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STAR WARS based films? Why we buy FXhome?

Why did you buy FXhome software?

Lightsabers40%[ 14 ]
Chroma Key31%[ 11 ]
Particle Engine11%[ 4 ]
Grading17%[ 6 ]

Total Votes : 35

Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 6:42am

Post 1 of 25

Moonloon1

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OK, so why do I feel like there's so much distaste for some of us wanting to make STAR WARS based films? Yeah I know it's been done to death and I am just as disappointed with Episodes I, II, and III as anyone else, though III was kind of OK. I know Jar Jar totally sucked and ruined I & II for me. That and way too much CGI along with bad choices for actors in some cases. I really only like IV and V and I'm not a big fan of VI. I am quite sure that Star Wars Lightsabers and greenscreen effects are the main reason most of us bought this software. I was looking for a way to do lightsabers and tried a few free downloads until I came across FXhome. Since the first Star Trek series came to our, at the time, three channels I wanted to do this kind of stuff and until recently you could not afford to come close. Our first video camera was a piece of junk VHS and you could not edit if you had to unless you could spend $25,000.00 and up, besides the picture quality of VHS sucks! I went through 8mm same problem, quality and editing capabilities SUCKED! You can thank ILM for NLE's and much of the software available today even FXhome. Besides I make movies just for the fun of it and the learning experience that goes along with it. Just wanted to see what's up with that and maybe ruffle some feathers?

Last edited Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 8:20pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 7:31am

Post 2 of 25

Sollthar

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Personally, I've never been a Star Wars fan. I kinda like the old ones, but totally dislike the newer ones. Star Wars has never interested me much though, so adding lightsabers to a film is entirely nothing for me. Never done it, have no desire to ever.

However, the fxhome software has some nice abilities I use for more advanced compositing and grading stuff. That's pretty much what I do actually use it for. I've not yet needed the particle engine (I go for real stock footage or use Cinema4D's particle emitters since I have more 3D control over everything there).
So I mainly do most of my compositing in there, little else nowadays.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 8:54am

Post 3 of 25

ben3308

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I bought (or half-bought with someone else) AlamDV back in the day because I was mesmerized with how easy-to-use the software was in terms of compositing and placing image streams in the form of plugins. As thousands of plugins existed at my time of purchase, I dreamt about the possibilities all the way up until I actually bought the software.

Short of lightsabers, I got AlamDV to do just what was advertised in the promo: composite in and appropriately move/scale liquid, dust, plasma, light and muzzle effects. And this was all of five years ago.

Now it's a completely different generation of media we're able to produce. The software hasn't just evolved, it's been repurposed, and image streams are but a speck in its range of possibilities. Because of this, I think many buy the new (relative to my purchases, at least) products because of two things they are proficient at creating and manipulating: muzzle effects and light objects, be them in the form of optics or swords.

These days, we'll use ELab for mostly muzzle flashes, although we do throw the occasional light effect or grade its way. That, and I use VideoWrap for just about everything I do in regard to video.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 12:19pm

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RodyPolis

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I really had no interest in star wars when I bought composite lab lite. I remember just being impressed with the greenscreen. it seemed like there was no limit to what I could do.

When I first got it I tried to much to do everything in special effects. which made me never do anything big, so now I calmed down and only use it in my movie(and webseries) when I need to.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 1:17pm

Post 5 of 25

Paradox Pictures

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I first was looking for a lightsaber program. Now I use everything in Effects Lab Pro.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 1:34pm

Post 6 of 25

Simon K Jones

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Back in the day, 90% of our users definitely got started with our software to do lightsabery fun stuff. These days I think the muzzle flash engine is probably the biggest draw, and the general compositing abilities.

Not sure why you're getting this feeling - are there any particular posts that have made you think this?

If there's a 'distaste' for Star Wars fanfilms (and distaste is probably too strong a word), it's probably for a very simple reason: the Star Wars films have finished. During the mass excitement surrounding the prequels, everyone loved fanfilms. It's now several years since episode 3, and I think people have simply seen enough official and unofficial Star Wars fanfilms. Hence any perceived apathy.

However, if you want to continue making them, nobody's going to try to stop you. razz
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 1:43pm

Post 7 of 25

Biblmac

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Well I have to say I was one of the people who was looking for a lightsaber program, (found a free one, but it wasn't as good as I wanted), however that free one eventually led me here. When I first found Effects Lab Lite, I wanted it for the fact that it had a neon light engine that I could make lightswords out of... however, since then I don't really use it at all. I just, like RodyPolis, use the effects when necessary.

