You are viewing an archive of the old fxhome.com forums. The community has since moved to hitfilm.com.

For us Americans :)

Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 3:12am

Post 1 of 56

Rockfilmers

Force: 2182 | Joined: 10th May 2007 | Posts: 1376

VisionLab User PhotoKey 4 User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

This is a cool quiz that says what form of american english you speak. I'm 50% dixie, 50% yankee. Now that I think about it, I wonder if are freinds across the pond (That means you guys in the UK) would be dixie or yankee. biggrin

http://www.angelfire.com/ak2/intelligencerreport/yankee_dixie_quiz.html
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 3:18am

Post 2 of 56

Jabooza

Force: 2743 | Joined: 21st Jul 2006 | Posts: 1446

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

I got 50% Yankee.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 3:50am

Post 3 of 56

Thrawn

Force: 1995 | Joined: 11th Aug 2006 | Posts: 1962

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

52% (Dixie). Barely into the Dixie category...
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 3:54am

Post 4 of 56

Bryce007

Force: 1910 | Joined: 5th Apr 2003 | Posts: 2609

VideoWrap User Windows User

Gold Member

49% yankee
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 3:58am

Post 5 of 56

FreshMentos

Force: 1667 | Joined: 10th Jun 2006 | Posts: 1141

VisionLab User MacOS User

Gold Member

38% Yankee. I didn't realize that California's slang was so similar to the Great Lakes region.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 4:05am

Post 6 of 56

Biblmac

Force: 852 | Joined: 12th Jun 2007 | Posts: 1513

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User

Gold Member

37% Yankee and proud of it!!! biggrin
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 4:42am

Post 7 of 56

Thrawn

Force: 1995 | Joined: 11th Aug 2006 | Posts: 1962

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

I don't understand why I'm a dixie... I live in NorCal for goodness sake...
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 5:56am

Post 8 of 56

B3N

Force: 3081 | Joined: 26th Feb 2006 | Posts: 1534

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

"67% (Dixie). A definitive Southern score!"

Wow, Although I'm British this says I'm more of a southern person...in which case I'm gonna' start talkin' like a texan, boy! Yeehar!
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 6:38am

Post 9 of 56

Atom

Force: 4300 | Joined: 9th May 2004 | Posts: 7014

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Sadly only 71% dixie. sad

I also didn't realize that calling all carbonated beverages 'coke' wasn't even a regional thing, but was largely just a Texas thing.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 7:44am

Post 10 of 56

Frosty G

Force: 540 | Joined: 28th May 2005 | Posts: 640

EffectsLab Pro User Windows User

Gold Member

50% Yankee.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 9:37am

Post 11 of 56

pdrg

Force: 5405 | Joined: 4th Dec 2006 | Posts: 4143

VisionLab User Windows User

Gold Member

Well, as a purebred Englishman I thought I'd give it a try and crashed at the first question -

The 'au' in Aunt rhymes with 'car', none of the available answers (and the same goes for a few of the others, for instance we don't sell our rubbish on the lawn, we have car boot sales where everyone drives their rubbish to a field but buyers know it's regular so you get loads in one place) - boy do you 'merkins speak funnily smile
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 10:20am

Post 12 of 56

Bryce007

Force: 1910 | Joined: 5th Apr 2003 | Posts: 2609

VideoWrap User Windows User

Gold Member

PDRG.... Are you aware of what a "Merkin" actually is?



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merkin
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 12:33pm

Post 13 of 56

Bolbi

Force: 408 | Joined: 22nd Apr 2006 | Posts: 429

EffectsLab Pro User MacOS User

Gold Member

Im from the Midwest and im proud to call my coke bottles coke! sleep
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 2:54pm

Post 14 of 56

Jabooza

Force: 2743 | Joined: 21st Jul 2006 | Posts: 1446

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Heh, to me it doesn't make any sense to call any type of soda coke unless it actually is Coca-Cola. smile I just call them all soda.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 2:56pm

Post 15 of 56

SilverDragon7

Force: 2265 | Joined: 29th Jun 2006 | Posts: 1990

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

45% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 4:26pm

Post 16 of 56

RodyPolis

Force: 805 | Joined: 28th Apr 2007 | Posts: 1839

CompositeLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

76% (Dixie). That is a pretty strong Southern score!
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 4:31pm

