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America no longer the Fattest in the World

Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 3:28pm

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ben3308

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Yes, friends, it's true!

Despite common, common stereotypes of fat, stupid citizens of the United States (most of which are unqualified, but that's another conversation! biggrin) America has now fallen behind in the fat quotas, only to be surpassed by Australia, of all people.

More info on this here.

You all do not know how happy I am about this, hah. Finally one stereotype is defeated.

America 1 - Australia 0
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 3:29pm

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Atom

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Yes! Just proves that you don't need to make America healthier, just one more place even fatter!
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 3:31pm

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Simon K Jones

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This doesn't mean you're not fat anymore, it just means someone else is fatter. So not only are you still a nation of fatties, you can't even be the best at it anymore. wink
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 3:39pm

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Travis Kunze

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lol Tarn. thats funnny.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:02pm

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Atom

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Thanks for copying what I said, Tarn. wink
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:03pm

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Simon K Jones

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Don't make me get moderatey on your (not quite as fat as Australian) ass. razz
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:08pm

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Atom

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Eatin' too many dingos and crocodiles down under, I guess. wink
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:09pm

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Simon K Jones

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You'd think that running away from all the snakes and spiders would keep them relatively fit.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:23pm

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Atom

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They don't have to worry about those anymore. Not since Hugh Jackman protects them nowadays.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:27pm

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Fill

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Ah, well I have you all beaten. Many health magizines have named the city I live in the fattest city in the U.S. Even the government has included us in their 'most obese' survey right in the top five.

Now a few comments on this:
My friend moved to Australia, and he was pretty chubby, but now he's really fit. They've got some very nice looking women. Their food is less fatty, for example, my friend(I can't really say why he had them) got some imported Doritos from the States, and the amount of cheese they put on was a pile of snow compared to what they put on Aussie Doritos.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 4:34pm

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Atom

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They have to put less cheese on the Doritos because cheese attracts rabid kangaroos. Dur!
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 5:04pm

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FreshMentos

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Atom wrote:

They have to put less cheese on the Doritos because cheese attracts rabid kangaroos. Dur!
And deadly jellyfish!
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 5:20pm

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er-no

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Aye but to be fair when you get a really fat American, they are shockingly obese. I've never seen that with an Australian.

One women I saw once whilst driving through Flagstaff (AZ) found it a struggle to get into a Mcdonalds through its very large double doors.

sad
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 5:44pm

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Atom

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You get a really fat anyone, they're obese.

Oh, and I don't eat fast food. I don't really know anyone who does. Even late at night people don't really go to them. The McDonald's I've seen are largely empty most of the time, and the European idea that America runs on fast food- at least from my perspective where I live (which is, in fact, the center of one of America's largest and most-recognized cities)- is largely off-course.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 5:44pm

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Plainly

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http://www.forbes.com/2007/02/07/worlds-fattest-countries-forbeslife-cx_ls_0208worldfat_2.html

Seeing how (relatively) low they were last year, I've got to admit Australians must be rather fit to be able to climb up the ladder so quickly...
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 6:35pm

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Fill

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Atom wrote:

the European idea that America runs on fast food- at least from my perspective where I live (which is, in fact, the center of one of America's largest and most-recognized cities)- is largely off-course.
That's strange. All the McDonald's here are jam packed with cars, same with Burger King and almost every fast food restaurant. I went to Chicago last week, and it was the same. Everytime a mother asks where to eat, the kids always yell, "McDonald's!"

I don't eat fast food much, either. But if you think of it, America has three problems:
1. Our society has made gluttony look appealing, and meal sizes are gigantic. (Take Wendy's cup sizes for example. A large cup is 42oz(3.5 cans of pop))
2. Eating healthy is very expensive. Have you ever gone to a Fresh Market? It's ridiculous what it costs to eat food grown without any pesticides.
3. Maybe it's the women's rights movement, or maybe it's just bad parenting, but in my generation, there are not that many women that know how to cook. I'm totally serious. I've known so many girls that can't cook, and when they have a family, what will they eat? Something cheap and fast: McDonald's.

I've always had strong feelings on the health in America. I've actually threatened to move to Europe where the government actually cares what they eat. The FDA here is a complete joke.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 6:54pm

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jimmypop

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I think the majority of this was covered in Morgan Spurlock's "Supersize me". To be honest I've never seen a fat yank. wink
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:11pm

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Atom

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I'm lucky enough to have been blessed with a Southern-Comfort maternal side of a family with a health-conscientious knack also. So, like the stereotypical southern family, my nuclear family eats-in together most nights and Sundays a lot of our family eats-in together. My parents shop at health/organic places once or twice a month, but primarily it's just making good stuff out of cheaper/mainstream ingredients. But there's the problem with most people: they think if you eat healthy or organic, it's gotta be 24/7 and all come from the market produce shop. But mostly, it's in the home-cooking.

This isn't true for most women that are mothers though, and as sexist as it may sound it is very depressing to see. My mom and grandmother are such excellent cooks (or chefs, even) that it puzzles me to always see my friend's families either going out or ordering in and never actually making/cooking food at home.

I do think this is a large part of it, as I see the parks and gyms full 24/7. I think it's less about laziness and more about improper eating and over-consumption; although both are really somewhat to blame.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:14pm

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NuttyBanana

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I have a feeling Australia has accomplished this simply through beer gut, not American style eating biggrin
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:16pm

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Atom

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Hey, over-eating is more respectable and safer (to other people) than over-drinking. smile

Will it be liver cancer or heart disease for you today, sir?
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:18pm

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CX3

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Fill wrote:


3. Maybe it's the women's rights movement, or maybe it's just bad parenting, but in my generation, there are not that many women that know how to cook. I'm totally serious. I've known so many girls that can't cook, and when they have a family, what will they eat? Something cheap and fast: McDonald's.
You know men can cook as well? Heaven forbid your wife isn't in the kitchen with a meal ready for you and your family before you get home from work haha. No offense, because you prob didn't mean to word it like that (at least I hope not hah) but it's comments like these that empowers womens rights movments.

EDIT: Besides, your only 17! haha, your generation hasn't even grown yet hah.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:21pm

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Atom

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CX3 wrote:

You know men can cook as well? Heaven forbid your wife isn't in the kitchen with a meal ready for you and your family before you get home from work haha
You know it's probably this assumption, that men just want their meals ready immediately when they get home and don't care to help (an equally-sexist and offensive assumption); that is keeping both sexes from being able to cook.