PS: Where is the all of the above answer... (to the poll)
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 3:38pm

Post 8 of 25

Rockfilmers

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I had Composite Lab before Vision Lab and I used it for keying and grading. I've never been a big fan film fan of anything. I almost feel like the rip the original off. but, when I was like 7, me and my friends had toy lightsabers that would beat up on each other with. The very most common effects I use are grading and keying. I used the muzzle flash engine once and I've never (yet) had a need for particles or optics.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 7:17pm

Post 9 of 25

Serpent

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I bought AlamDV looking at FXHome's forgotten product: iPlugins for iMovie. Chromanator updates were just starting to come about, and I just followed peoples' films and saw what could be done with it. The demo was easy enough to use, and I'm still here. smile Though I'm not really into VFX and whatnot anymore. CX3, Sollthar, sssjaaron, sidewinder/Mecha, the Ho brothers are just a few of the filmmakers who made stuff that drew me in.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 7:25pm

Post 10 of 25

Thrawn

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It was really my fascination with greenscreen that got me into compositelab, and eventually the possibility of creating muzzle flashes that got me into effectslab. Though I'm a big star wars fan, lightsabers weren't a deciding factor in me buying a FXhome product.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 8:27pm

Post 11 of 25

Moonloon1

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Tarn wrote:

Not sure why you're getting this feeling - are there any particular posts that have made you think this?
Well, Yes, I posted some pre-production shots for comments on effects and grading, no one replied. Lots of people looked but no one posted so I deleted it, some other posts I've read seem to indicate this. I wasn't asking if anyone liked Star Wars based films jut some critique on how I'm using the software. It's OK, I'm a big boy, I have a blast anyway. I'm just trying to figure out mindsets here.
Posted: Tue, 3rd Mar 2009, 9:21pm

Post 12 of 25

Atom

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Lack-of-interest isn't distaste, Moonloon. Just because I look at a car but don't buy it doesn't mean I hate it.

And people here do have some reservations about Star Wars fanfilms- but not about the movies themselves, rather, the hype and fanbase some of these movies draw. A tired fanbase and overdone/outrun hype in many people's eyes, mine included, puts us off from the responses, but not the film. This is the very reason 'tribute' threads to the likes of Ryan W. and his movies pass by as kind of 'meh.....whatever' often.

This isn't to say people dislike the films themselves, though. Last year Art of the Saber, a masterwork of a Star Wars fanfilm, generated the most downloads on the site. In fact, I myself have been planning a very 'Atomic-y' lightsaber fight for quite some time now, just never got around to shooting it. biggrin
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 1:25am

Post 13 of 25

Limey

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I bought chromy because I saw the nightcast visual concept 2 video. The starwars thing never really interested me but some people have done some cool things in that theme.
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 2:56am

Post 14 of 25

Moonloon1

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And no I am not a "Fan" (stems from the word fanatic) I am not fanatical about anything. I just like the worlds George Lucas presented and want to write my own fun stories based on those worlds. And maybe distaste was not the proper word. I too find the hype and fanbase of anything distasteful. I work in the music business and the ego's there are sometimes way over the top but I still love my job.
I was more touched by this movie than any other I have ever seen and I know there are many films that are much better. I remember the theater, who I went with and everything about that night more than any movie I have seen before or since.

Currently the poll seems to be agreeing with the why.

Distaste does not imply hate.
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 3:23am

Post 15 of 25

Atom

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Moonloon1 wrote:

And no I am not a "Fan" (stems from the word fanatic) I am not fanatical about anything.
Spoken like a true Star Wars fan/Trekkie in nerd-denial. smile
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 6:01am

Post 16 of 25

spydurhank

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I bought V.L. for grading and keying mainly but then figured, it has these other engines that can do some great stuff so I made the time to learn how to use them all.
The particle engine took the most time for me to learn.
Then a while later I learned that there's more to filmmaking than just visual effects.
Bless the forums, I'd probably be lost with out them.
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 7:03am

Post 17 of 25

ben3308

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On the note of distaste towards Star Wars films, I just think that extra creativity is a prerequisite since the genre is now old-and-busted. A shining example of new life being breathed into that general area is The Terra-Cotta Soldier, which, despite having kids and being a crossover piece, shows real promise and development in the land of post-ep-III fanfilms.
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 9:57am

Post 18 of 25

Simon K Jones

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Yeah, I think that's a good point. Having spaceships and lightsabers in an amateur movie is no longer an amazing thing: anybody can do it (although it's remarkable how many people still do it badly!).

Increasingly I think amateur films are being judged along more professional criteria. 10 years ago having a special effect in your movie, regardless of its quality, was enough to get people excited. These days there are far fewer technical and financial boundaries, so people are looking for quality in other areas: core ideas, storytelling, acting, visual innovation etc.

For example, while I no longer have much interest in generic Star Wars fanfilms, if somebody were to create a film that focused on an underused and interesting aspect of the Star Wars universe (maybe one of the characters from the Mos Eisley cantina, or Jabba's palace, etc) I'd be there.

It's not the Star Wars universe that has been overdone, not at all. The problem is that fanfilms only seem to focus on a tiny portion of that universe: in other words, Jedi and Sith combat. What about the bounty hunters, the slave traders, the smugglers, all those backstreets you glimpse in the original trilogy? That's where the real interest lies.