Post 17 of 56

Poseidon1231

Force: 510 | Joined: 1st Jan 2007 | Posts: 322

EffectsLab Pro User

Gold Member

45% Yankee
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 4:55pm

Post 18 of 56

Thrawn

Force: 1995 | Joined: 11th Aug 2006 | Posts: 1962

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Jabooza wrote:

Heh, to me it doesn't make any sense to call any type of soda coke unless it actually is Coca-Cola. smile I just call them all soda.
Totally agree... Pretty ridiculous. I visited south dakota a few months back and they called soda "pop" which really through me off. They kept asking me if I wanted some pop and bars to go. Which is their way of saying soda and cookies.. weird that we all live in the same country and yet refer to a lot of things in a totally different way.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 7:02pm

Post 19 of 56

Fill

Force: 1257 | Joined: 1st Jul 2005 | Posts: 1652

CompositeLab Lite User EffectsLab Lite User Windows User

Gold Member

Thrawn wrote:

I visited south dakota a few months back and they called soda "pop" which really through me off. They kept asking me if I wanted some pop and bars to go. Which is their way of saying soda and cookies.. weird that we all live in the same country and yet refer to a lot of things in a totally different way.
Ah! That's funny because I visited New York and I had the same experience backwards. A waiter asked what I wanted to drink and I responded, "What pops do you have?" and he gave me the weirdest look. Oh, and they kept saying "sneakers" instead of gym shoes.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 7:15pm

Post 20 of 56

Klausky

Force: 1512 | Joined: 16th Jun 2005 | Posts: 392

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Lite User VideoWrap User Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

44% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 7:41pm

Post 21 of 56

pixelboy

Force: 3000 | Joined: 13th Feb 2005 | Posts: 439

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

60% (Dixie). Barely into the Dixie category.
People here call soft drinks "pop." One occasionally hears "soda" used, but just "coke"? That's none too specific, is it? wink
Also, never heard the phrase "pop and bars" myself. Cookies are called cookies, in my experience.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 10:48pm

Post 22 of 56

Limey

Force: 547 | Joined: 11th Sep 2005 | Posts: 752

Gold Member

44% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 11:19pm

Post 23 of 56

Dancamfx

Force: 2558 | Joined: 7th Sep 2006 | Posts: 873

VisionLab User FXpreset Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

44% Yankee
Posted: Tue, 20th May 2008, 11:23pm

Post 24 of 56

Penguin

Force: 852 | Joined: 17th May 2006 | Posts: 560

EffectsLab Pro User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

51% Dixie, even though I live in Maine. Hmm...
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 12:23am

Post 25 of 56

Jabooza

Force: 2743 | Joined: 21st Jul 2006 | Posts: 1446

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Darth Penguin wrote:

51% Dixie, even though I live in Maine. Hmm...
Well, I got 50%, which is obviously right in the middle, so maybe that means I don't have an accent and talk completely normal. smile And you talk almost as normal as I do. wink
Although, it is weird that you didn't get 49%.


-Jabooza
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 12:25am

Post 26 of 56

Plainly

Force: 1537 | Joined: 27th Dec 2006 | Posts: 767

VisionLab User FXpreset Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Well, as a purebred Frenchman I thought I'd give it a try and crashed at every single question there was -

I pronounce 'you all' 'everyone', 'throwing toilet paper over a house', 'impolite' and that water-supplier in public buildings a 'fontaine d'eau'.

50% Yankee. I guess they were utterly torn on my account. wink
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 12:31am

Post 27 of 56

Jabooza

Force: 2743 | Joined: 21st Jul 2006 | Posts: 1446

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

pdrg wrote:

The 'au' in Aunt rhymes with 'car',
What about the 'R' in 'car'? wink It's always been beyond me why the 'R' would silent. smile



-Jabooza
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 12:51am

Post 28 of 56

ben3308

Force: 5210 | Joined: 24th May 2004 | Posts: 6433

VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

I think my uses of "y'all" and "coke" give me away as a Southerner, though people used to always think I was from NY due to my pronunciation of most other words. You can watch me on camera in my YouTube stuff and I doubt you'd think I was from Texas.

I call cokes 'soda' when I'm speaking to someone I don't know (so as not to throw them off) but generally around friends and family I use the term 'coke' for pretty much anything. It's non-specific in that 'coke' is the flavor and 'a coke' is any carbonated beverage.

'Pop', however, always seemed like a laughable term to me. I honestly had to hold back laughter, even in kindergarten, when I was still really young, when my old gym teacher said 'you can buy some candy or some pop'.

