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Harry Potter 6

Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 9:15am

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Atom

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Uncommonly, surprising, utterly............amazing. Go see it, now. I had little to no interested and am still glad I saw a movie that ran until 3am when I've got work at 8am. It was that worth it.

Not better than Star Trek, but damn near close. Poetic in every way the previous films weren't, serious where all it's predecessor remained silly or preposterous. Humorous and immaculately, impeccably, excellently paced.

This is the best parts of Alfonso Cuaron's film, the third movie, mixed with the strengths of all the others into an amalgamation that makes it, easily, the best of all the Potter movies- and one of the most-shining fantasy films to date.

10/10- A sheer shock and surprise of a masterpiece. Speechless, for the most part. It took every bit and piece of the series and turned it in the right direction, the most-appropriate direction, and the most entertaining and believable one.

And for this, above all, it succeeds- much in the way Star Trek did, actually. An uncommonly good, surprising film. Not much more to say, for now at least.
Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 2:28pm

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jawajohnny

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Rating: +1

Great! It's good to see that pretty much everyone likes it so far, fans, audiences, and critics alike. The rotten tomatoes rating is really encouraging (and none of the negative reviews make sense, heh). But of course I'll reserve judgment until I see it for myself later today. smile

I think it would be a good idea to warn everyone about spoilers. There's a pretty huge event towards the end of the film, and I don't think we'll be able to discuss the movie without frequently mentioning said event... and putting spoiler warnings all over the place will be pretty tedious. So if you haven't read the book and haven't seen the movie yet... proceed with caution... smile Just thought I'd give a friendly warning, because it seems like at least one person gets spoiled every time there's a movie discussion here.
Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 2:42pm

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DVStudio

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Yeah, great idea JawaJohnny. It can be a pain to have to write "spoilers here on in" and all.

The book was excellent (I read it a while back when it came out) but still remember most of it. I amlooking forward to seeing this movie later today and adding my review. Hopefully I too will enjoy the movie (for the most part all the other reviews said it was the best so far) and they were all generally positive.

The PG rating is what had me worried it was going to be shitty, but mainly because the last two were PG-13 and pretty good. I guess that wasn't the case with this though!

Looking forward to seeing it!
Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 3:06pm

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jawajohnny

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Yeah, generally we'd just put a warning when we're about to mention something a spoiler, but in this case, we'll be talking about that significant spoiler quite a bit, so it might be a good idea to avoid this topic until you've seen the movie. smile

And apparently the PG rating isn't a problem. One of the producers says he doesn't know what the MPAA was thinking of, to rate it PG.
Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 6:18pm

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Evman

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I saw it last night at a midnight show: a pretty good film marred by a few big problems that, IMO, keep it from unseating #s 3 and 5 from the top spots. It's good, but not the grand opus the reviews might lead you to believe. Expect a much more detailed review later when I get off work and to a proper keyboard... wink
Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 7:21pm

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Thrawn

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I know I know.. I have to wait until friday to see it, and it's absolutely killing me.. Ahhhhhh..
Posted: Wed, 15th Jul 2009, 8:46pm

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DVStudio

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Thrawn wrote:

I know I know.. I have to wait until friday to see it, and it's absolutely killing me.. Ahhhhhh..
Yeah, I'm on vacation and they only had it show once today! Once on the whole island. Have to see it tomorrow and need to find a chick to go with me smile Hehe
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 2:30am

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jawajohnny

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Okay... sorry for the long post, but I have a lot to say about this. Hopefully you'll get something out of it. smile

Easily the best film of the series. 1-5 were all good movies, but they all had a few flaws that kept them from achieving true excellence. The first two films suffered from the inclusion of too much info from the books. On the other hand, Prisoner of Azkaban didn't have quite enough exposition. Goblet of Fire got a couple things entirely wrong, especially Dumbledore's character. He would never, ever grab Harry and yell at him. To me, that slightly diminishes the gentle old man quality he is supposed to have. Order of the Phoenix, as good as it was, failed to completely nail home the relationship between Harry and Voldemort. Half-Blood Prince is the first film in the series that doesn't do anything wrong. The first five films suffered suffered because the filmmakers didn't entirely know where the series was going. Conversely, Half-Blood Prince benefits from the knowledge of how the series will end. If you're observant, it's full of details, nuances, and hints of things that will happen in the final two films.

I can't stand people who think the movie should be exactly like the book. A lot of the stuff in the book would be confusing and/or look foolishly out of place in the movie. For example, the opening scene of the book (in which the Minister of Magic informs the Muggle Prime Minister that recent tragic events are the work of Voldemort) would be too talky and very confusing. In the movie, we get to see Death Eaters take down a bridge and ravage the wizarding community. It's much more dramatic, and it effectively establishes that everyone is in real danger. The same goes for the attack on the Weasley house. No, it wasn't in the books, but it's a better way of showing the true danger they are in (rather than just reading the names of people who have died in the Daily Prophet, like in the books). The sense of dread, and danger is really done well. My point is, that almost all the departures from the book are for the better.

The romantic parts are really funny... really great stuff. Half-Blood Prince is about two main things: The Harry/Dumbledore relationship, and the beginnings of the inevitable romances. I think the film does a brilliant job setting up the Ron/Hermione relationship... I really appreciated that a lot of these scenes were taken verbatim from the book and/or improved upon. The Harry/Ginny relationship felt a little underdone, but it's adequate enough.

While some Potter fans will probably disagree with me here, I think the Harry/Dumbledore parts are exceptional. No, of course they can't include all of the memory sequences from the book. But we get to see the two most important ones. In the first, we get to see Dumbledore recruiting young Tom Riddle from the orphanage. We can see he already has a knack for collecting objects that aren't necessarily his. Then in Slughorn's memory, we see that he is interested in splitting his soul, and storing the pieces in various objects. This memory sort of confirms what Dumbledore has been suspecting: that Voldemort has taken great steps to immortality, splitting his soul into seven pieces and storing them in different objects. I was worried that we wouldn't learn enough about the Horcruxes that have already been destroyed, but indeed, Dumbledore reveals he has already destroyed a ring, and that Harry has already destroyed Tom Riddle's diary from the second film. Appropriately, that leaves four horcruxes, plus Voldemort himself. In the book, Dumbledore's extensive studies of different memories leaves him (and Harry) with a good idea of what the remaining horcruxes are, but in this film, Harry has no idea what they are. However, I'm sure the next film will fully explain everything horcrux related. I also like the little detail of Harry twitching his head like Voldemort does (after touching the ring)... it's a very subtle hint about a very crucial plot element in the final chapters of book 7, movie 8.