And no, I don't think Fill's comment was worded strongly. I'm not even joking when I say there's a great Cosby episode that tackles both sides of this pretty well. I saw it a few nights ago at like 4am and was surprised how neutral the whole thing was.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:26pm

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CX3

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Atom wrote:

CX3 wrote:

You know men can cook as well? Heaven forbid your wife isn't in the kitchen with a meal ready for you and your family before you get home from work haha
You know it's probably this assumption, that men just want their meals ready immediately when they get home and don't care to help; that is keeping both sexes from being able to cook.

And no, I don't think Fill's comment was worded strongly.
Haha, who are all these people that you know who don't cook? I find this funny because you all are either still in highschool or just now leaving. You'll be surprised just how much the cooking factor comes into play around the later college years or when you're out in the real world. I wouldn't expect a bunch of high schoolers (male or female) to be wiz's behind the stove already haha. With time, everyone picks up different knowledge behind cooking but rarely does it start so early.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:34pm

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Atom

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CX3 wrote:

Haha, who are all these people that you know who don't cook? I find this funny because you all are either still in highschool or just now leaving. You'll be surprised just how much the cooking factor comes into play around the later college years or when you're out in the real world. I wouldn't expect a bunch of high schoolers (male or female) to be wiz's behind the stove already haha. With time, everyone picks up different knowledge behind cooking but rarely does it start so early.
Well, I'm lucky enough to know how to cook but I know, very well actually, several college and high schools students who don't know how to (let alone do it well). I think you're giving too much credit to 'our' generation, CX3. Which is sad of me to say, but it's true.

Even when people do know how to cook, our generation's parents and our generation itself have an over-reliance on eating-out and ordering-in, one that was nowhere near as prominent even 10-15 years ago.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 7:45pm

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Thrawn

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Atom wrote:

You get a really fat anyone, they're obese.

Oh, and I don't eat fast food. I don't really know anyone who does. Even late at night people don't really go to them. The McDonald's I've seen are largely empty most of the time, and the European idea that America runs on fast food- at least from my perspective where I live (which is, in fact, the center of one of America's largest and most-recognized cities)- is largely off-course.
It's the same where I live. Fast food, though handy when you don't have time to cook, isn't as popular as some might assume. I only eat at fast food restaurants maybe once a month, and that's only at In-N-Out. Heh, if you ask me, I'd say that Starbucks is the only real drive through that people go to around here.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 8:58pm

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Coureur de Bois

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I'm more interested in knowing who the most obese member of the Fxhome community is.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 9:21pm

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ben3308

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Atom.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 10:03pm

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Atom

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Buuurrrrnnnnnn!!!
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 10:25pm

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Bryce007

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I definitely agree with Adams. The fact that it's considered "Optional" to be able to cook food for yourself is pretty ridiculous past the age of about 14.

I mean, really, aren't basic survival skills something that should be considered important?


I can tell you this much about some of the fatass obese kids around the world right now: If they were forced to spend the time to cook the food they ate, they wouldn't be eating as often or as much.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 10:39pm

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Mellifluous

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ben3308 wrote:

Yes, friends, it's true!

Despite common, common stereotypes of fat, stupid citizens of the United States (most of which are unqualified, but that's another conversation! biggrin) America has now fallen behind in the fat quotas, only to be surpassed by Australia, of all people.

More info on this here.

You all do not know how happy I am about this, hah. Finally one stereotype is defeated.

America 1 - Australia 0
The stupid stereotype hasn't been discounted, though. Or has Australia lost to America on that one too?

- offending Americans and Australians since 1894

Edit:

I read some interesting things about human nutrition in general in my Anthropology degree.

Yes, obesity is caused by too much of a fast food, snacking diet. But also, it can be determined from birth (you may have heard about this).

Basically, if a mother has a poor/inadequate diet, the unborn infant develops in a way to combat this. E.g. if the mother's physiology is telling the development process there is not enough food, then the infant will develop reacting to this by becoming very good at storing fat, as a child and as an adult.

Obesity is then more likely in such a child, because the fatty diet they have in real life is in excess of what they've developed to/physiological expectations = more storage of fat = obesity.

Linked to this is type 2 diabetes, which is common among immigrants to a country, basically because their sugar intake exceeds what their physiology has come to expect. Many countries have had little sugar intake for thousands of years and so people moving to another country and diet have problems.

On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is low in westernised peoples because we've been consuming sugar for 500 years.

Last edited Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 11:04pm; edited 2 times in total.

Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 10:53pm

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ben3308

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You're right, we invented the car, the plane, motion pictures, lightbulbs, electricity, and the computer. What's more, Texans invented and still produce the electronic wafers, semiconductors and DSPs which function in 97% of the world's computers and phones. How stupid we must be. biggrin

Honestly, like 40% of the greatest inventions of the world are American-made. I'll give Gutenberg the number one spot on a list of 100, but Americans take a lot of those top spots as well. It's not we got to be the largest economic, sociocultural, and military power in the world by not having some upper hand in our intellect.

But that's beside the point. smile

EDIT: We also have racism in America, but compared to Australia it's nothing. I was talking to an Australian kid the other day and his sentiments are basically to treat all Asians and aboriginal people like dirt. Surprisingly, Australians in the FXHome chat have shared the same feelings. So maybe Americans are just less-informed so as to make them kinder? I dunno... biggrin

Last edited Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 10:58pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 10:58pm

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Bryce007

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Nikola Tesla. Supermodels. Austria FTW.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 11:00pm

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ben3308

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Come to Texas, my friend. I can guarantee you that as far as population percentages go, the hot:mediocre:ugly ratio is sleighted much more on the positive side than anywhere else in the world.

Well, save Brazil. But they've got a boatload of other issues in and of themselves. (kidding)
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 11:02pm

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Bryce007

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ben3308 wrote:


Well, save Brazil. But they've got a boatload of other issues in and of themselves. (kidding)
Heh. No, but really, they have boatloads of problems.
Posted: Thu, 19th Jun 2008, 11:08pm

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ben3308

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I really think it's all pretty much explained in this film.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 1:36am

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aenigma

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Titled "Australia's Future Fat Bomb," the study compiled the results of height and weight checks carried out on 14,000 adult Australians in 2005.
So They tested Australians 3 years ago and now they declare themselves fatter. Maybe next time you should actually test people in the country you are going to compare yourself to.

