You are viewing an archive of the old fxhome.com forums. The community has since moved to hitfilm.com.

How to grade a video from a sunny afternoon to a cloudy shot

Posted: Sun, 27th Sep 2009, 9:06pm

Post 1 of 6

FXhomer49575

Force: 400 | Joined: 25th Dec 2008 | Posts: 2

CompositeLab Pro User

Gold Member

I have seen many FXhome examples of grading a well lit outdoor daytime shot into a very dreary cloudy shot. I was wondering how this is done. I have tried to lower the brightness and saturation, increase the contrast, and increase the blue in the color balance to try to make a depressing cloudy effect, but it was still obviously a hot summer day.
Posted: Mon, 28th Sep 2009, 12:52am

Post 2 of 6

spydurhank

Force: 1956 | Joined: 24th Jun 2008 | Posts: 1357

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker Windows User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

This may involve some sky replacement and you can also use the color balance to darken a shot.
Posted: Mon, 28th Sep 2009, 12:55am

Post 3 of 6

TubeTape

Force: 9542 | Joined: 24th May 2007 | Posts: 169

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXpreset Maker Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Check out the link below. I was just playing around this weekend with some Halloween effects.

http://www.tubetape.net/servlet/the-template/graveyard/Page

I did replace the sky and color graded using temperature, brightness,contrast and a few other things. You just have to play around with it. You might also have to mask certain areas. If not the foreground will get to dark.
Posted: Mon, 28th Sep 2009, 8:13am

Post 4 of 6

Sollthar

Force: 13360 | Joined: 30th Oct 2001 | Posts: 6094

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 2 Pro User FXhome Movie Maker Windows User MacOS User

SuperUser

Generally, the unfortunate answer is: You don't.

The problem with sunlight is that it creates harsh shadows and a huge contrast. Contrast that just isn't there when you have misty weather (which is called "diffuse lighting" instead of "harsh direct light" of the sun). The two aren't just easily interchangeable with a filter.

Bright sunlight will always be bright sunlight and there's little you can do to change that appearance, even if you grade the hell out of it. It'll prove very very difficult.

If you're going for a misty look and can't afford to shoot with a fog machine etc, I'd suggest you plan well ahead and shoot scenes in as much a diffuse light as you can - for example cloudy weather, or simple early in the morning or late in the evening - and avoid direct sunlight like the plague.

And then, as has been suggested, you'll need to reduce the colors, replace the sky and ideally, add some in depth fogish overlay which will require a lot of masking.

Tubetapes example looks "cool", but far from "real" in any way. So it depends which you're going for.
Posted: Mon, 28th Sep 2009, 4:35pm

Post 5 of 6

TubeTape

Force: 9542 | Joined: 24th May 2007 | Posts: 169

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXpreset Maker Windows User MacOS User

Gold Member

Great response Sollthar. It's true, the best thing is to bring your greenscreen out on location, shoot in the lighting/environment you want & use live elements instead of cgi whenever possible. Our sample was quick & for fun smile Have fun!
Posted: Fri, 2nd Oct 2009, 2:39am

Post 6 of 6

FXhomer49575

Force: 400 | Joined: 25th Dec 2008 | Posts: 2

CompositeLab Pro User

Gold Member

Thanks guys. I guess I'll use my greenscreen for the shots. Oh well...