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Model Exploding

Posted: Sat, 8th Mar 2008, 12:12am

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The Editing Room

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i gonna make a test clip in holland of a house or something exploding

in model form but how would i make it look reel?
Posted: Sat, 8th Mar 2008, 12:18am

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SilverDragon7

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The Editing Room wrote:

i gonna make a test clip in holland of a house or something exploding

in model form but how would i make it look reel?
Well since you phrased it 'i gonna make a test clip of something exploding' it sound like you already know what to do.
Posted: Sat, 8th Mar 2008, 10:29am

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The Editing Room

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well i kinda do know what im doing but dont know how to do it
Posted: Sat, 8th Mar 2008, 4:38pm

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SketchWork

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In all honesty - what will make this look and feel real is a whole lot of hard work and man hours.

To make it look real you need to not only model the house as a whole, but model it in many pieces that come together to make the house.

The more individual detail models you use the beter it will seem ie. roof tiles, windows, frames, doors, etc. Then using your physics engine in 3D software when your house comes apart it will explode into pieces.

You also need to weight the individual parts for example walls and bricks weigh more than a roof tile, etc.

The more detail you include the better the effect will be.

Good luck.
Posted: Sat, 8th Mar 2008, 10:41pm

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The Editing Room

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thanks but im not doing it in 3d
Posted: Sat, 8th Mar 2008, 10:47pm

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exPLODEsion

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You could save a bit of time too by making a particle emiter emit random shapes. like a bunch of ruble flying around. I tried this in 1 of my videos and it worked really well. also a bunch of muzzle flashes will work at windows to look like the exPLODEsion is coming from inside the house if that's what your trying to do.

This can work really good for old buildings because the shapes don't have to be specific.

hope it helps cool If it does I would really like to get an avatar so I need some FXperience. razz
Posted: Sun, 9th Mar 2008, 11:07am

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Axeman

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The basic principles to blowing up a miniature are essentially these: Build it as detailed as possible. If you can, replicate an existing building you can actually film in front of, because if you can file the real thing, at actual size, then cut to the explosion of the miniature, it will be much easier to 'sell' the effect of a full-size building exploding. Then, to add scale to the explosion, you have to slow down the footage. Traditionally, they over-crank the camera while filming the miniature, meaning they record at perhaps 100 fps rather than the standard 24 fps, so when it is played back at 24 fps it seems much bigger than it actually is. There are actually set ratios of speed increase based on the scale of the model. This is much more difficult when working with digital video, as virtually all cameras have the framerate locked in. This terrific tutorial by Tarn can help, as it offers a technique to double your framerate, enabling you to slow the footage down much more without it getting choppy.

Building the model at the largest scale you can helps both with the detail work and the realism of the finished shot.