I say US still fattest until I see conclusive evidence.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:03am

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Rawree

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ben3308 wrote:

You're right, we invented the car, the plane, motion pictures, lightbulbs, electricity, and the computer.
If you ignore the fact that they were invented by a German, a Frenchman, another Frenchman, a Brit, nobody really invented electricity and the British respectively then yes, that's right.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:06am

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ben3308

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Henry Ford, the Wright Brothers (and by extension Howard Hughes), Edison, and several Americans.

I'm not saying other countries didn't simultaneously come up with the same technologies (Karl Benz, for example, who made the first internal combustion engine but failed to apply it to any kind of modern car before Ford was producing and distributing his. Lumiere made a motion picture camera that functioned, but it was Edison who developed the type of properly-functioning models that cinema features saw.). Just that, generally speaking, Americans pioneered (and are therefore credited with) the basis for the modern, mass-produced automobile, airplane, monofilament lightbulb and microprocessor.

But I don't want to look like the arrogant American, so I'll stop this particular string of argument. After all, what I'm saying will probably be thrown off for being taught as a biased history in American schools; or something similar. I just hate the insidious argument of most Europeans that Americans are stupid. While it's true we have a lot of dumb people (jgtrox2 a prime example) that shouldn't obscure the fact that we also have a lot of very intelligent people. Like I said: there's a reason we're the (in terms of economy and power) most successful country in the world.

Last edited Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:15am; edited 3 times in total.

Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:09am

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jgtrox2

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my mommie says im speacial
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:10am

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ben3308

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I say you're a dumbass.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:14am

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Rawree

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Karl Benz, Clément Ader, Louis Le Prince, Warren de la Rue. Albeit the second one is a bit dodgy but still my point stands. Surely the pioneers are the first to explore these technologies and not the ones to "perfect" them (ie the Americans you mentioned). I'm clearly just splitting hairs for the sake of it here.

Ah you edited whilst I was writing. I'm not saying Americans are stupid, just encouraging you to be more specific with your points. It's one thing to say that the first mass-produced automobile for the consumer market was invented by Henry Ford but quite another to say that he invented the car. I for example have plans for a mallet made of cheese and yet wouldn't claim to have invented the hammer. Anyhoo, you've managed to dismantle your original post quite nicely without me needing to elaborate further in this daft pissing contest. God bless America!

I kid of course.

Last edited Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:22am; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:20am

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ben3308

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I edited my post, I hadn't realized that I'd already posted after it. Check that for substantiation of my claims.

I don't disagree with you- Benz invented the internal combustion engine. But Ford simultaneously invented it, applied it to a four-wheeled vehicle, and sold it to the modern American, which is basically the process by which we buy and operate vehicles today.

Lumiere pioneered moving film, but his devices were crude and insufficient in comparison to Edison's Kinetascope and its children.

Essentially, whenever, in the history of these objects, two people made them simultaneously, it was the American out of them who took the concept from birth to completion on a marketable scale. Ford invented an engine, created a car around it, and sold that car before anyone else. Edison ran a motion picture company while Lumiere did nothing of the sort. Maybe I'm stressing the capitalism of it all, eh? biggrin
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:20am

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Atom

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Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel, Jessica Simpson. All made in America.

I rest my case.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:35am

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Rawree

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Atom wrote:

Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel, Jessica Simpson. All made in America.

I rest my case.
But so were...Hitler, Mussolini and...Lex Luthor unless I'm descending into the realms of delusional fantasy resulting from the high levels of Jessica Alba....
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:52am

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D3L3T10N

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Rawree wrote:

Atom wrote:

Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel, Jessica Simpson. All made in America.

I rest my case.
But so were...Hitler, Mussolini and...Lex Luthor unless I'm descending into the realms of delusional fantasy resulting from the high levels of Jessica Alba....
Hitler and Mussolini were made in America?
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 2:52am

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Atom

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Hahaha. +1 for that bit of joyous humor.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 3:22am

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coldside

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Wow. Not sure if any Australians have posted here, nor do i know how many other Aussies are on fxhome, but geeze. I'm not fat lol.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 3:28am

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Bryce007

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I was always under the impression that everyone in Australia looks like Crocodile Dundee and wrestles Crocs' to stay in shape.




Jessia Alba.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 3:36am

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Kid

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Henry ford wasn't the inventor of the car you fool! He wasn't even the first american to make a car! What he is famous for is the assembly line. And he didn't actually invent that either, he was just one of the main forerunners of putting it into use.

Americans are famous for inventing pretty much nothing. What they tend to do is finance scientists from everywhere else though. (using funds from resources that they stole from Native Americans btw smile )

Last edited Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 3:39am; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 3:39am

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Bryce007

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Kid, I apologize on behalf on the American school system.

(And I use the term "System" here very loosely)
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 4:00am

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NickF

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coldside wrote:

Wow. Not sure if any Australians have posted here, nor do i know how many other Aussies are on fxhome, but geeze. I'm not fat lol.
I'm not fat either. I'm friends with Asians. There aren't many aboriginals around here but I wouldn't be racist towards them either.

Silly American...
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 5:47am

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ben3308

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Probably the attribution theory at work here- and for that I deeply apologize- but every Aussie I've met (both on FXHome and the few handful down here at college) has shown large resentment towards the Asian community. I think it was based off of the spread of disease or something, but even then such racism is despicable. The reason I even bring it up is because from the people I've talked to, it's a common thing- almost like a 1950's United States view of diversity- that isn't even seen as wrong.

Again, I am just speculating and this is off of my own experience. I'm sorry for attributing it to Australia as a whole.



As for the fat thing:

You may not be fat, but that doesn't mean the general populus of your country isn't. Welcome to the worldview of America: if a handful of people are fat and stupid, all Americans must be fat and stupid.

The primary reason I posted this up (I got the facts from Drudge Report and Digg, where the comments on the article were largely anti-American) was because I wanted to parallel how ignorant of a thing it is to call everyone of one country something negative so as to stigmatize them.