The final half-hour is pure cinematic greatness. Dumbledore has his finest on-screen moments... moments that propel him past Gandalf, Obi-wan, and any other old, wise, mentor. When he produced the ring of fire, I got tears in my eyes for the first time in the entire series. Then of course, the events after that scene are wonderfully depicted... more powerful than in the book, in fact. Harry has a choice, and he trusts Dumbledore who trusts Snape. The scene with Snape and Dumbledore arguing is one of the strongest scenes of the series. It works exactly how it should: It looks as if Snape is sick of putting himself at risk being a double agent for Dumbledore. However, as some of us know, the heart of the matter is something else. You can tell that that scene was filmed with book 7 in mind. The same thing goes for the actual killing of Dumbledore. It has nuances that were not present in the novel. That being said, the two strongest performances in the film come from Alan Rickman (who has always been the best in the series) and Michael Gambon, who finally gets some decent material to work with. I can't wait to see Rickman's final performances as the strongest character of the series, and I'm also quite excited for Gambon's one last scene. All the other actors are great, like always. However, I was a little disappointed with Tom Felton as Malfoy. Sure, he's very convincing ("I've got to kill you, or he'll kill me"), but I think he could have done much more with the role.

Okay, I don't want to get into too many more details. So to sum up, the movie opens brilliantly, immediately establishing the Dumbledore/Harry relationship. The majority of the film focuses on characters... and it's definitely the strongest character development of the series so far. The film is funny, dark, and most importantly, emotionally powerful in all the right spots. Overall, it's a perfect film. Not exactly like the book... but it doesn't, and shouldn't have to be. Yes, it does feel like just a big set up for Deathly Hallows... but that was always the intention. If there's anything bad about the movie, it's that we're left wanting more. Since I've read the entire series, I almost feel slighted, because I know there are bigger and better things to come... they're clearly purposely saving a load of information for the epic finales. Half-Blood Prince is a truly excellent film, but still not quite the epic cinematic achievement we know the final two films will be. November 2010 and July 2011 can't come soon enough.

The series so far:

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: 9/10
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets: 9/10
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban: 9/10
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: 8/10
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix: 9/10
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince: 10/10

Alright, that was easily the longest post I've written. smile I'm very interested in seeing you guys' reactions, readers and non-readers alike. I'll undoubtedly have more to say later... razz
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 3:40am

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Evman

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Ok so maybe I have to see the movie again to formulate a more concrete opinion and/or let things grow on me. All I know is that after I stepped out the theater after Prisoner of Azkaban and Order of the Phoenix, I IMMEDIATELY knew I had just seen great films. This time... not so much.

Don't get me wrong - there is an OVERWHELMING amount of stuff that this movie does right. Little nuances in artistry are all over this - and you can really feel the time put into this movie. So what the hell is wrong with it?

It's not the acting - that's phenomenal across the board. This movie lives and breathes because of the main trio of Harry, Ron, and Hermione, who by now are played to absolute perfection by Daniel, Rupert, and Emma. The supporting kids are all excellent as well, and do I REALLY need to say anything about the 200 million incredible thespians filling out the adult cast (Jim Broadbent, Alan Rickman, Michael Gambon, Maggie Smith, just to name a few). The problem definitely doesn't lie in the actors. The movie is at its most enjoyable, and firing on all cylinders when they are doing their thing.

It's not any of the technicals - as the special effects/cinematography/sound design/etc are all as solid as a Potter film has ever been.

The problem lies in the fact that, like the 1st, 2nd, and 4th films before it, it seemed to be chugging along going through the motions of including certain things in the plot just because they were there, without actually properly setting them up in the films.

Harry's relationship with Ginny is one of the sweetest and most tender parts of the books - a subplot that builds over the course of 6 books until the kiss in the middle of Half Blood Prince. While the romance worked completely because of (wouldn't you know it) the acting of the two, it simply did not feel earned. Their sudden love for each other springs up seemingly out of nowhere for anyone uninitiated with the books, and ultimately feels like it was included just because "it's in the book, so it needs to be there".

Same with the relationship between Hermione and Ron. There have been hints here and there throughout the movies so far, but again, Hermione's 180 degree flip from a bookworm above petty teenage relationships to pining after Ron just didn't seem justified by the film. Granted, at least Emma Watson managed to keep her from becoming generic female stereotype and stripping her of all that made her such a great, independent character (I'm looking in YOUR direction Padme Amidala from Star Wars Episode 3...) But again, that was Emma's doing, not the scripts'.

There are plenty of things in this movie that I didn't think were earned and were only relevant if you'd read the books.

As fun as the Weasley twin's shop is - it was completely unnecessary. As cool as it was to see Aragog's dead body - his appearance was completely random and unecessary given that that subplot from the book was cut out of the film completely until 3/4 of the way in. It served no purpose. It just again felt like - "It's in the book, and I'm too lazy to come up with a clever way to rewriting it, and people will want to see this, so I'll just throw it in there".

Now usually I hate people that get pissed when scenes get cut from the books. I think those people don't understand the concept of "adaptation". That being said, when cutting out a scene from the book directly invalidates the entire movie - I have a problem with it.

Case in point: The battle scene at Hogwarts that happened in the book during the confrontation with Dumbledore. I understand perfectly the reasons why it was cut. They didn't want to step on the heels of the Battle of Hogwarts in the Deathly Hallows - I get that. They wanted a more emotional climax than an action one. I understand that too. In a way it worked. But let's just think about this for ONE second, and we'll discover perhaps the biggest plot hole in the history of the film series (not present in the books).

Draco Malfoy spent the ENTIRE year fixing the cabinet so the death eaters could enter the castle. Plenty of screentime was given to his exploits (quite cleverly I might add). Here we have a character on a mission - trying to achieve a goal. A goal so important he broods over it for an entire year.

And then, finally he succeeds! He allows the Death Eaters access to Hogwarts. After a dramatic scene of them showing up, we think "wow - he's really done it!".

Not so fast.

They then proceed to cut out ANY semblance of purpose for the Death Eaters to be there. Draco and Snape are the only ones involved in killing Dumbledore - the Death Eaters literally just stood there and then ran away. That means Draco (and more importantly the audience) wasted away his life completing this completely pointless task for no reason. In the book, the Death Eaters engaged the students and the Order of the Phoenix in battle below, as Draco confronted Dumbledore. Putting the pressure on the entire situation and causing some real damage.