As for 'sneakers', I use the term to apply to anything that's moderately sporty, like Converse or Skechers. I use running shoes to apply to running shoes, like Asics or Brooks, and 'tennis shoes' to apply to anything that's not leather topsiders/loafers or dress shoes.

Finally, with 'aunt' I pronounce it differently depending upon who I'm near. If it's other white people, 'ant'. If it's my friends of other races, it's 'ahnt'. I've found when I use to former with a lot of my black friends they look at me weird. So I started switching dialects some years back. smile

I got 67% dixie, though I'm proud of the reasons for it. Remind me to shoot myself if I ever call coke/soda 'pop'. wink
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 1:12am

Post 29 of 56

Rockfilmers

Force: 2182 | Joined: 10th May 2007 | Posts: 1376

VisionLab User PhotoKey 4 User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

I think my uses of "y'all" and "coke" give me away as a Southerner
The funny thing is that I grew up in North Carolina and Florida and I barly speak like a southerner. It was funny though, me and some freinds went to Newport Beach, California and everyone told us how strong our acents were and I couldn't even tell a difference between us and them. I agree with most people, I only call coke, coke. evry thing else is soda and I call fountain drinks soft drinks (Never saw how they could be soft though unsure).
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 2:11am

Post 30 of 56

DigiSm89

Force: 815 | Joined: 2nd Jun 2002 | Posts: 1898

Windows User

Member

45% (Yankee). Barely into the Yankee category.
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 5:24pm

Post 31 of 56

pdrg

Force: 5405 | Joined: 4th Dec 2006 | Posts: 4143

VisionLab User Windows User

Gold Member

Bryce007 wrote:

PDRG.... Are you aware of what a "Merkin" actually is?
Absolutely. But I used to work for Microsoft and so, with our international colleagues, we'd chat about nationalities, and many would say...

"I'm a Merkin"

wink
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 5:59pm

Post 32 of 56

Bryce007

Force: 1910 | Joined: 5th Apr 2003 | Posts: 2609

VideoWrap User Windows User

Gold Member

I grew up in Montana, and people there call "Creek" "Crick", when that's clearly not the proper pronunciation of it. It drives me nuts for some odd reason.

I personally think THICK Southern/country accents sound both low class and uneducated. A light Texan drawl is acceptable, but I simply can't help but make rather debasing assumptions about someone's intelligence level when I hear people from Alabama or Georgia speak.
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 6:03pm

Post 33 of 56

Atom

Force: 4300 | Joined: 9th May 2004 | Posts: 7014

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Oh, I must so heavily disagree. Oftentimes, probably largely by coincidence, the most eloquent people I hear have thick southern accents.

Moreso than the York British accent (right?) a proper southern accent has- to me- the mark of the most refinement and class. And no, I am not kidding. Watch any movie with upper-class southerners in it, or the Ladykillers with Tom Hanks.
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 6:11pm

Post 34 of 56

Bryce007

Force: 1910 | Joined: 5th Apr 2003 | Posts: 2609

VideoWrap User Windows User

Gold Member

I think you're referring to the RP British accent Atom. Yorkshire accents definitely don't sound classy.
Posted: Wed, 21st May 2008, 6:14pm

Post 35 of 56

Atom

Force: 4300 | Joined: 9th May 2004 | Posts: 7014

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Ah, you're correct. Thick Southern accents are still more refined in my mind.
Posted: Thu, 22nd May 2008, 4:03am

Post 36 of 56

MillerBros

Force: 1366 | Joined: 21st Oct 2007 | Posts: 69

VisionLab User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

60% (Dixie). Go Texas!
Posted: Thu, 22nd May 2008, 1:50pm

Post 37 of 56

Rockfilmers

Force: 2182 | Joined: 10th May 2007 | Posts: 1376

VisionLab User PhotoKey 4 User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

I personally think THICK Southern/country accents sound both low class and uneducated. A light Texan drawl is acceptable, but I simply can't help but make rather debasing assumptions about someone's intelligence level when I hear people from Alabama or Georgia speak.
Talk about stereo-typs! My cus thomas in North Carolina has a very strong southern accent (If he did this test, he would be 75-85% dixie) and he has passed all his advanced classes and is now at some gib collage but I forgot which one. Just because you talk one way doesn't make you smart or stupid. if you grew up in alabama and youl ived in a small comunity were people say ya'll and stuff, you too would talk like one of dem southernres smile
Posted: Thu, 22nd May 2008, 2:42pm

