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CLAB Green screening tutorial

Posted: Fri, 12th Jun 2009, 2:29pm

Post 1 of 6

DVStudio

Force: 4983 | Joined: 22nd Nov 2007 | Posts: 1845

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User PhotoKey 4 User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

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Rating: +3

Hey there!

Here is a tutorial that will attempt to explain ways in which you can make your greenscreen keys look more natural and less of a copy and paste job! Surprisingly, there are a number of things you can do that can really enhance your chroma key effect!

What you’ll need:
FX Home Composite Lab Pro or I imagine Vision Lab would work too.
Your green screen video clip (will require greenscreen (available from www.tubetape.com ), video camera, and a subject to film)
A computer (Duh!)JK

Getting started:
1. Open Composite Lab Pro

2. Select your video clip

3. Adjust project settings (including frame rate, aspect ratio, and scan method)

4. Now your window should look like this:

5. Now import your background image or video

How to do it:
1.You are going to want to Increase the saturation on your subject clip (this is the green/blue screen clip) in order to bring the green or blue coloring out more which will make it easier to key.

2.Now we are going to apply a color difference key and you are going to have to reduce the white until all of the green or blue is gone.

Be sure to choose green for green screen and blue for blue screen or it won’t work!!

3.As you can see, in parts the image is see through and the key is rather jagged. No problem. To fix the see through, we are just going to have to bring the black up a little

4.Now you can see some jagged green (or blue) edges. To fix this, go to the media tab, right click your clip and click on media properties . Now change the UV blur method to Gaussian and reduce it to 1 or 2. (you can change it to different UV settings to get the best edges based on your individual footage)

5.Now, to get rid of the remaining green or blue edges, apply spill suppression under grading (once again, be sure to choose blue or green depending on the color of your screen) smile

6.Now to get rid of that cookie cutter, copy-paste look, add a Gaussian blur and set it to about 3 or 4

7.Now, cut away un-needed parts of your subject clip using a garbage matte and add your background image


8.Now we will adjust the lighting and contrast:
-The best way to do this is to use a de-saturating key and make everything black and white

-Now using the contrast pro, raise the blacks in the subject to match those in the background image/footage

-Now, bring the highlights back into the image by lower the whites in the subject

Should look something like this:

-Now we are going to get rid of the black and white effect

-Finally, lower the subject clip’s saturation to match the color grade with background


9.Last step, I promise. This step is to use ambient light effect to bring a sort of “natural reflection” in the subject by choosing a color from the background image that represents the overall lighting/ color in the background image


Your finished piece should look similar to this:


See, much better right? No jagged lines, no spilled green or blue that the key missed. Pretty cool right? And that didn’t take very long either did it? For some more adjustments, try playing around with some sharpening, some blurs, and some more of the lighting presets (especially the brightness and contrast settings to try and match your background some more!)

Example: this was done with an angle blur to the background, some brightness decrease in the subject and some sharpening.


10.Render (save) your project and show it off!


Well, good luck with your projects and maybe if you play around with it some more, you could find something even cooler!

For some more green and blue screen tutorials see these:

The Basics: Green/ Blue Screen
Lighting: Green and Blue Screens

PM me with any questions, or ask here!

Cheers,
DV

P.S. Some of the images may be hard to read- I was using my laptop and it is definately not as good at screen shots as my dekstops. Oh well. But you can view them in larger sizes in my albumhere

P.P.S the formating for the old post was a little off- it was difficult to coordinate so much stuff and images smile So I remade the topic.

Well anyways, there is your tutorial. Enjoy.
Posted: Sun, 14th Jun 2009, 2:52pm

Post 2 of 6

TubeTape

Force: 9542 | Joined: 24th May 2007 | Posts: 169

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXpreset Maker Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Great info. We will be sure to pass it along. Thanks for posting this.
Posted: Sun, 14th Jun 2009, 4:26pm

Post 3 of 6

DVStudio

Force: 4983 | Joined: 22nd Nov 2007 | Posts: 1845

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User PhotoKey 4 User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

TubeTape wrote:

Great info. We will be sure to pass it along. Thanks for posting this.
Yeah, sure. Thanks for commenting. Glad you found it useful or informative.
Posted: Sun, 14th Jun 2009, 4:29pm

Post 4 of 6

Terminal Velocity

Force: 2507 | Joined: 7th Apr 2008 | Posts: 1350

VisionLab User FXpreset Maker Windows User

Gold Member

Good, that's a nice tut.
Posted: Fri, 8th Apr 2011, 4:35pm

Post 5 of 6

filmmer1114

Force: 0 | Joined: 8th Apr 2011 | Posts: 5

Member

can you explain how to put the image in the bluescreen?
Posted: Fri, 8th Apr 2011, 5:04pm

Post 6 of 6

EJR32123

Force: 861 | Joined: 29th Nov 2010 | Posts: 85

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User MacOS User

Gold Member

Hi

You have to film your actor in front of the blue screen.