Either write it out and write out the entire subplot of Draco mending the cabinet, or find another way to work around it. But don't be this lazy. Steve Kloves wrote this script and this is Screenwriting 101 stuff. You don't waste anyone's time by having a character who tries for an entire movie to accomplish a goal, only to have him succeed, but have the result be completely arbitrary. That's just lazy writing. Bring back the guy who wrote Order of the Phoenix - THAT screenplay was absolutely commendable for trimming the fat and making sure that everything that happened happened for a reason and played directly into the story at hand.

Speaking of Order of the Phoenix - nothing can compare to Harry's arc in that film. Going from conflicted and tortured boy to hardened and resolved soldier was delightful to watch. In this film, he already is the hardened and resolved soldier, and pretty much remains that way throughout. I understand that to some extent this was true of the book as well, but you at least got the sense that Harry changed as a person as he got to know Voldemort better through the Pensieve sequences. That is not true of the movie, and his character remains very one dimensional (on the screenplay side of things- as I said Dan Radcliffe manages to still make the role enjoyable on his own) throughout the entire film.

Perhaps I'm overreacting. Honestly - if that glaring plot hole of Draco's mission being pointless wasn't in the film, I might go easier on it. But it took me out of the movie SO much that it couldn't possibly recover.

That to some degree spoiled the ending for me (don't even get me started on the fact that Snape being the Half Blood Prince was not at all relevant to the story), and that's the greatest travesty of the movie. I was expecting to cry at the end of the movie - and I still felt emotional. But I couldn't get over the stupidity of that plot hole. I could understand the omission of the funeral of Dumbledore, and the omission of Fawkes' lament (though I really wanted to see them since the first time I read the book) - but the entire ending just felt a bit like the rest of the movie - like it was going through the motions.

It's a testament to everyone but Steve Kloves that I enjoyed this movie. David Yates directed the movie phenomenally well, and the actors all turned in stellar performances (any time Harry/Ginny/Ron/Hermione were on screen, I was completely entertained).

An example of a movie that had problems in the script phase that no one took the time to iron out because no one really thought to step back and think twice about important decisions made from the very beginning. Still, as I said, it manages to rank in the upper half of the movie series, with the first two films and goblet of fire bringing up the rear.

Bah I've written way too much. Oh well. :p

P.S. - I fully intend on giving this a rewatch over the weekend, just to let it sink in a bit more and to let me have time to think things over and see it with a fresh pair of eyes. Hopefully it will improve on a second viewing. I really really hope it does. I wanted to love it so much! razz
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 3:55am

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Pooky

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Heh, Atom, I love how every single movie you see is a masterpiece. Seriously, good for you though.

But, yeah, I agree that it's definitely the best in the series, and that nearly everything was perfect (except minor details like the Weasley's house blowing up just because the script was lacking a good action scene).

Looking forward to the next two if they're as good as this!
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 6:09am

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Thrawn

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Okay, so I decided to skip out on Friday and see it today (thanks to Atom's little review) and I've found only one word that can describe this film: Brilliant. Of course, by just using that word, I quote half of Ron's lines.. wink

But really, I absolutely loved the film. I haven't read the Half-Blood prince yet (though I've read all of the others proceeding it) so I can't really give a true, in-depth, review of the movie and it's flaws, though I'm sure it's had it's share. I went into the theater expecting the PG rating to limit it in a few ways, but I was very wrong. In fact, if I hadn't have known any better, I would have guessed it for PG-13.

Some of the best parts were the awkward "romance" moments. They completely captured the mood, in my opinion. And the timing was fantastic in all of their jokes. Though I (hardly) noticed the plot hole, as Evman has pointed out over his very lengthy post, it really didn't bother me.

Though he fits the part quite well, I've never really been too sure of Daniel Radcliffe's acting ability. Granted, he looks exactly like a "harry potter" but something about his acting throws me off a bit. However, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson are both fantastic at acting (especially the latter) and I can definintly see them having a succesful career as actors/actresses. As for danny-boy... well, he may be better off continueing to pose nude wink (I kid, I kid)

Anyways, loved the film, just as I did all the others.

9.5/10 (because nothing is perfect)
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 6:33am

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Aculag

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I plan on seeing this very soon. Maybe tomorrow.

Of course, it's a film that Atom gave 10/10, so I'm bound to find some issues with it somewhere. wink Just kidding, I love Harry Potter films, and everything I've heard about this one makes it sound fantastic. Plus, it has one of the most dramatic scenes in the entire series, and I would see it just for that one scene.
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 7:30pm

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DVStudio

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I just got back a little while ago from seeing it. SPOILERS!warning. I know it was posted earlier, but if you missed it, SPOILERS!

Bloody Hell.

That was great. Usually I don't get that excited about a Harry Potter movie, but this one was fantastic. Easily the best one yet. By a lot, in my opinion.

I loved the effects. They were great. The other movies, they were okay, could have been better, could have been worse. But this one they were great. Really. The grading was great. A little grim in some places, but this was the most grim and dark book so far. A little grity, but great. The twisting bridge was phenomnial. I wish I could do that smile And the death-eaters flying was spectacular. Let's not forget the fire in the cave too. That was sick.

The cast was perfect. The characters played their parts brilliantly and all were played exactly how they should have been. Great job! They made it seem less scripted (though of course it was) and more life-like. I kike how they didn't cut the instances where the three muskateers wink (Harry, Ron, Hermione) started to laugh. Not usre if this was completely scripted, but perhaps this was an added-on-the-spot kind of thing. I don;t know but that made it more realistic.

I liked the ending. The part in the cave when they were looking for the horocruxes was terrific. Like the editing and effects here. The lighting was perfect. The wand light (Lumos) and all was really cool. The dead people, I guess, were done really well as well. The shot from the outside of the cave with the waves was really well done. Reminded me of the cave rescue in The Guardian. Realt cool. When Harry and Dumbeldore got back and he was killed, that was done well too. Liked the way Snape came and got the show on the road. Of course, we all know it was all according to Dumbledore's plan.

The only thing I would have liked was if there had been just a little more from the book. But that's alright. Like the fighting in the castle that was left out and all. Oh well. I would have been there for 6 hours if they put it all in! And much of what they cut wasn't needed. At all. They cut a lot of the useless dialogue and all out, becuase they could show what happened- obviously it was Voldemort and the death eaters at the begining. Why talk about it too? Always loved the newspapers too smile

Overall, I'd give it a 12/10. Yes, 12. It was that good. A bit dark and a little grim, but humor, friendship, romance and all nmake their way into the film. Easily the best movie yet. At 02:40:00 it is the perfect length. Just get extra popcorn. Oh yeah. Go see it. Now. Atom, it was your uncommonly good review that prompted me to want to see this. Man am I glad I did. Thanks. The other good reviews were all correct. This was great! This coming from a guy who isn't, no wsn't a big HP fan.

