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Is there a Muzzle flash LIGHTING tutorial?

Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 12:55am

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Rook3

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If you look at the Effects lab abilities it says under "Pro" that you
can do muzzle flash lighting effects. I assume from the demo video this
allows you to do things like brighten a wall or ceiling (or actor's
faces) when "weapons" are fired.

Are there tutorials that explain how to do this with Effects Lab Pro?

Thanks in advance!
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 2:07am

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FXhomer46784

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Video Tutorials: http://fxhome.com/support/video-tutorials
EffectsLab demo: http://fxhome.com/effectslab/pro/demo-downloads
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 2:31am

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Rook3

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Thanks for the pointers. I was looking however for more specific
information about the Muzzle flash Lighting effects. I've already watched most of the the tutorials on how to do basic muzzle flashes.

Thanks!
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 3:14am

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Garrison

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If you mean the light reflecting etc. off walls and stuff then you would have to duplicate your footage.

The bottom layer should have it's brightness/gamma turned up and then on the top later, you cut out feathered masks on the ceilings and walls to reveal the bottom layer's brightness to get the effect.

That is one of a few work arounds.
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 3:23am

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Rook3

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Yes, that's what I meant. Thanks! That sounds...
really time consuming. smile

I wonder if that's how they did it for the demo muzzle flash video.

I imagine it would be more required for indoor footage than outdoor footage.
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 5:26am

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Axeman

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Its best to create the lighting practically while on set filming, as it is very difficult to get the lighting to interact properly with the environment in post. Almost invariably, well done digital effects are indeed very time consuming.

In some cases, you can just add a mask to the muzzle flash itself, to limit the area affected by the glow. In other cases, you have to get more involved and creative, using techniques such as the one mentioned by Garrison.
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 5:31am

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pixelboy

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Actually, I believe you could do the same thing using a Grade Object, rather than duplicating your footage. Still going to be pretty time-consuming, though As far as tutorials, this one by Oeyvind about creating artificial lighting for lightsabers might be somewhat helpful to you: http://fxhome.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=23035
The use of on-set lighting can be really effective as well, of course, and could save you a lot of time biggrin
Posted: Tue, 13th May 2008, 1:36pm

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Rook3

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Good idea. Creating the lighting on set is impossible however as I'll be using previously shot footage. sad

After re-watching the video tutorial about how they did the "smoke monster" for the "Get Lost" short, I imagine you could use a... I forget what it's called... Gradiant mask(?) to create a bright spot, instead of a shadow on the ground like they did for the smoke monster.

Just making the background real bright and mask the area of effect to keep it within a certain area, such as the front of the actor's faces and clothing?