Tellingly, the very first 'big' Star Wars fanfilm, Troops, did exactly that. It focused on a comparatively minor element and explored it with humour and attention to detail. Films that focus on the Jedi/lightsaber aspects are never going to work as well for me, because they inevitably can't be as good as the official films.
Posted: Wed, 4th Mar 2009, 1:45pm

Post 19 of 25

Moonloon1

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Tarn wrote:

Yeah, I think that's a good point. Having spaceships and lightsabers in an amateur movie is no longer an amazing thing: anybody can do it (although it's remarkable how many people still do it badly!).

Increasingly I think amateur films are being judged along more professional criteria. 10 years ago having a special effect in your movie, regardless of its quality, was enough to get people excited. These days there are far fewer technical and financial boundaries, so people are looking for quality in other areas: core ideas, storytelling, acting, visual innovation etc.

For example, while I no longer have much interest in generic Star Wars fanfilms, if somebody were to create a film that focused on an underused and interesting aspect of the Star Wars universe (maybe one of the characters from the Mos Eisley cantina, or Jabba's palace, etc) I'd be there.

It's not the Star Wars universe that has been overdone, not at all. The problem is that fanfilms only seem to focus on a tiny portion of that universe: in other words, Jedi and Sith combat. What about the bounty hunters, the slave traders, the smugglers, all those backstreets you glimpse in the original trilogy? That's where the real interest lies.

Tellingly, the very first 'big' Star Wars fanfilm, Troops, did exactly that. It focused on a comparatively minor element and explored it with humour and attention to detail. Films that focus on the Jedi/lightsaber aspects are never going to work as well for me, because they inevitably can't be as good as the official films.
I agree on all of your points.

My son is three, Star Wars is new and cool to him.
I am new to VFX about 1 year and five months.
I have only seen about six fan films. I don't care for most of them.
I am focusing on a story about a young Jedi that leaves the order becomes a trader and the story takes place before Ep.I.
I must use humor because my son will be nearly all the actors in the film. Good & Bad.
All I ask is advice from most of the people that took the time to post here.
You are the ones I respect the most as far as knowledge with the software.
And again I'm just having fun and soon I will also burn out on the VFX and I might get serious about filmmaking. But I know from my experience with music that it's nearly impossible to be a world class filmmaker or musician. But, the future of visual entertainment is going to be this web site's cinema and others like it on the web. The writing is on the wall or the computer screen... and it's quickly attaching to our big screen TV's. A popcorn maker is already in the corner of our screening room.
Posted: Thu, 5th Mar 2009, 6:13am

Post 20 of 25

Moonloon1

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Rating: +1

Atom wrote:

Moonloon1 wrote:

And no I am not a "Fan" (stems from the word fanatic) I am not fanatical about anything.
Spoken like a true Star Wars fan/Trekkie in nerd-denial. smile
I'm Batman
Posted: Mon, 9th Mar 2009, 2:47pm

Post 21 of 25

Moonloon1

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By the way Atom I was playing Batman a very, very long time before you ever pooped in your diapers.
Posted: Mon, 9th Mar 2009, 2:48pm

Post 22 of 25

Atom

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Doubtful. I'm really 72-years-old. wink

Way to triple post, by the way.
Posted: Mon, 9th Mar 2009, 3:42pm

Post 23 of 25

Moonloon1

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Atom wrote:

Doubtful. I'm really 72-years-old. wink

Way to triple post, by the way.
No, I believe this makes seven.
Posted: Mon, 9th Mar 2009, 4:25pm

Post 24 of 25

Tim L

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Atom wrote:

Way to triple post, by the way.
I just don't get why it bothers anyone that somebody double-posts or triple-posts. Especially when those three posts span a five-day period.

If moon had just edited the first of those three posts each time he added a comment, the thread would not show that any new content had been added.

Why does it bother people to have consecutive posts from the same person? I just don't understand...
Posted: Mon, 9th Mar 2009, 4:32pm

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Simon K Jones

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Tim L wrote:

Why does it bother people to have consecutive posts from the same person? I just don't understand...
The structure of this kind of forum works on a reply-reply-reply basis. Every subsequent post should be a response that furthers the discussion to some degree, from a new poster. That's what makes a forum different to, say, IRC or messenger.

When people double-post it breaks this structure and makes the layout more difficult to read. This is why the 'edit' button is provided, to keep things nice and tidy and easy to scan.

As you say, if Moonloon had edited his original post nobody would have noticed his extra replies, but that would probably have been for the best given their somewhat pointless nature. If you get a notification of a new reply, you want actual new content, not someone adding on a random addendum/afterthought.

It encourages people to actually think about their posts, to ensure that they get it right, rather than just posting endless extra bits.

Bottom line is that it's just accepted 'forum etiquette'.