Man, I wish there was a way to get involved in the next movie. Hell, I'll be the water boy, or bring coffee and doughnuts. Anything. Can't wait for the next one. But 2 parts.... really?

Bloody Hell.

That was brilliant.
hugegrin

DV
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 8:50pm

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Atom

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Forgive me for finding 3 movies this year I gave a perfect score- two of which are in the high 90th-percentile on Rotten Tomatoes and are being widely lauded as excellent. wink

I'm sorry my history and opinion, and the fact that I see so many movies per month and try and accurately review and post-up my thoughts on here for others to benefit from, actually influences people to go see the movies. It's a gift and a curse, I suppose.
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 9:07pm

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DVStudio

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Atom wrote:

Forgive me for finding 3 movies this year I gave a perfect score- two of which are in the high 90th-percentile on Rotten Tomatoes and are being widely lauded as excellent. wink

I'm sorry my history and opinion, and the fact that I see so many movies per month and try and accurately review and post-up my thoughts on here for others to benefit from, actually influences people to go see the movies. It's a gift and a curse, I suppose.
Well, see, the reason I went to the Harry Potter movie was because of your review. This is because you said it was such a great movie (and rightfully so) and generally Atom gives many movies bad reviews.

Atom- honestly, if you had said it was a terrible movie, some people probably would have given you crap over that too smile Guess it is a no win situation wink
Posted: Thu, 16th Jul 2009, 9:34pm

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Atom

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Rating: -7

I think singling-out Kloves like that, Evman, is really scathing and assholish- and glaringly unfair. But then again, if you're to expect positive reviews from me, I guess I'm to expect nothing but assholishness from you...

Whilst there may have been plot holes, for someone like myself- who hadn't read the 6th book (only one I haven't read) the movie still played-out in a very intriguing and understandable way, and it's a testament to Kloves that such an lengthy book could be successfully condensed the way it, well, obviously was and still retain such a fair amount of cohesiveness in the plot and genuinely excellent bits of dialogue and prose.

You may be correct about what has been omitted from book to movie, but as a film it is missing nothing.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 1:21am

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Aculag

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Rating: +3

Atom wrote:

I think singling-out Kloves like that, Evman, is really scathing and assholish- and glaringly unfair. But then again, if you're to expect positive reviews from me, I guess I'm to expect nothing but assholishness from you...
neutral what. He's stating his opinion, not assaulting someone. Steve Kloves will never read those specific comments, but chances are, if Evman feels that way, he's not alone in that opinion.

Dude, you can't call Evman an asshole for having a divergent opinion about that aspect of the film. It's his opinion, and he's entitled to it. Stop acting like what you say needs to be gospel, and anyone who disagrees (whether it's a harsh disagreement or not) is an "asshole." This makes you the asshole, not him. It's one thing to defend your position, but something entirely different to be so abrasive about it. Stop being so combative. It isn't helping anyone.

Heh, still haven't seen this. Maybe I should stop poking my nose in this thread until I do. wink
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 1:55am

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Evman

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Atom wrote:



You may be correct about what has been omitted from book to movie, but as a film it is missing nothing.
The book is missing nothing. The movie is missing common sense in this giant plot hole. It is a problem entirely confined to the movie and a basic leap of common sense. Why would he spend a year getting them in if they aren't going to do anything?

Perhaps I am being too hard on Kloves. He has done a commendable job in the series and likely the decision to cut the Hogwarts fight was not his. Nor was it probably his decision to add a completely pointless attack sequence at the burrow midway through the film (honestly - NOTHING was gained from that scene). But still - there is a certain level of cohesiveness that I think this movie never really got down. It never decided what it's main point was and where it was going. Horcruxes were glossed over and so was the entire Half Blood Prince storyline.

Another character beat I missed from this movie: Harry having ANY reaction at all to Sirius' death in the last movie. Again, that's not a book thing that was omitted, merely a common sense, storytelling thing.

I think this one sentence from a review I just read kinda highlights my opinion very well:

What is surprising — and I say this as someone who loves the books and has loved the movies up to this point — is how sluggish the new picture is. It gets underway with a limp scene set in a train-station café — a trivial flirtation between Harry, now 16, and an admiring waitress — and proceeds in surges and sags for the next two and a half hours. There are some marvelous scenes, beautiful images, wonderful moments — it isn't a "bad" movie by any reckoning. But it isn't up to the sweeping dynamic level of some of the pictures that preceded it.
It's not as perfect as Prisoner of Azkaban and Order of the Phoenix were to me. I rewatched them just a day before I saw Half Blood Prince, and I was able to easily see that the first two were superior. I suggest everyone let the excitement of seeing the new film die down, and then rewatch those two films. You will remember just how good (especially PoA) they are.

I don't know - I still think I really need to re-watch this film. I saw it at a midnight show, was tired, and was angry because I had to get up twice to go complain to the theater employees - because the picture was out of focus, and because they didn't dim the house lights once the movie started. All that got things off to a bad start and I never really shook my cranky mood. It apparently made me less willing to overlook flaws than I usually am. Or the movie just didn't really do it for me in general.

I hope to see it again maybe this weekend, and we'll see how my opinion changes (if at all).


EDIT: Another thing that they completely failed to touch on in this movie (hopefully the DH films will cover this) is the lack of acknowledgement that now that Dumbledore is gone, Harry is more vulnerable than ever. Dumbledore was the one wizard Voldemort feared, and I just didn't see Harry being "alone" so to speak. Hell, even while he was standing of Dumbledore's dead body, Ginny ran over and started hugging him. As sweet as this was (and actually one of my favorite bits in their story), I really wish it wasn't there. You just don't feel Dumbledore's death and Harry's isolation as well as it needed to be felt.

Last edited Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 3:20am; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 2:35am

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jawajohnny

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Rating: +1

Atom wrote:

You may be correct about what has been omitted from book to movie, but as a film it is missing nothing.
Exactly. Sure, a lot of subplots and characters from the books have been cut out... but the main story and themes are all there. Really, the books and movies are two different entities. The books are really fun reads, because you can just immerse yourself in the world, reading chapter after chapter of potions class, Quidditch practice, etc. while the major plot unfolds. The movies omit a lot of "unnecessary" stuff in order to tell a tighter, simpler, yet just as emotionally powerful story. The movies have done a pretty good job of getting the overall plot right, and the characters and themes are exceptional.

