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Green screening a Lightsaber!

Posted: Fri, 28th Aug 2009, 5:34am

Post 1 of 4

CryisisFX

Force: 10 | Joined: 25th Aug 2009 | Posts: 23

Member

I am doing a lightsaber battle and its 6 minutes long.... i was doing it you know frame by frame, and it takes for ever, im only at 30 seconds, so its awfuly boring!!!!! sad
i was wondering if you can use the green screens proprieties to make it faster, you know, take some green stuff and put it on your sabers blade?????
then when you work with the video, you change the green to a lightsaber texture or something like that????
Posted: Fri, 28th Aug 2009, 5:43am

Post 2 of 4

Garrison

Force: 5404 | Joined: 9th Mar 2006 | Posts: 1530

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Gold Member

You can do this. I remember someone did that (I believe it was Axeman) and it turned out okay, but the only way to get the best results is the way you are doing it. That's why rotoscoping takes a LONG time.
Posted: Fri, 28th Aug 2009, 6:03am

Post 3 of 4

CryisisFX

Force: 10 | Joined: 25th Aug 2009 | Posts: 23

Member

yeah, rotoscoping takes a lot of time....and even more time when you have multiple blades...sad
Posted: Fri, 28th Aug 2009, 8:23am

Post 4 of 4

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

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SuperUser

The trouble with trying to auto-track lightsaber blades is that they blur so much when they are moving fast. Which is pretty often during a good fight. You can use the Neon Object tool to track them for shots when they aren't moving so much. Try it on a scene where they are swinging around though, and you will quickly see the problems that arise with trying to do these effects in any way other than a frame-by-frame basis. The shot Garrison mentioned was the only shot in a two-minute fight scene I filmed that I could get good results with. But for that one shot, it did work well, and saved a lot of time.

Keep in mind too, that you can use the keyframing system to your advantage to greatly reduce the amount of work you have to do. Try repositioning the blade on only every second frame, and see if it tracks well enough. There will always be some shots that require every frame to be rotoscoped for best results, but sometimes you can get away with doing every second, or even every third frame.