape stock? Are you going to be hiring an on-location shot logger, or will someone be in charge of logging rushes once you've got the footage back to base?

  • Will you be filming in public locations? If you are - have you got public liability insurance? If you're filming in private locations, how much will they cost?

  • Will your crew be insured against accidents during filming?

  • Do you have insurance to cover against delays in production, or errors and omissions in the final programme? If you fail to deliver to the client on time, who foots the bill?

  • Who's going to be paying if/when you go over budget?

  • Do you or your crew require any specialist training before you begin - health and safety training etc?

  • Who's the qualified first aider on location? If you don't have one yet, are you going to take a course for yourself or one of your crew, or are you going to hire someone on set to be a dedicated medical response?

  • Will you need to license any contributors (i.e. under 18 years old)?

  • How much do you have set aside for music (synchronisation) rights?

  • Who's in charge of paying fees to the ASCAP / BMI / Harry Fox? Is it whoever you're delivering to, or is it you? Do you have a license?

  • If you're filming a performance, who's in charge of paying them their union fees - AF of M for your musicians, AFTRA for your vocalists.

  • What other paperwork will you need to deliver? A PasC form? Music reporting? Who's going to be doing this? Are you hiring a production co-ordinator / production secretary to deal with this?

  • Who's in charge of the production account? Are you hiring an accountant, or do you want to deal with tax etc yourself? What about a production lawyer? Who's making sure the contracts are legal and above board?

That's about all I can think of at the moment - but it's by no means an exhaustive list. You might think that seems a lot, but these are all costs and implications that have to be considered!

Any other details you can provide, such as the brief / proposal (even the one-sheet) will be helpful - but obviously I understand if you've got an NDA in place (though personally I think you should sort everything important, like the budget, out BEFORE you agree to ANYTHING). Once you get the green light though, if you give me the details, I'll try to advise you as best as possible smile

Hope this helps!

Cheers,
Arktic.
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 4:21pm

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pdrg

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Yep, it is worth having insurance, good insurance. Life on the road is hard on equipment, every rig/de-rig is a chance for things to get lost or broken, so be smart and pack everything well, count it out of the boxes and back in, and insure yourself well.
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 8:27pm

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Dancamfx

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Arktic,

Here are the answers to your questions. I hope this helps you understand the situation better.

What's the overall runtime of the finished delivery?
Dont know at this time

What does that break down into - 50% interview, 50% gig footage?
Im pretty sure its going to be around 65% gig and 35% interview

When you say you'll be filming over the course of a year, does that mean you'll be working on this project and nothing else, or are you doing this in your spare time?
Well the gigs are pretty spaced out, for example the next one scheduled is march 29th. Once the interviews are done will be filming a gig probably once or twice a month.

How many shoot dates do you have planned?
So far 2 that I know of. Sometimes we hear of some gigs a week in advanced.

How many interviewees have you planned for? Will you be paying them a fee?
We have 5 as of right now, and no they are all doing it for free.

Do you plan to do all sit-down interviews, or will you be doing more fly-on-the-wall filming where you follow the interviewees around?
a little of both but Im not worried to much about the "Fly-on-the-wall" interviews.

How much travel will be involved? Are all the gigs/interviews in the same country as you? If not, what arrangements have you made for travel?
From what I know We will not be leaving the country

If you're filming away from your base/home, what accommodation will you be arranging?
Dont know as of yet

Will your interviewees need catering? Will your crew need catering? What are you providing for this - a catering service, or are you giving them per diems? How much are you planning to give them?
Are crew is small 3-4, and we're all doing this to get our names out there so we're not worrying about it as of yet.

Does the 50k include your fee? With your fee, are you charging a flat fee for writing/directing, or are you invoicing on a per-hour/ per-day/ per-week/ per-month rate? Is there anyone else on the production team who might be charging a flat rate fee?
Well we're mainly doing this to get our names out there but yes we will be taking a share for our fee as we will be taking time off of work to complete this doc. We have a graphics designer and a sound engineer who we will be paying.

Are you expecting to have professional crew for all or any of the filming? If so, how many crew members are you looking to hire, and for how long?
No, we'll be doing all the work ourselves.