Evman:

I can see what you're saying. A lot of the stuff from the book was included without proper setup. However, I think that's the fault of the previous movies for not setting them up right. For example, the whole Moony, Wormtail, Padfoot, and Prongs thing. Cuaron didn't explain who they were in Prisoner of Azkaban, but subsequent films, out of the blue, just start calling Peter Pettigrew "Wormtail", Sirius "Padfoot", and Lupin "Moony". I'm not so sure these films should have taken time to set up or "fix" things that previous films failed to do.

The Weasley joke shop was somewhat random, but I do think it was necessary. It shows that although everyone is in grave danger, people are still getting to have some fun. Fred and George have a sort of way to keep everyone in good spirits. Good little moment to have in the movie. And of course, it establishes the concept of love potions.

The Harry/Ginny relationship was not as strong as it was in the book... but in the book, most of the buildup is in Harry's thoughts. In a movie, we don't get to see Harry's thoughts. Harry looking at Ginny at the beginning of the film is really the only way to do it. It does build up throughout the film... we just see it instead of reading Harry's thoughts. The buildup in the book and movie is great, but I actually found the payoff in both the book and the film to be a bit weak. After they kiss in the book, we really don't hear much about their relationship after that. We just have the knowledge that they're together. In the film, the kiss is short and sweet, but we don't really see them together much after that (I don't think). The thing that makes their relationship not entirely random is the little moment in the second film, where Ginny completely freaks out when she sees Harry. It perfectly establishes that Ginny has a crush on Harry... a crush that never went away.

The Ron/Hermione relationship has been very well-developed so far. It has been built up from early on in the series... hints of it appear earlier than they did in the books. Hermione's sudden reaction makes total sense. We've known since as early as movie 4 that Hermione has feelings towards him, so for her to see him suddenly snogging another girl would be an appropriately jarring experience. All her reaction stuff is portrayed quite brilliantly. My only concern regarding the inevitable Ron/Hermione relationship is: How will the kiss play out? In the book, it is a really nice moment. There's the whole subplot in the books about how Ron makes fun of Hermione's compassion for house-elfs, and then right before the final battle, Ron suddenly says, "Hey, we should warn the house-elfs to get out". It's the perfect reason for Hermione to embrace him, but it probably won't happen in the film. I just hope it won't be a generic, cliched, moment in the film.

As a whole, I think Half-Blood Prince is definitely the hardest movie to adapt. There are so many moments in the written form (like Dumbledore's funeral, that just wouldn't work onscreen (although I've heard they're trying to re-work the scene and have it open the seventh film). Another perfect example of this would be the whole "Half-Blood Prince" concept. You can't spend a lot of time trying to figure out who it is... it's just boring. I actually think that was a lame subplot in the book to begin with... it's never really important... it never goes anywhere. So I'm glad they hardly focused on that beyond showing that he has helped Harry, and hurt Harry... as well as appropriately identifying Snape as the (other) title character.

EDIT: A possible explanation for your plot hole, Evman: The plan was for Malfoy to get Death Eaters into Hogwarts to assist him with his task of killing Dumbledore. In fact, we see them take out a couple of Aurors (if I'm not mistaken). And then, they would be there in case Malfoy fails (as Voldemort expects him to). Remember, Snape was never exactly part of the Death Eater's plan. His choice to act benefited more than one person. The other Death Eaters were there to fight off some Auror's (which they did), and to assist Malfoy in his task.

Edit 2: Awesome news: looks like John Williams is returning for Deathly Hallows!
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 4:29am

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Pooky

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That's the touchy thing with translating these books to the screen: they're far too long for a normal running time, but at the same time, every element adds to the atmosphere and, in a way, is part of why the series is so loved by so many people. So when you cut something out, although us people-that-don't-dislike-reading types can't help but notice and feel somewhat sad that millions of people will see the story this way.

It's like trying to make The Lord of the Rings in one movie. You're going to end up with a bare-bones story and end up skipping all the details that make the series so unique. When I think of the Harry Potter books, I feel nostalgic, not only because I've grown up with them, but because the world is so well built.

In this movie, you only scratch the surface of the awesomeness, which is frustrating. However, it's BY FAR the closest the movies have ever come to being like the books. Dumbledore was finally the right mix of childlike and wise, for example, although it's a bit ironic it had to be in this one.

Anyway, while it was great, the simple fact that I know exactly how it could have been better makes it so that I can't really fathom giving this anything over a 8/10, or something.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 4:52am

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Atom

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But I think not so, in regards to the LOTR reference. Like I said, I was especially baffled and impressed by the script because of the sheer condensing and cutting I'd imagine they had to have done- and, to me, the movie still remains solid if not better than that, and cohesively works.

And, for me, it's not even a matter of reading the book to see the effectiveness of that- you can look at the number of inches in the binding against the number of minutes in the movie and know some serious pacing and working had to be done fairly well to make a (relatively) so enjoyable and successful movie.

And what am I saying, Kloves has always impressed me- even with the concessions and additions he makes. He's adapted the whole series, after all. I think, this in-mind, people can worry less about all those extra elements and how they'll relate when they need to in the next set of films. I remember watching Order of the Phoenix and thinking 'oh, no! they left so much out, it won't make sense in the upcoming movies when they have to explain them!'. Like the Ginny/Harry relationship.

But then, and this is perhaps the reason I enjoyed the fifth movie as Evman did even more, I realized that Kloves had been adapting it all and would continue to, so it's as if instead of a bunch of writers go back each movie and change it into an incongruous mess- you've got this one guy knowing where his writing (essentially an abridged draft of the book) is going and how to get there. His concession, additions, changes- like JK's work they're all connected just the same.

And when I thought about it like that I worried a lot less and enjoyed myself much more. And to great effect, too. The Ginny/Harry relationship, which I was worried was cut-out of Order of the Phoenix, was there and nicely paced and presented- and didn't need to be even hinted at in the 5th because Kloves had a way for it to develop entirely in the 6th. And I appreciate that and things like it, and that's the reason above all I commend the writing.

And, really, anyone who knows me and the movies I make- and my reaction to the Writer's Strike even- should know I'm not usually the proprietor of 'writing is the best/most important part!'. Really, quite the contrary.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 5:06am

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Bryce007

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Opinions on non-life threatening issues cannot be wrong. They're just the trivial output of a human brain.

There we go. Let's move on.