Post 38 of 56

Penguin

Force: 852 | Joined: 17th May 2006 | Posts: 560

EffectsLab Pro User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Rockfilmers wrote:

I personally think THICK Southern/country accents sound both low class and uneducated. A light Texan drawl is acceptable, but I simply can't help but make rather debasing assumptions about someone's intelligence level when I hear people from Alabama or Georgia speak.
Talk about stereo-typs! My cus thomas in North Carolina has a very strong southern accent (If he did this test, he would be 75-85% dixie) and he has passed all his advanced classes and is now at some gib collage but I forgot which one. Just because you talk one way doesn't make you smart or stupid. if you grew up in alabama and youl ived in a small comunity were people say ya'll and stuff, you too would talk like one of dem southernres smile
He didn't mean he actually thinks that they're stupid... he means that he can't help but thinking that they sound stupid.
Posted: Thu, 22nd May 2008, 2:56pm

Post 39 of 56

SilverDragon7

Force: 2265 | Joined: 29th Jun 2006 | Posts: 1990

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Darth Penguin wrote:

He didn't mean he actually thinks that they're stupid... he means that he can't help but thinking that they sound stupid.
Not eloquent is how he put it wink.
Posted: Sat, 24th May 2008, 12:07pm

Post 40 of 56

Six

Force: 0 | Joined: 9th Apr 2008 | Posts: 2

Member

Newbie's first post here and as a born'n'bred Englishman I just had to take this test to see if I could possibly be misconstrued as having any kind of 'American-English' accent at all.

Anyway... I scored 57% dixie.

To contradict pdrg who stated that 'aunt' is pronounced like 'car', in other words... 'arnt'. I feel compelled to point out that this is specifically a southern English pronunciation, and as a northerner I say 'ant'

The front lawn sale... I agree with pdrg, we have car-boot sales so none of the options apply to us.

Gym shoes... they're 'trainers' over here so I couldn't answer that one.

Interstate highway/parallel roads or whatever... Huh? No answer to give there either.

Water in a public building comes from a tap just like it does in your house... yet another one that I couldn't answer...LOL

You Americans throw toilet paper over houses? Wierd!

Bugs that roll into balls? Now I'm really puzzled.

Interesting test though, we also have many different accents, perhaps we should create a test to see which type of English-English you Americans speak...LOL
Posted: Sat, 24th May 2008, 3:22pm

Post 41 of 56

Serpent

Force: 5426 | Joined: 26th Dec 2003 | Posts: 6515

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Cultural differences are amusing. smile

Six wrote:

Water in a public building comes from a tap just like it does in your house... yet another one that I couldn't answer...LOL
We also call sinks taps, or tap water (more often just use sink). The question referred to a drinking fountain, still called a tap in the UK?

You Americans throw toilet paper over houses? Wierd!
smile Weird indeed. It's a prank-like thing that teens do. It's easy to do and hard to clean, especially if it rains.

Bugs that roll into balls? Now I'm really puzzled.
They're disgusting:



Welcome to the forum!
Posted: Sat, 24th May 2008, 8:09pm

Post 42 of 56

Six

Force: 0 | Joined: 9th Apr 2008 | Posts: 2

Member

Serpent wrote:

The question referred to a drinking fountain, still called a tap in the UK?


Welcome to the forum!
The drinking fountain seems to be an American thing, not something you see over here.

Thanks for the welcome.
Posted: Sat, 24th May 2008, 8:21pm

Post 43 of 56

Evman

Force: 4382 | Joined: 25th Jan 2004 | Posts: 3609

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

I'm 50-50 both ways it seems.
Posted: Sat, 24th May 2008, 9:25pm

Post 44 of 56

Pooky

Force: 4834 | Joined: 8th Jul 2003 | Posts: 5913

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

I'm French Canadian but 57% Dixie... interesting.
Posted: Sun, 25th May 2008, 4:46am

Post 45 of 56

Plainly

Force: 1537 | Joined: 27th Dec 2006 | Posts: 767

VisionLab User FXpreset Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Pooky wrote:

I'm French Canadian but 57% Dixie... interesting.
Lies are interesting as well.

wink
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 12:09am

Post 46 of 56

DVStudio

Force: 4983 | Joined: 22nd Nov 2007 | Posts: 1845

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User PhotoKey 4 User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