Do you expect to hire any specialist equipment - jimmy jibs, steadycams etc? Are you planning to dry-hire these items, or will you be hiring the op too? If it's dry-hire, do you need to do any training courses before you start shooting?
We'll I have a Jib and a steady cam so we've got that covered

Do you need to license any archive materials? Will it be moving footage or stills? How much have you provisioned for this?
N/A at this time

How do you need to deliver the final master? Will you need to provision for hire of an edit suite for laying to tape?
We'll be handing the final product over to be DVD Authored and distributed

Will this tape need to pass tech-review? If it does, is that at your end, or the clients? (This is very important if you're filming music performances - it'll probably need a Harding FPA certificate before you can show it publicly). Not sure what this means, maybe you can explain it a little better for me

What about grading/finishing? Do you plan to do that yourselves, or are you going to be using high-end finishing hardware? We will be doing that ourselves, most likley using Vlab

How much footage do you expect to film over the whole year? How much have you provisioned for tape stock? Are you going to be hiring an on-location shot logger, or will someone be in charge of logging rushes once you've got the footage back to base? We will be doing all of this

Will you be filming in public locations? If you are - have you got public liability insurance? If you're filming in private locations, how much will they cost? We will be filming in both, not sure about insurance though

Will your crew be insured against accidents during filming?
N/A as of right now

Do you have insurance to cover against delays in production, or errors and omissions in the final programme? If you fail to deliver to the client on time, who foots the bill?
Deadline is no problem

Who's going to be paying if/when you go over budget?
We're going to set some money aside so hopefully that wont be a problem

Do you or your crew require any specialist training before you begin - health and safety training etc?
No, not at all

Who's the qualified first aider on location? If you don't have one yet, are you going to take a course for yourself or one of your crew, or are you going to hire someone on set to be a dedicated medical response?
Well my friend is a certified EMT so I think we're covered

Will you need to license any contributors (i.e. under 18 years old)?
Are you asking are we under 18?, if so we're all legally adults.

How much do you have set aside for music (synchronisation) rights?
Music is no problem

Who's in charge of paying fees to the ASCAP / BMI / Harry Fox? Is it whoever you're delivering to, or is it you? Do you have a license?

N/A at this time

If you're filming a performance, who's in charge of paying them their union fees - AF of M for your musicians, AFTRA for your vocalists.
The performers are fine with us filming

What other paperwork will you need to deliver? A PasC form? Music reporting? Who's going to be doing this? Are you hiring a production co-ordinator / production secretary to deal with this?
Not sure, this is the stuff my friend is in charge of

Who's in charge of the production account? Are you hiring an accountant, or do you want to deal with tax etc yourself? What about a production lawyer? Who's making sure the contracts are legal and above board?
Good question, im going to run this by my friend.
[/code]
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 9:22pm

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pdrg

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Dancamfx wrote:


What's the overall runtime of the finished delivery?
Dont know at this time

When you say you'll be filming over the course of a year, does that mean you'll be working on this project and nothing else, or are you doing this in your spare time?
Well the gigs are pretty spaced out, for example the next one scheduled is march 29th. Once the interviews are done will be filming a gig probably once or twice a month.

How many shoot dates do you have planned?
So far 2 that I know of. Sometimes we hear of some gigs a week in advanced.

How much travel will be involved? Are all the gigs/interviews in the same country as you? If not, what arrangements have you made for travel?
From what I know We will not be leaving the country

If you're filming away from your base/home, what accommodation will you be arranging?
Dont know as of yet

Does the 50k include your fee? With your fee, are you charging a flat fee for writing/directing, or are you invoicing on a per-hour/ per-day/ per-week/ per-month rate? Is there anyone else on the production team who might be charging a flat rate fee?
Well we're mainly doing this to get our names out there but yes we will be taking a share for our fee as we will be taking time off of work to complete this doc. We have a graphics designer and a sound engineer who we will be paying.