EDIT:

Also forgot to mention that here in Chicago they've got an entire Exhibition set up for Harry Potter if you're into that sort of thing. Pretty damn cool regardless of how uninteresting I find HP:

http://www.msichicago.org/whats-here/exhibits/harry-potter/

Last edited Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 8:08am; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 7:41am

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Thrawn

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...and I found a $5 dollar bill...

But anyways, has anyone checked out the "Behind the Magic" of Harry Potter 6 on youtube? While it's not that great of a behind the scenes on the filmmaking side of things, it does take a cool look at the sets and such, which is pretty neat. Check it out if you have a spare 30 minutes or so,
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 3:59pm

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Simon K Jones

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Rating: +1

Atom: Get your act together, stop behaving like a crazy man and stop nuking every topic in which someone dares to express a differing opinion to your own. I don't know if you've got deeper issues away from FXhome.com that are influencing your behaviour, and don't want to know, but try to restrain yourself and keep it off the forums. You can't just go around calling people 'assholes'. I've got better things to be doing with my time than tidying up every topic after you.

If you want to discuss the matter further, PM me. Subsequent posts on the matter in this topic will be removed.

Back to the matter at hand:


Just got back from Harry Potter and the Vague Plot Point.

Really, really enjoyed it! The first two thirds were by far my favourite Harry Potter stuff so far. Charming, very funny and witty, exciting, tense, foreboding, atmospheric...hugely stylish throughout and by far the best produced Potter film so far.

Unfortunately the last third really flopped for me, from the moment the whore-crud (sic) plot was introduced. It felt, alas, like every Potter film to date: two thirds of fun, rollicking adventure and rite-of-passage stuff, followed by the filmmakers suddenly going "ah, crap! We've got that whole epic Voldemort plot to do!", resulting in the introduction of a lame, unprecedented plot device at the last minute, cramming in a load of slightly jumbled exposition, and then rushing to a climax that doesn't really make much sense. As with the previous films, I had to have someone that's read the books explain away all of the film's plot holes.

Also: The film being called The Half Blood Prince was essentially pointless. The spell book and Snape revelation didn't really affect anything. And the giant spider death scene was just....weird.

All the character stuff was awesome, and the kid actors are genuinely very, very watchable these days. It's the over-arching Voldemort plotline that doesn't work for me. In fact, I'd rather it wasn't there at all. If it was just "kids growing up at wizard school!" every film I'd be perfectly content.

Still, thoroughly enjoyed it. Infinitely classier film than the summer's other blockbuster, Transformers 2, in every single way. Shame about the limp ending.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 4:24pm

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Pooky

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Tarn - yeah, see, that's what I meant. In the book, Harry goes to see Hagrid because he got a letter from him saying Aragog the spider had just died and he was going to bury him. Prof. Slughorn only comes with him because he wants to take some of the venom (and does so sneakily without telling Hagrid). Also, the Half-Blood Prince book is way, way more present and helps Harry through a lot more stuff, and he tries to research it, and so on. Finally, there are about three times more pensieve flashbacks, and Dumbledore is absent more often, which makes the Horcrux plot point actually pretty huge when it is finally revealed.

Also, the ending in the book wasn't rushed: in the book, even Dumbledore isn't allowed to apparate, so they use broomsticks to go to the village nearby and apparate there, which means that when they come back, and they're approaching Hogwarts, they see the dark mark (skull cloud thing) in the sky and get worried, which leads to Dumbledore getting killed, and then a large battle. When Harry runs after Snape, it's a lot more fleshed out, too, and the ending of the book is actually Dumbledore's funeral.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 4:29pm

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Simon K Jones

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Actually, could one of the book readers explain one remaining plot hole that I don't get:

The big mystery is the censored memory of Riddle talking to Jim Broadbent. Harry's main quest in the film is to find out what that memory was actually all about, because it's ABSOLUTELY VITAL that Dumbledore knows.

So he finally figures it out, and goes to tell Dumbledore. At which point Dumbledore is horrified that it's a whore-crud, but then basically says "yeah, you know I've been disappearing a lot this year? I've been going around collecting/hunting for the whore-crud objects."

Eh?

So Dumbledore DID know what it was from the start? Or he didn't? If he didn't, how come he was looking for stuff? If he did, why all the faffing with Harry to find out about the memory?

I'm confused.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 4:31pm

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Joshua Davies

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I really enjoyed this film.

Having said that, The Half Blood Prince didn't hold together as well as the last couple of films for me. Every Harry Potter film (book?) seems to include a random plot point which we're meant to care about but never do. At the end of the film some boring bit of dialogue is normally used to tell us why we should have cared - they didn't even both with this.

That being said, I do enjoy the other elements of all the films, and I think the acting by the younger cast was much stronger than all the previous films.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 4:36pm

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Pooky

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Tarn wrote:

Actually, could one of the book readers explain one remaining plot hole that I don't get:

The big mystery is the censored memory of Riddle talking to Jim Broadbent. Harry's main quest in the film is to find out what that memory was actually all about, because it's ABSOLUTELY VITAL that Dumbledore knows.

So he finally figures it out, and goes to tell Dumbledore. At which point Dumbledore is horrified that it's a whore-crud, but then basically says "yeah, you know I've been disappearing a lot this year? I've been going around collecting/hunting for the whore-crud objects."

Eh?

So Dumbledore DID know what it was from the start? Or he didn't? If he didn't, how come he was looking for stuff? If he did, why all the faffing with Harry to find out about the memory?

I'm confused.
As I remember it, Dumbledore DID know about the existence of Horcruxes, but he didn't know how many there were. The memory also offers hints as to what the Horcruxes are.

Schwar - Nah, that's only in the movies, and is part of why anyone who's read the books likes the movies a lot less.
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 7:11pm

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StupidLikeAFox

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Pooky wrote:

Tarn wrote:

Actually, could one of the book readers explain one remaining plot hole that I don't get:

The big mystery is the censored memory of Riddle talking to Jim Broadbent. Harry's main quest in the film is to find out what that memory was actually all about, because it's ABSOLUTELY VITAL that Dumbledore knows.

So he finally figures it out, and goes to tell Dumbledore. At which point Dumbledore is horrified that it's a whore-crud, but then basically says "yeah, you know I've been disappearing a lot this year? I've been going around collecting/hunting for the whore-crud objects."

Eh?

So Dumbledore DID know what it was from the start? Or he didn't? If he didn't, how come he was looking for stuff? If he did, why all the faffing with Harry to find out about the memory?