I of course mean you Aussies no harm, 'twas not my intention.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 7:37am

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Sollthar

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It's not we got to be the largest economic, sociocultural, and military power in the world by not having some upper hand in our intellect.
Hehe, this is such an utterly shortsighted and biased line it's amusing in itself. Surely the fact it's one of the largest countries with the most citizens has nothing to do with it. I assume it's really just the fact that peole from that side of the world MUST have a more effective intellect because... maybe the suns shines different there. smile


In all the time I visited the US, I did notice or at least got the subjective impression there's more fat people then here. Just like I did notice that in the UK, women seem to have abnormally high cup sizes.

Having said that, the best thing about the US is indeed the huge things you can buy there. I bought I gallon of Gatorade... A gallon. Hehehehe. That was awesome.

The american McDonalds however I'd give very low marks. It's a hobby of mine to compare McDonalds all over the world (because despite their claim to taste the same anywhere, that's entirely not true) and the US version is pretty bad just followed by the german one.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 8:38am

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Garrison

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Man it's great to be lean.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 8:52am

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CX3

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Sollthar wrote:

Just like I did notice that in the UK, women seem to have abnormally high cup sizes.
And you're just now sharing this information with me? I gotta do some laundry.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 9:06am

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ben3308

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Sollthar wrote:

Hehe, this is such an utterly shortsighted and biased line it's amusing in itself. Surely the fact it's one of the largest countries with the most citizens has nothing to do with it.
The operative word in my statement being 'some'. Even before America was large and in charge population-wise, we had power in our infrastructure. Different cultures are better at different things, and that 'American work ethic and intellect' is AT LEAST PARTLY what has led us to where we are now. I realize this asserts a certain superiority congruous with arrogance, and for that I'm sorry: that's not what I'm getting at. biggrin

But it is important we all notice that we have varying societies that are good intrinsically at different things for different reasons. But this is all, of course, aside the point.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 9:21am

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Sollthar

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So, fun stereotypes aside, you seriously argue - as a valid logic deduction - that a US citizen has a higher intelligence then a citizen of another country (I'm assuming this goes by passport, yes? Or do you have to be born over there in order to get the higher brain activity treatment)?

I'm honestly very interested in this. Because as I understood, that's what you said. With or without the word "some" thrown in.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 9:21am

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CX3

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ben3308 wrote:

I realize this asserts a certain superiority congruous with arrogance, and for that I'm sorry: that's not what I'm getting at. biggrin
Yet, you are there haha. Sometimes ya gotta know when and when not to say certain things. Reading that comment makes me feel like a douchebag and I didn't even do anything hah.

**Hands Ben a shovel

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Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 9:22am

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Kid

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America was the same size when it was first found! Its economy is almost entirely based on the abundant natural resources. Do you want a medal for the fact that America got where it is today simply by not noobing it up?

Also people-wise america is made up of settlers from other countries around the world that brought their technology with them. So surely it did so well because of the intelligence of those countries!
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 9:59am

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Simon K Jones

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Atom wrote:

Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel, Jessica Simpson. All made in America.

I rest my case.
Yep, that is pretty definitive proof of the stupidity stereotype, I'll agree with you there.

wink
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 11:50am

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vilhelm nielsen

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Good for you... Now go read a BOOK!

wink
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 12:39pm

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D3L3T10N

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Kid wrote:

Also people-wise america is made up of settlers from other countries around the world that brought their technology with them. So surely it did so well because of the intelligence of those countries!
Someone check me on this, but I'm pretty sure that what country you come from has little to nothing to do with your intelligence.
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 12:41pm

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Kid

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D3L3T10N wrote:

Kid wrote:

Also people-wise america is made up of settlers from other countries around the world that brought their technology with them. So surely it did so well because of the intelligence of those countries!
Someone check me on this, but I'm pretty sure that what country you come from has little to nothing to do with your intelligence.
That is kind of what we are saying!
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 4:32pm

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Bryan M Block

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ben3308 wrote:

Sollthar wrote:

Hehe, this is such an utterly shortsighted and biased line it's amusing in itself. Surely the fact it's one of the largest countries with the most citizens has nothing to do with it.
The operative word in my statement being 'some'. Even before America was large and in charge population-wise, we had power in our infrastructure. Different cultures are better at different things, and that 'American work ethic and intellect' is AT LEAST PARTLY what has led us to where we are now. I realize this asserts a certain superiority congruous with arrogance, and for that I'm sorry: that's not what I'm getting at. biggrin

But it is important we all notice that we have varying societies that are good intrinsically at different things for different reasons. But this is all, of course, aside the point.
Part of that "work ethic" was that America was a "frontier based" society until the middle of the 20th century really- I mean the rural electrification act didn't occur until the 1930's and the US is still mostly rural. THat combined with the fact that we never had a long legacy of class and nobility built into our cultural fabric provided the opportunity for individual work ethic to create class mobility, at least,quite possibly, to the greatest extent that had been previously known- however, American's focus on work and "the practical concerns" of life has had what I consider to be a negative influence on our collective culture. Most Americans are terribly unaware of what is going on in the rest of the world, we are one of the most illiterate countries in the developed world regarding science, geography, history, and many other complex subjects. I don't mean we can't READ, I mean we are functionally illiterate regarding those subjects and lack comprehension. We have a wasteful consumerism-based culture that has blossomed in the post-WWII prosperity of the U.S. and it is reflected in everything from the "Super-Size" fast food menus to the 72oz. "Big Gulp" sodas to the huge Hummer SUV's on our highways. We've rejected any "higher" cultural ambitions, and that is why our PhD programs are packed with people from other countires, particularly Asians who belong to cultures that value education for more than it's practical application, but as an aspiration unto itself.

I regularly am appalled by the sheer number of people I see that are not just a little overweight as most of us get to be as we age, but are really quite FAT. I saw this FAT kid the other day in my brother's neighborhood using a RIDING lawnmower to cut his small suburban lawn!! It would take 20 minutes with a regular mower- or better yet a push mower that doesn't pollute or use gas. But they had this blubber head using a riding mower, when he CLEARLY could use the exercise of doing this by hand. And that my friends, is what I see summing up the attitude of "Americans" as a group that continues to hold us back and make us FAT.
redface frown
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 7:30pm

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ben3308

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Sollthar wrote:

So, fun stereotypes aside, you seriously argue - as a valid logic deduction - that a US citizen has a higher intelligence then a citizen of another country
No, not at all. I'm simply saying that America isn't as largely stupid as people on this board often assume, and that that stereotype is in part defeated by the example of our success as a country. Not that we're smarter than everyone else- that'd be a ridiculous statement- but that we are, in fact, smart.