How do you need to deliver the final master? Will you need to provision for hire of an edit suite for laying to tape?
We'll be handing the final product over to be DVD Authored and distributed

Will this tape need to pass tech-review? If it does, is that at your end, or the clients? (This is very important if you're filming music performances - it'll probably need a Harding FPA certificate before you can show it publicly). Not sure what this means, maybe you can explain it a little better for me

How much footage do you expect to film over the whole year? How much have you provisioned for tape stock? Are you going to be hiring an on-location shot logger, or will someone be in charge of logging rushes once you've got the footage back to base? We will be doing all of this

Will you be filming in public locations? If you are - have you got public liability insurance? If you're filming in private locations, how much will they cost? We will be filming in both, not sure about insurance though

Who's going to be paying if/when you go over budget?
We're going to set some money aside so hopefully that wont be a problem
Dancamfx - I'm slightly worried you've not scoped this out fully yet - I'm concerned you'll end up working for free/maybe losing money on this. It is essential you should agree the scope before you go any further down this road, mate, or you'll hit 'scope creep' which will kill you. Agree the length and content of the deliverable, agree a payment schedule, agree now who pays for your travel, accommodation, food, insurance, etc. If you're delivering DVD's (including distribution?!), how many? Or an ISO master? Menuing system? A decent sound recordist will charge you a few hundres $ a day (worth it though), so make sure you cost out the number of gigs you're expected to attend, his independent travel, his hotelling, etc, and make sure you don't overcommit!!

It sounds like an exciting job, and it'll be great for getting 'out there', just make sure part of your plan is to take a professional approach, which means budgeting and planning etc upfront. Have a great time, just don't lose money on it!

EDIT - the only reason I flag the above points is because I sometimes work with one of the owners of Serpent Productions (who do lots of live music DVD's - Take That, Dave Gilmour, heaps of others), and I know these points would be big flags to them.
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 9:40pm

Post 28 of 31

Arktic

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I agree with pdrg - from the answers you've given, in reply to your initial question, 'what should we spend the money on', my answer would be NOT to spend any money yet.

You really need to make sure some of those key points are covered, otherwise you might end up loosing out. 50,000 is not a great deal of money in terms of production, but it is a lot for you to lose if you don't go about the right way.

But, once you've agreed key issues (mostly to do with the scope of the production, and who's paying for essentials like insurance), then you can afford to think about the budget.

Cheers,
Arktic.
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 11:42pm

Post 29 of 31

Dancamfx

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I understand both of your points but I must bring up the point once again that my friend is running the show on this one, not me. Thats why I dont know all the details. How He got involved in this is still a mystery to me, he has some connections.

The reason Im asking what should we spend the money on is because Im used to making films not docs. Also I dont know much about lighting (as I mentioned in my first post) so some recommendations would be nice.

I must admit it isnt very organized as of now, ive told my fiend this and well we've just started so Im not worried.

Some of the questions I had to avoid as of now, and I'll be happy to answer them soon. But other than that thanks for the advice.
Posted: Sat, 9th Feb 2008, 11:55pm

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pdrg

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Dancamfx wrote:


Also I dont know much about lighting (as I mentioned in my first post) so some recommendations would be nice.

I must admit it isnt very organized as of now, ive told my fiend this and well we've just started so Im not worried.
Cool - as long as you're bearing these things in mind as you budget and work through all t is, you'll be in a stronger position smile

As for lighting, I answered in one of the above posts - set of redheads and a couple of lasties and a couple of sheets of gel will do you just fine.
Posted: Sun, 10th Feb 2008, 8:43am

Post 31 of 31

Dancamfx

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pdrg wrote:

Dancamfx wrote:


Also I dont know much about lighting (as I mentioned in my first post) so some recommendations would be nice.

I must admit it isnt very organized as of now, ive told my fiend this and well we've just started so Im not worried.
Cool - as long as you're bearing these things in mind as you budget and work through all t is, you'll be in a stronger position smile

As for lighting, I answered in one of the above posts - set of redheads and a couple of lasties and a couple of sheets of gel will do you just fine.
Hey, thats why I started this thread. Its not everyday someone gives you an oportunity like this and when Im not too familiar with something relating to film I turn to the FxHome forums.[/i]