I'm confused.
As I remember it, Dumbledore DID know about the existence of Horcruxes, but he didn't know how many there were. The memory also offers hints as to what the Horcruxes are.

Schwar - Nah, that's only in the movies, and is part of why anyone who's read the books likes the movies a lot less.
As I remember Dumbledore DID know about the existence of the Horcruxes and he DID think there were seven horucruxes (including voldermort) but this memory was crucial to confirm that he was correct. wink
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 8:59pm

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jawajohnny

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To Tarn, and any other non-readers:

Dumbledore has always suspected that Voldemort made Horcruxes... because after he tried to kill Harry before the series starts, he didn't entirely die. He was alive in some crude form, and was attempting to come back. In the second film, Dumbledore instantly recognizes that Tom Riddle's diary was a horcrux, but he doesn't tell Harry anything. In fact, he withholds everything from Harry until the fifth film, where he tells Harry about the prophecy (that one of them will kill each other in the end).

Throughout the sixth book/movie, Dumbledore is trying to find out everything he can about Voldemort's past, hoping it will help him find out the key to defeating him (destroying the horcruxes will ensure that Voldemort will be mortal, and that someone can kill him). In the books, this plot is much more developed, with Dumbledore showing Harry a lot more memories that give clues to what each Horcrux is. Then, Slughorn's correct memory confirms that Voldemort has indeed split his soul into seven total pieces, made six horcruxes, and hidden them in separate locations.

So in the movie, Dumbledore explains to Harry what horcruxes are, and then tells Harry that he has already destroyed a ring, and that Harry destroyed the diary in the second film. Then, he takes Harry to the cave, where he hopes to find another horcrux (the locket). After Dumbledore is killed, Harry opens the locket, and realizes that someone with the initials R.A.B found and took the real locket horcrux. This is a mystery that carries into book/movie 7.

This leaves four horcruxes for Harry/Ron/Hermione to hunt down in the last two films. In the books, Dumbledore had figured out what each remaining horcrux is, but this info is omitted from the film. I'm assuming this info will be included along with the rest of the "clues" Dumbledore leaves to the trio in his will at the beginning of the seventh film.

I got the sense that the filmmakers didn't want to overwhelm audiences with too much info on Voldemort's horcruxes in this film. After all, the final two movies will be all about the trio looking for the horcruxes. There will be ample time to explain them in further depth at the beginning of the next film. In this film, we learn about the existence of the horcruxes, and then the next two films will be all about destroying them. So hopefully that explains some things. smile

I'm curious to hear what some of you non-readers think about "Snape kills Dumbledore". Was Snape developed enough in the previous films to justify his major role at the end, etc.? Did you realize that the film was building up to that specific event? Did you catch any hints about this event, or for that matter, anything else that might happen in Deathly Hallows?
Posted: Fri, 17th Jul 2009, 11:20pm

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Pooky

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Rating: +1

Another thing to mention is that in the book, there is a lot of emphasis on Dumbledore trusting Snape, and you get to see Snape's defense against the dark arts class, among other things. Also, throughout all of the books, you had characters mentioning how Dumbledore was the only high-up sane Wizard, and him being the only hope, and his feuds with the Ministry of Magic, and so on. It's one of the overarching themes, and in the end it makes Snape killing Dumbledore far more surprising and earth-shattering than in the movie.

To me it felt like everyone in the theater kind of went "Oh no! They killed a major character!" instead of "DEAR GOD, NOT DUMBLEDORE!".

Last edited Sat, 18th Jul 2009, 4:51pm; edited 3 times in total.

Posted: Sat, 18th Jul 2009, 1:27am

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DVStudio

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SPOILERS BOOK 7- Here on in

SPOILERS BOOK 7- Here on in



As far as Snape killing Dumbledore, we all know that was Dumbledore's plan right? So he can help Harry in the next book/ movies. Snape isn't actually working for Voldemort. He is like, well, I guess a triple agent.

You can kind of tell that this was the case, because when Harry was in the tower with Dumbledore and the death easters were surrounding Dumbledore, you know, the part where Malfoy was supposed to kill him, Snape puts his finger up to his lips to make Harry not say anything and then Snape heads up above. Snape hates Harry, and if he was truly evil he would have turned him over, or let him yell out as to get himself killed. Snape didn;t do this. He followed Dumbledore's orders and protected Harry. Harry of course, doesn't see it this way after Snape kills Dumbledore, which leads me to my next point.

Also, after they kill Dumbledore, they run and light Hagrid's hut on fire. Here, Harry chases Snape and they duel a little. Snape doesn't let Belatrix touch Harry- saying "he belongs to the Dark Lord" but he just leaves him there, even though Harry is weak, defenseless, and vulnerable. Snape obviously wouldn't have done this if he was truly doing Voldemort's bidding.

Snape is a rather difficult character to piece together. Though done on purpose, to lead up to this event, he appears to be a shady character. though once a death eater, he is beleived to be converted, and he is clearly trusted by Albus and therefore many of those who trust Dumbledore- Lupin notabley. Though he and Harry have always clashed, due to his relationship with Harry's Father (see 3rd and 5th book), and they are both always at odds.

At other points, such as with Karkaroff in the 4th movie, he appears to be a double agent working for Voldemort. Remember book 1? When Snape was protecting the Sorcer's Stone from Quirrel (Voldemort). He appeared to be the one trying to steal it, remember? The bitten leg? Then in this movie. At the beginning he appears to be sincere- taking the Unbreakable Vow (which Ron defines cleverly as a vow that can't be broken) and prominsing to help Malfoy with his task- which is also the task given to Snape by Dumbledore (to kill him) Clearly as the movie progresses, you can see them working together (that is, Malfoy and Snape), again Snape plays a convincing role to both sides, and Harry is again suspicious. And then we come back to the murder of Albus Dumbledore.

So that's Snape. I'm sure I left some out, but you get the general idea.

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Posted: Sat, 18th Jul 2009, 4:55am

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Pooky

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Sorry, who are you replying to? I don't think anyone was misunderstanding anything regarding Snape, and you giving away all the spoilers to the seventh book serves no purpose whatsoever... ?
Posted: Sat, 18th Jul 2009, 11:25am

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DVStudio

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Sorry. Just saw that I misread JawaJohnny's post about understanding Snape killing Dumbledore. My apologies.
Posted: Mon, 20th Jul 2009, 1:59am

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jawajohnny

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Some more news on Deathly Hallows I and II...