Again, I've heard leagues of people on here call Americans stupid. When I call them smart it's something to draw a condescending, baiting response to? I already said that I wasn't getting at the fact that America was 'better' than everyone else in the intellect department, just that we're relatively intellectual. That's why I included the statement of concession about there being a congruity of arrogance, which is, again, not what I wanted.

Aaaagghh. crazy
Posted: Fri, 20th Jun 2008, 8:58pm

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Thrawn

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Dangit, my daddy learned me american words just like the rest of ya'll, so don't be all callin' me dumb. wink
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 12:54am

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Coureur de Bois

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I'm an American inventor who is fat and stupid.

WHADAYA THINK OF THAT?!
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 4:36am

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D3L3T10N

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Kid wrote:


That is kind of what we are saying!
You guys confuse me. crazy
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 1:01pm

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Klut

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Is it true that Americans only have "world history" as an obligatory subject for only 1 year, but a lot of American history?

In Norway we have had world history, geography and "society-subject" from we are 8 to 16 years old. I get a feeling Americans doesn't now that much about the rest of the world, or that they don't care. Is that right? Quick, what's the capital of Ireland, Norway, Egypt and Estland? (joking razz)

Btw, norwegians invented the Cheese slicer. We are brilliant.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 1:23pm

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Tommy Gundersen

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Klut wrote:



Btw, norwegians invented the Cheese slicer. We are brilliant.
Couldn't agree more.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 1:30pm

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D3L3T10N

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Klut wrote:

Is it true that Americans only have "world history" as an obligatory subject for only 1 year, but a lot of American history?
In my district, we have the same amount of American history as World, in terms of required classes. After that you can take more World classes if you elect to, but no more American history classes are offered--unless you count government. But this differs from state to state as far as public schools go.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 3:26pm

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Frosty G

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Haha, I don't think I'm going to read all the pages of this post, but it seems to be a large anti-Americanpost. Don't see alot of those anymore sleep


Every country has their dumb fat people who only care about their own country. America is just bigger than some other nations so we have more of them. So I'm sure I can find US citizens smarter than alot of other foreign citizens and alot of foreigners who are loads smarter than alot of Americans. And I bet we each like our own country the best. So bygones be bygones.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 6:39pm

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drspin98

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I so agree with the "America is over-rated" (or worse) crowd on here. I mean just look at all the posts/reviews/dissemination of major films, they go on and on about the huge gobal hits coming out of the U.K., Sweden, Norway and Germany, etc-hardly a word about the clearly inferior American cinema and its contributions.

Last edited Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 6:58pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 6:46pm

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Klut

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I'm looking forward to my 1 month long trip to California with my brother this summer.
=D
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 7:35pm

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Sollthar

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I so agree with the "America is over-rated" (or worse) crowd on here. I mean just look at all the posts/reviews/dissemination of major films, they go on and on about the huge gobal hits coming out of the U.K., Sweden, Norway and Germany, etc-hardly a word about the clearly inferior American cinema and its contributions.
Was that a rather lame and entirely misplaced attempt at irony there drspin98? smile


Thanks for clearing it up Ben. I see what you meant now.

I don't subscribe to the idea "americans" are more stupid or less stupid then other people. Just like "swiss" wouldn't be more or less intellegent as obviously, intelligence has little to do with the place you're born or which passport you own.
The education you can get where you are and the financial possibilities your family or your country has however, that has a large impact and in that regard, the US are obviously playing in the big leagues amongst other countries.

I bet we each like our own country the best.
Nah, not really. Then again, I'm entirely unpatriotic and I don't believe in "countries" in the way others do. They're just random lines some people drew through a map at the end of the day. I like some ideas and aspects better then others. But most of them are scattered through very different countries.
To even try to name ONE country as "the best" is something I leave to the kind of discussions 10 year olds have when they argue about if "Batman" or "Superman" is cooler, personally.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 9:18pm

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Plainly

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Sollthar wrote:

To even try to name ONE country as "the best" is something I leave to the kind of discussions 10 year olds have when they argue about if "Batman" or "Superman" is cooler, personally.
Oh really? wink

Klut wrote:

get a feeling Americans doesn't now that much about the rest of the world
For me, I think the reason why I see the US as generally ignorant (or used to do so) would be because of game shows. (No, I'm not joking.) Since we're you guys' neighbours, I guess, there are some questions about Canada relatively frequently asked, and it seems that they are practically always answered wrongly. These stories spread through the country and we all think, 'Boy, are those Americans ignorant!' which is really just a bad case of generalisation. (Examples of ACTUAL questions asked: Canada touches which American border? [choices: North, south, east, west. The woman answered 'south'.] What is Canada's official summer sport? [The question itself, here, is immaterial: the point is that the woman (another woman, not the same one wink) thought that it was rugby, because you play that indoors, whilst it couldn't be something like lacross because you play that outdoors and it's always cold in Canada! Lacross was the right answer, mind you. There were 4 choices total.])

Anyway, my point is that what we're really doing is judging the whole country due to 2 of its citizens. What are you guys supposed to do? Kick them out so they make another country look stupid? And really, it's not like other countries don't have idiots, either. So - yes - I do feel awfully bad for Americans who have to go through this. Or something along those lines.

Plainly

Last edited Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 10:48pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 9:57pm

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drspin98

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"lame and entirely misplaced". Hmmmm Well the "lame" part of course, is entirely up to the beholder. I (though thoroughly unqualified to make an unbiased judgement on my own post) don't really think so, but like I said, because of various people's opinions, tastes, sense of humor, etc I accept that may be the case, but "misplaced"?!?

Let's see; this is a board populated by a very wide range of people as far as age, occupation, nationality,-the list could go on. But the ONE common characteristic we share (I may boldly venture) is more than a passing interest in films. The thread that we did (and am now) post in morphed into a (among other things) arena for certain folks to make known their less-than worshipping attitude towards the good ole USofA.

I choose to bring up a point that I believed every person reading this thread could relate to-film. The first rule of a good communication is to know one's audience. If this same thread began in a site for say, plumbers, I may bring up how Craftsman Stillson wrenches are really nicely made, or if this was a site for surgeons I may bring up the fact that many, many heads of state/wealthy/well-connected non-Americans regularly visit the U.S for medical treatment every year (certainly one cannot argue the opposite is true).

