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Lighting my green screen.

Posted: Sat, 31st May 2008, 5:53pm

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GunLeg3nd

Force: 400 | Joined: 28th Dec 2007 | Posts: 6

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Hello, I have been working with my green screen for quite awhile and know the best results come when the screen is lighted equally at a light shade of green. My problem is it is very dark. I have tried using construction lights but it also adds a shaddow. I have tried bouncing the light off objects and was wondering if my best bet would be to use photography lighting. If so can someone please tell me what's best or what my problem is.

~GunLeg3nd
Posted: Sat, 31st May 2008, 7:32pm

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Axeman

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A picture showing what you are working with currently would be of great help for us to be able to offer advice.

Always light your screen serapately from your actor. If the shadow you are referring to is being created by your actor, then the lights just need to be moved. Construction lights should work fine, as long as they are placed correctly. If you can afford proper photography lighting, then that will obviously be more suited to what you are doing, but its by no means necessary. One of the best greenscreen lighing set-ups you can use is to set up outside on an overcast day. The lighting is very even, and there is plenty of it to get good exposures.
Posted: Sat, 31st May 2008, 9:38pm

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Thrawn

Force: 1995 | Joined: 11th Aug 2006 | Posts: 1962

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In addition to what Axeman said, your lighting should be as soft as you can make it. Harsh lights make it harder to key, in my experience. Two ways you can soften your light is either making a makeshift soft box (my preference, PM me if you want details) or moving you light farther from the object your trying to light. Also, when lighting greenscreen, I have found it most useful to use the normal three point lighting (key, back light, fill) along with a background light, which is used to light the green screen itself, and brings depth to your key. So, you can achieve a great key with work lights, as long as you place them in the correct positions.

EDIT: I found an article that had illistrations of what I'm trying to explain.

Three point lighting plus background light (four point lighting)
Posted: Mon, 2nd Jun 2008, 5:42pm

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GunLeg3nd

Force: 400 | Joined: 28th Dec 2007 | Posts: 6

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http://img141.imageshack.us/my.php?image=picture012hc6.jpg

I have it up against my wall and I had that construction light mounted ontop of the metal bar. This is in my bacement and we have 8 windows and a glass door on other end so natural light gets in.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Jun 2008, 5:11am

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Axeman

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SuperUser

The screen looks very evenly lit in that picture, but the light doesn't appear to be on. I think I phrased my first request incorrectly. What would be helpful is to see a frame of the footage you are working with, the lit greenscreen with the actor in front of it. Then we'll be able to offer suggestions for getting an easier key.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Jun 2008, 1:43pm

Post 6 of 6

GunLeg3nd

Force: 400 | Joined: 28th Dec 2007 | Posts: 6

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Note: Last Night I bought constant video/picture lighting for my green screen. I think this will solve problem.