Bill Nighy has been cast as Minister of Magic, Rufus Scrimgeour. Has anyone not been cast perfectly? smile
Posted: Mon, 20th Jul 2009, 4:08am

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Evman

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So I saw it again tonight, and once my initial disappointment had washed away, I was able to enjoy it a lot more. I still think that it's kind of meandering, full of plot holes, lacked focus, and if I hadn't read the book I would be completely lost, but I accepted it for what it was. As a huge Potter fan, I was ultimately satisfied. And Dumbledore's death affected me the way it should have this time.

I still don't think it's quite up to snuff with the 3rd or 5th movie, nor is it better than the book (but really, none of the movies have ever been better than their book counterparts), which IMO, was possibly the best book in the series. But when it was working well, DAMN was it working well.

I'm in the process of re-reading Deathly Hallows now - and I'm actually getting more and more excited about the prospect of two films being made. They can finally play catch up on all the things they've neglected so far, and treat the last book with the amount of detail and care it deserves. I just hope that the second part doesn't suffer because of rushed time in production and post production (I'm looking in the direction of other "second of two movies made back to back" like Matrix Revolutions, Back to the Future Part III, and Pirates of the Caribbean 3).

P.S. - Bill Nighy as Scrimgeour is indeed perfect for that role.
Posted: Mon, 20th Jul 2009, 8:17am

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Simon K Jones

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Problem is, they've only got 2 films left. Thankfully they've now cast Nighy, and they did Broadbent in the last one, but there's a few Essential British Actors they still need to include:

Patrick Stewart
Simon Pegg
Helen Mirren
Judi Dench
Ian McKellan

If they don't somehow shoehorn these actors into the final couple of films then, quite frankly, the Harry Potter series will have failed. wink

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Posted: Mon, 20th Jul 2009, 8:19am

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ben3308

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Dame Dench and Sir McKellan, but I don't think Stewart and Mirren are as essential. Pegg certainly isn't.
Posted: Mon, 20th Jul 2009, 8:24am

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Simon K Jones

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Ah, I forgot Brian Blessed.
Posted: Wed, 22nd Jul 2009, 3:49pm

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jawajohnny

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Ah, too bad there aren't really any more major roles to fill. I would have liked to see Patrick Stewart as Dumbledore's brother. Not sure where the rest of them would fit now...
Posted: Wed, 22nd Jul 2009, 4:16pm

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Evman

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Problem is, from your list Tarn, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellan, and Judi Dench are already too recognizable in pop culture as specific characters (Picard/Prof X, Gandalf/Magneto, M), so shoehorning them into the movies would seem unnatural and confuse the dumb American audience who only knows them in those roles... razz New roles they would potentially have to fill depending on how strict they are with their interpretation: Aberforth Dumbledore and Xenophelias Lovegood. (I'm rereading the 7th book right now - it's a lot better than I remembered it being.)

Last edited Wed, 22nd Jul 2009, 6:22pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Wed, 22nd Jul 2009, 6:01pm

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PSFreak

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They focused more on the budding romances between the kids than they did the history of Lord Voldemort. In the book, I couldn't wait to find out who was the half-blood prince. In the movie, you couldn't care less, and when it was finally revealed, it was no big deal. The whole movie felt more like a romantic comedy to me unsure
Posted: Wed, 22nd Jul 2009, 9:10pm

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Atom

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Ian McKellan, despite- or perhaps because because of- his being Gandalf, I would love to see as Dumbledore's brother.

But, alas, it'll never happen. Someone like, say, Liam Neeson I see as being a much more viable and likely casting choice- and in fact I think he'd really fit well into the series as another excellent UK actor.
Posted: Thu, 23rd Jul 2009, 3:52am

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Aculag

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Finally went to see this tonight. I think all of my views have been fairly well discussed in this thread, so I'll just say that I really loved it. Thought the cinematography was the best of the series. The romance subplots got a bit old, and seemed somewhat tacked on, even though it was a major theme. I did feel like it dragged on a bit in some places. They easily could have cut a lot of the more unnecessary scenes (The magic shop for instance,) but it flowed a lot better than say, Goblet of Fire. The climactic scene wasn't nearly as spectacular as I imagined it when I read the book, but such are the pitfalls of reading a book before seeing the movie. I think if I hadn't known what was coming, it would have been quite surprising.

Oh, and yeah, the Death Eaters were in Hogwarts for like 5 minutes, so it wasn't really helpful for Draco to go through all that work, but I have a feeling they're not done with that closet. I wouldn't be surprised they end up using it again in the next film.

Anyway, really good movie. Definitely not perfect, definitely not as good as the book, but it comes pretty close to being the best film of the series, for sure. Deathly Hallows 1 is going to kick ass.
Posted: Sun, 26th Jul 2009, 2:08am

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Limey

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I went to see this with my aunt and sister even though I don't know anything about the books or the other movies. I thought I wouldn't understand it or like it because of not watching the previous ones, but to my surprise I really liked this.
It was very interesting.
Posted: Sun, 26th Jul 2009, 5:30am

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Pooky

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I saw it too, it was good.
Posted: Sun, 26th Jul 2009, 10:05am

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Staff Only

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Tarn wrote:

Problem is, they've only got 2 films left. Thankfully they've now cast Nighy, and they did Broadbent in the last one, but there's a few Essential British Actors they still need to include:

Patrick Stewart
Simon Pegg
Helen Mirren
Judi Dench
Ian McKellan

Atom wrote:

Ian McKellan, despite- or perhaps because because of- his being Gandalf, I would love to see as Dumbledore's brother.

Evman wrote:

Problem is, from your list Tarn, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellan, and Judi Dench are already too recognizable...
Guys, it's Ian McKellen.

Also, speaking of British greats who haven't made the cut, you might want to check this out. It's an okay list if you're just looking at it for fun. I however think that most of the speculated roles for the 'rejects' are better suited for the ones who were cast. The actors I miss in the films:

Liam Neeson
(I would have liked him for Dumbledore)
Ewan McGregor (Imagine him as Bill)
Bill Nighy (He's in so that's okay, but he would have been an awesome Dumbledore. He has such a dry wit.)

Edit: Haven't had the energy to write a review yet, might write one tomorrow.

Last edited Thu, 6th Aug 2009, 11:22pm; edited 1 times in total.

Posted: Mon, 27th Jul 2009, 8:21am

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Simon K Jones

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Staff Only wrote:

Liam Neeson[/b] (I would have liked him for Dumbledore)
Argh! Much as I like Neeson, since he played Qui-Gon it seems that 90% of his roles are playing the same, identical 'wise mentor'. Seriously tedious.