50% yankee too.
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 3:17am

Post 47 of 56

Aculag

Force: 8365 | Joined: 21st Jun 2002 | Posts: 8581

EffectsLab Lite User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

62% Dixie. No idea what this means, but I also think it's totally ridiculous to use "coke" to refer to ANY carbonated beverage... Coke is a brand name, and I have no idea at all how it came to be used so generally...
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 4:12am

Post 48 of 56

JasonX1024

Force: 1390 | Joined: 13th Jan 2008 | Posts: 492

VisionLab User Windows User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

100% YANKEE BABY!!!!
my GREAT Grandparents immigrated straight to New York and never left but ive heard of strings of my family who moved to the west
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 6:30am

Post 49 of 56

Atom

Force: 4300 | Joined: 9th May 2004 | Posts: 7014

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Aculag wrote:

62% Dixie. No idea what this means, but I also think it's totally ridiculous to use "coke" to refer to ANY carbonated beverage... Coke is a brand name, and I have no idea at all how it came to be used so generally...
The same way some people say 'Kleenex' for "tissue" or 'Frisbee' for "flying discus". All are brand names that are so wildfire they became commonplace.
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 7:31am

Post 50 of 56

Evman

Force: 4382 | Joined: 25th Jan 2004 | Posts: 3609

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Atom wrote:

Aculag wrote:

62% Dixie. No idea what this means, but I also think it's totally ridiculous to use "coke" to refer to ANY carbonated beverage... Coke is a brand name, and I have no idea at all how it came to be used so generally...
The same way some people say 'Kleenex' for "tissue" or 'Frisbee' for "flying discus". All are brand names that are so wildfire they became commonplace.
Don't forget the most common one in my mind, "Band-Aid" for "bandage".
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 7:45am

Post 51 of 56

Aculag

Force: 8365 | Joined: 21st Jun 2002 | Posts: 8581

EffectsLab Lite User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

Right, or Xerox for a photocopy, etc. That is true, Atom, but Coke is VERY specific. It refers to a specific brand of cola, not anything else. If I was offered a Kleenex, and it turned out to be just a generic store brand tissue, I wouldn't think twice, but if someone offered me a "coke" and came back holding a can of 7-Up, I'd probably slap that person on the face.

It's reasonable for people to use "Kleenex" and "Frisbee" as a descriptor for a tissue or a "flying discus", because I mean.... What other brands of tissue and flying disc are so commonplace? But using "coke" as a general descriptor for ANY soda is like using "ford" instead of "car".

I've only actually met one person who's used "coke" to mean "soda", and he was also from Texas... Definitely a Texas thing, I guess. wink Anyway, this is a totally pointless rant, and I'm not trying to stop anyone from saying it, I just think it's weird. I guess that's the 38% Yankee in me talking. smile
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 7:52am

Post 52 of 56

Atom

Force: 4300 | Joined: 9th May 2004 | Posts: 7014

EffectsLab Lite User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Hey, I'll throw it right back at you: Is Coke not the absolutely most common cola on earth? Surely it is, even if Pepsi wants to deny it.
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 8:22pm

Post 53 of 56

Aculag

Force: 8365 | Joined: 21st Jun 2002 | Posts: 8581

EffectsLab Lite User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker MacOS User

Gold Member

It totally is, no question. But again, it's still a cola, and using it to describe such a wide spread of soft drinks doesn't really make much sense.

If you're at a restaurant and say "I'll take a coke", do they ask you "what kind?" or do they just bring you a Coke?

Atom, you know I love you, and I'm not seriously arguing against this oddity of language. Doing so would be fruitless, but damnit, we're having fun. wink
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 8:27pm

Post 54 of 56

Bryce007

Force: 1910 | Joined: 5th Apr 2003 | Posts: 2609

VideoWrap User Windows User

Gold Member

I was just talking about the "Coke" thing with my GF the other day. I made the exact point Aculag was making, and I then proceeded to win the argument.


Therefore, Atom loses.
Posted: Mon, 26th May 2008, 10:52pm

Post 55 of 56

Pooky

Force: 4834 | Joined: 8th Jul 2003 | Posts: 5913

EffectsLab Lite User Windows User MacOS User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

Calling all sodas "Coke" is like calling all fruits "Apple" or all movies "Star Wars". Basically.
Posted: Sat, 7th Jun 2008, 9:45pm

Post 56 of 56

MillerBros

Force: 1366 | Joined: 21st Oct 2007 | Posts: 69

VisionLab User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Since we live in Houston, our answers and terms were almost always used in Texas, Houston, or Southeast US. We always use words like "feeder", "subs", and "rolling" (or TPing).