I chose to put it into a context everyone here could relate to. A point that transcends things like political leanings, race, age, even jingoism.

Say what you what about the USA, but recognizing it's complete domination (that word isn't even strong enough, but that's the best I can think of) of cinema is what some call a "no-brainer"-especially on a site like this.

"entirely misplaced"?-hardly.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 10:33pm

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D3L3T10N

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Plainly wrote:

Just don't elect a baboon next time. wink
I know a few baboons who find that very offensive.
Posted: Sat, 21st Jun 2008, 10:53pm

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Plainly

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D3L3T10N wrote:

I know a few baboons who find that very offensive.
Oops. redface But - really - what isn't 'offensive' these days? (And I really didn't mean that comment in a bad way, for the record. I mean - look - you could tell me the exact same thing I said and I'd simply agree with you. Without being all scandalised. Not saying you, D3L3T10N, are scandalised. It was a generalised 'you'. razz)
Posted: Sun, 22nd Jun 2008, 7:56am

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Sollthar

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The thread that we did (and am now) post in morphed into a (among other things) arena for certain folks to make known their less-than worshipping attitude towards the good ole USofA.
I have to say I can't find any post that says "the USA is terrible" in this thread - other then Mels obviously sarcastic one. Could you point me to it?

Otherwise, if a "less than worshipping attitude", meaning people have to worship the US, then obviously you'll get loads of people who don't.

Hence I thought it was misplaced.


Bringing up the fact most movies discussed on an english speaking board mostly populated by americans, or that reviews in english about commercially successful movies are about american movies (I don't suspect you read much german, french or indian film magazines for that matter, where the most movies are made) as a point to counterargument negativity towards the US and somehow be seen as a proof of it's superiority is - unfortunately, if anything - confirming the stereotype.

Because naturally, there's entirely no correlation between the worth of a country and how much it's movies are discussed, mostly by itself, or the fact the it has such a financial overweight towards other countries that it's movies get released and dominate in other countries as well.

Hence I thought it was lame.


No personal judgement of your character or person by the way, just of the argument you made or at least, how I understood it.

And obviously, as a side remark, I love the american cinema. wink
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 1:51am

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Frosty G

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Would it be snobby if I posted the lyrics to "I'm Proud To Be An American" now? wink
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 2:11am

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ben3308

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EDIT: Uh-oh, drspin's post is gone. Now mine might not make the most sense in context. neutral
____________________________________

To bring some perspective into here, what do I think of American cinema compared to that of other areas?

Well, I think in a lot of ways, it's superior. Clearly there's a larger industry (due to a larger country, etc) so even from that you're going to have a larger body politic of 'good' films simply because more films with more exposure are made.

'Foreign' films, as it were, are often too esoteric or culturally different for the American audience. Suffice it to say Americans aren't as 'cultured' as other countries, but because, unlike Europeans, we don't live as close to such a variety of nations (the UK' distance to Sweden is about the same as Texas to Florida) we find it harder to comprehend some of the humor and cinematic styles seen in other films. This isn't just language, but caveats of filmmaking that are noticeably different.

That being said, I enjoy foreign films a lot of the time. Though the majority go misunderstood (and maybe even a little overrated), ones like "Amelie", while a little overbearing in its 'unique style', are great. As was "District B13", and anything by the Aussie (haha, wouldn't you know it!) who did "Spider" and "Lucky". Also, if you've had time to check out my Movies of 2008 thread, my top two films are both by foreign directors.

On the whole I think American cinema has had more success, for whatever reasons you want to attribute it to (notwithstanding the fact that they're simply made by Americans biggrin) but this doesn't make the films of anywhere else inferior in any way. And though I don't subscribe to the fact that most of the American films are 'trash'(I saw Norbit and loved it for what it was) I can concede that we do produce more lower-quality films than most others.

/spiel
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 2:46am

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CX3

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ben3308 wrote:


Well, I think in a lot of ways, it's superior.

ben3308 wrote:

but this doesn't make the films of anywhere else inferior in any way.
Would this be a stalemate then? haha
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 2:47am

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ben3308

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Poor word choice on my part, my apologies. You could then say that we supersede the standards in many areas of filmmaking, but this doesn't mean that other places don't meet or even exceed the same standards. Just that we're good at different things.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 4:03am

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Atom

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In response to you Klut, my government-funded, 100% public education was comprised of different history subjects throughout educational marks. Hope this puts some of your nerves at ease:

In elementary school (age 6-12) it's primarily (if not entirely) World History & Geography. Age 6-9 is almost all geography. What is where. Maps. The usual stuff. Age 9-11 is a mix of state and national history, but everything else is world. In my schools, we were specified to countries for age 12. My country of study for the year was, believe it or not, Norway. wink

Middle school (age 12-14) is less history and primarily government. This, for me, was mostly Texas government (which is highly-complex in it's own right) and a little bit of national (U.S.) government.

Finally, high school (age 14-18 ) is more of a pick-and-choose system. In my four years, I took AP Human Geography (which covers the displacement of people and places across the world and the patterns of them- an advanced form of World Geography), then World History (which was entirely, entirely centralized to Asian and African history), then my third year I took AP U.S. History, which was primarily dealing with (sigh) the American Revolution and slavery.

My last year of high school, I took AP European History and it was by-far my favorite class of all my high school years. It was the most sought-after class in the building, taught by the best teacher who has also been there the longest. I loved it, and it was greatly-stressed too. So I hope that makes you feel a little better.

I also happened to take AP U.S. Government my senior year, but that doesn't go into the history or geography side of U.S. education by public school standards.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 8:48am

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Sollthar

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Ah, shame spins post is gone. Would have liked to read what he wrote.

What I really like about american cinema is the fact they HAVE blockbusters in order to let so many smaller, potentially even indie productions, swim on top of that.

Switzerlands film world for example, is the total opposite. We have a ton of artsy and indie films that might be absolutely excellent, but only a handful of people go see it. We don't have the "blockbuster" that earns the money, and those little films don't earn the money either, hence the money is only there because the state finances it. So a lot of films never get made, which is a shame. And those who get made lack the financial backup to get exported into other countries.

Which is a lot of the reason american cinema has so much success abroad. It's not that they're liked so much, it's mostly because the US market is larger then the rest of the worlds filmmarket and so the studios behind the films have the financial power to bring the films abroad.


I personally find different storytelling cultures very interesting. They reflect each country a lot. And some I can entirely not relate to, for example the japanese style or some of the german style, which only very few times produces films I really like ("the experiment" or "life of others", which are both 10/10 movies for me)


Anyways, back to the topic of why aussies are fat now...
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 2:53pm

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Bryan M Block

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Atom wrote:

In response to you Klut, my government-funded, 100% public education was comprised of different history subjects throughout educational marks. Hope this puts some of your nerves at ease:

In elementary school (age 6-12) it's primarily (if not entirely) World History & Geography. Age 6-9 is almost all geography. What is where. Maps. The usual stuff. Age 9-11 is a mix of state and national history, but everything else is world. In my schools, we were specified to countries for age 12. My country of study for the year was, believe it or not, Norway. wink

Middle school (age 12-14) is less history and primarily government. This, for me, was mostly Texas government (which is highly-complex in it's own right) and a little bit of national (U.S.) government.

Finally, high school (age 14-18 ) is more of a pick-and-choose system. In my four years, I took AP Human Geography (which covers the displacement of people and places across the world and the patterns of them- an advanced form of World Geography), then World History (which was entirely, entirely centralized to Asian and African history), then my third year I took AP U.S. History, which was primarily dealing with (sigh) the American Revolution and slavery.

My last year of high school, I took AP European History and it was by-far my favorite class of all my high school years. It was the most sought-after class in the building, taught by the best teacher who has also been there the longest. I loved it, and it was greatly-stressed too. So I hope that makes you feel a little better.

I also happened to take AP U.S. Government my senior year, but that doesn't go into the history or geography side of U.S. education by public school standards.
But doesn't the quality of this vary widely from district to district even in one state? It did when I was in school. I went to an inner-city school in the 'hood and even our "AP" classes were pretty much one year or MORE behind what the "standard classes" were in my girlfriends suburban high school, and many classes such as what you are mentioning weren't even available unless you went to an "alternative" high school. Our school was so busy trying to keep guns out of lockers, crack deals from going down, and the emerging gang scene from taking hold in our school rather than worry about "world history"... Ahhh- the 80's.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 4:08pm

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ben3308

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That's more a product of socioeconomic disparity than the actual education system, I'd say. I live(d) in probably one of the worst neighborhoods of most anyone on this website (speculation, of course) and my education came out just fine.

Of course things are going to vary, we just find it necessary to generalize and draw averages to speak about it as a whole.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 7:25pm

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Bryan M Block

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ben3308 wrote:

That's more a product of socioeconomic disparity than the actual education system, I'd say. I live(d) in probably one of the worst neighborhoods of most anyone on this website (speculation, of course) and my education came out just fine.

Of course things are going to vary, we just find it necessary to generalize and draw averages to speak about it as a whole.
But generalizations can be accurate pictures- you just have to understand that it is a "generalization" and as such it doesn't apply to every single individual when citing them wink The benchmark is really "How useful is the generalization?" - or else most behavioral and social sciences studies would be useless... and they aren't. They are designed to identify trends and causal factors, etc... I think you are right about it being socioeconomic- but to my understanding, when you are speaking about the "public education system" it is merely a sub-structure of the socioeconomic structure and they are entwined to the point where you cannot seperate them. Kentucky figured this out several years ago and changed how they funded their public schools- and performance went UP in the "poorer" schools and yet didn't decline in the more wealthy school districts- because there is a socioeconoic factor at work underneath the whole thing.

The other question becomes "What should the role of the public school actually be? How far can or should they go to provide that education, and how much of it is really up to the students / parents?" I would guess that despite your bad neighborhood ( I went to school in the 'hood too) that within your home your education has a certain value, that you parents are somewhat concerned with how you are doing with school,etc... and that certain expectaions for not failing a grade level and such are in place. In my experience, that is what really makes the difference in someone's educational experience. I think in many places in the US, people expect the school systems to work in a vaccuum- but education is always a two way street no matter what type of system you are in...
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 8:31pm

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devilskater

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I didn't read all the posts, but keeping to the topic, I have been to the US plenty of times...there are alot of fat people...but I found that in Vancouver, Canada there are a lot more grously fat people.

The education in the US in my eyes is pretty weak. Kids in my class, who weren't necessarily the brightest went to america for a year (mostly, because they would have flunked school, and that was a way to bypass this). Once in america, they only had straight A's. As I was told, a lot of students didn't bother learning for classes, because they focused on their sport careers...
This doesn't mean, that I claim that all schools in america are bad. I can just base my opinion on facts that I have heared, or read. What I think is really good though, is that the US schoolsystem is built up in modules...you have a filmmaking class (module), some other art classes...and that you can choose your modules (classes).

We don't have that possibility...we have to do the classes that the government tells us to do (which is: German, English, French, Latin, Maths, History, Chemistry, Biology, Sport Ed, Physics, and other classes i can't think of right now). We learn alot...in history we learnt pretty much everything there is to know about history...university standard, which pissed most of my class mates off, but fortunately I love history so it didn't bother me, that it was a challenge. Unfortunately, the austrian system doesn't support much art-based topics and classes...so we lack a lot of that...

but anyways...we europeans aren't any better than you guys, cause we are allowed to drink alcohol with 16, which (scuse my french) fu**s up our brains anyways biggrin

cheers,
d.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 9:10pm

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Bryce007

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As I previously stated, Devilskater---

Nikola Tesla. Supermodels. Austria FTW.
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 9:34pm

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ben3308

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devilskater wrote:

We don't have that possibility...we have to do the classes that the government tells us to do (which is: German, English, French, Latin, Maths, History, Chemistry, Biology, Sport Ed, Physics, and other classes i can't think of right now). We learn alot...in history we learnt pretty much everything there is to know about history...university standard, which pissed most of my class mates off, but fortunately I love history so it didn't bother me, that it was a challenge.
Just to clear up any misinformation, America schools- both on the federal and state level- do have required core subjects (English, a Social Study of some sort, a certain number of math levels, certain number of science levels) and in Texas some of the required coursework is even more rigorous. We do have standards (it would be ignorant of the education system not to), and they are quite often met by the student populus with great aplomb.

We also have a requirement (at least in Texas) for classes that extend our reach as 'cultured' individuals: an arts course is required, as is three years of a foreign language. Now I'm not that great at the language I spent time learning (I accelerated my courses in middle school and got half of it out of the way then, so it was more rushed), but there is a reason my profile says I can speak Spanish, if not brokenly so. biggrin

You might also say that the requirement of you to learn so many languages is similar to the requirement of us to learn so much American history and social politics: it's a cultural necessity. Because you live in areas where you likely need to know those languages to communicate appropriately, they are taught. Likewise, Americans learn more about other regions of America by virtue of the fact that they, too, do not want to be ill-prepared or out of place- even if it is in their own country. This ultimately comes down to not just a cultured refinement, but a utilitarian necessity. We need to know a sufficient amount about America to be able to travel within it. The differences between myself and even those just a state over is phenomenal, and this simply can't be overlooked.

Furthermore, most schools offer- and many have a requirement for- AP courses, which test and are taught on college levels (which is 'university' for y'all, not college) and are often so rigorous that the scores on them qualify as credit. I attend an extremely reputable university in America, and yet they have given me credit for ALL of my required math and science courses and roughly half of my English classes. If that's not a testament to the fortitude of the American public education system, I dunno what is. biggrin

And even though I may not have appreciated some of the caveats of my high school and its policies (didn't help my college admissions at all, regrettably); I am still proud to be a product of American public education, simply because it has served me extremely well. Though I can, of course, concede that my case is not universal, I believe that on a general scale, the opportunities that I had (white middle class coming from a lower-scale neighborhood, coincidentally the archetype of the average teenaged American male) are attainable for most anyone in the United States. It is for this reason that I make my stand: that American education is not the obscene farce it is often storied to be.

Last edited Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 9:44pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 9:40pm

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devilskater

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ben3308 wrote:


Honestly, like 40% of the greatest inventions of the world are American-made. I'll give Gutenberg the number one spot on a list of 100, but Americans take a lot of those top spots as well. It's not we got to be the largest economic, sociocultural, and military power in the world by not having some upper hand in our intellect.
LoL, actually none of that is american-made my friend...If the Russians would have captured the GERMAN scientist Wernher von Braun after WWII, it would be Russia that would lead in technical and scientific warfare, and it would be Russia that would be economicaly superior...

He built the V-1 and V-2 Rockets, the first guided missile -> which lead to the Apollo 11 mission to the moon -> which revolutionized aeroplanes...etc...etc..

Without him, you wouldn't have won the race to the moon, you wouldn't have such an economic effect on the world...

but you don't have that anyways anymore, cause you guys are pretty damn broke biggrin

But what I hate about people who hate america...is that they critisise america for intervening in other countries problems...but when these vary people need help, they critise, why doesn't the US help us...

The USofA somehow cannot please everyone...which is unfortunate...


VOTE FOR OBAMA DUMBOS !!! biggrin[/b]
Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 9:58pm

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D3L3T10N

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devilskater wrote:


He [Werner Von Braun] built the V-1 and V-2 Rockets, the first guided missile -> which lead to the Apollo 11 mission to the moon -> which revolutionized aeroplanes...etc...etc..

Without him, you wouldn't have won the race to the moon, you wouldn't have such an economic effect on the world...
We've done many other things that have had much larger economic effect on the world than going into space. Like inventing and putting to use the first practical atomic bomb. I'm not saying it was a good economic effect, but nonetheless...

Last edited Tue, 24th Jun 2008, 12:30pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Mon, 23rd Jun 2008, 10:03pm

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ben3308

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I didn't realize when I started this thread that it would be such a talking point. Then again, I've tried to be on point lately, what with this news, the George Carlin and Stan Winston things, and my movies list. But honestly, haha, I spent forever on my 13 page movies list but I suppose the America vs. world thing makes for more controversy, so is more prevalent on here. biggrin
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2008, 10:19pm

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Bryan M Block

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All I have to say about America's education system is:

Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2008, 11:20pm

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CX3

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Rating: +1

Hey don't judge all of America based on that picture. Besides, it looks like that was taken in Texas... Judge them...

heh
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2008, 11:28pm

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Fill

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I'm sure all of America isn't stupid, but I saw this video a while ago and nearly broke my keyboard after smashing my head on it multiple times:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=fJuNgBkloFE
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2008, 11:36pm

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Bryan M Block

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CX3 wrote:

Hey don't judge all of America based on that picture. Besides, it looks like that was taken in Texas... Judge them...

heh
That was the point- Ben is from Texas and I am having a bit of fun at his expense. I am an American as well...
Posted: Thu, 26th Jun 2008, 12:02am

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CX3

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I know man. I was playin along w/ the joke.

Now you just made it awkward...

haha
Posted: Thu, 26th Jun 2008, 12:26am

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ben3308

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Eh....from what I've noticed, the 10 or 12 Texans on here are a lot less 'standout' in stupidity as a lot of reeeeally sketchy mid-West folk I've seen on here. biggrin

But you all know me, relatively at least. You know I'm not stupid. smile

As for the 'Americans are NOT stupid questions': a LOT of those are questions are pointed or wrong heavily because of the accent of the interviewer (no offense). As an American, if I dumbed down my view on things, I don't think I would know the answer of most of the ones involving names, places, or specific words (like 'mosque') because I would assume they were something different than what I pronounce them to be. But we all know these aren't indicate of the populus at all. Otherwise, Britain is the same. biggrin
Posted: Thu, 26th Jun 2008, 7:52am

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Sollthar

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Intelligence and knowledge are two different things. wink
Posted: Thu, 26th Jun 2008, 9:13am

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ben3308

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And stupidity is, in all honesty, relative. biggrin
Posted: Thu, 26th Jun 2008, 2:15pm

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Bryan M Block

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I think you have taken all of this on a bit personally Ben- no one is claiming anything about YOU or me for that matter- but if, for example 60% of American high school seniors can't point out "North America" on a world map- it IS a fair assumption that that particular problem is systemic. While I am exaggerating a bit, there have been studies done and they have made findings such as this over and over again in a variety of areas...

While these studies don't indicate whether or not someone is "stupid" they do indicate a general lack of knowledge in certain core subjects. For example, most Europeans I've known are much more functionally aware of geography and world history than most Americans I know, regardless of educational background. Why? I don't know- I would guess that those subjects have a higher importance in their educational system than they do in ours - and as you pointed out there is a bit of isolationism in American culture becuase things can be different just one state away, but isn't that what the rest of the world is like too?