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Full HD (1920X1080) AVCHD format

Posted: Sun, 6th Dec 2009, 11:33am

Post 1 of 6

giannis1972

Force: 400 | Joined: 19th Aug 2009 | Posts: 4

CompositeLab Pro User

Gold Member

Hello,

I would like to ask if there is any thought of supporting AVCHD files import in CompositeLab Pro.
I work with Full HD (1920X1080) AVCHD format files and when I convert them into FULL HD Mov. files, I lose quality.
I am just making a suggestion, so we can import our Full HD camera files immediately in CompositeLab Pro, so we can have best quality and save time from converting.

Thank you.
Posted: Sun, 6th Dec 2009, 5:06pm

Post 2 of 6

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

SuperUser

If you are losing quality during conversion to .mov, then you should modify the conversion process you use. AVCHD is NOT an editing codec, and if you could import the files in that codec, it would cause a massive loss in quality by the end of the editing process. Despite the fact that the footage looks great after a single compression (by the camera), AVCHD compresses the footage so heavily that it would utterly destroy it by the time you were done editing.

What program are you using for the .mov conversion? What codec are you converting to?
Posted: Mon, 7th Dec 2009, 3:12pm

Post 3 of 6

giannis1972

Force: 400 | Joined: 19th Aug 2009 | Posts: 4

CompositeLab Pro User

Gold Member

I am using "ImTOO AVCHD Converter" now. It's good. Adobe Premier Pro CS4.2 has no problem accepting AVCHD files, so I can edit them there. When I say "Loss of quality" I meen that I am trying to do as less convertions as possible before the final export in Blu-Ray.
When I import the original camera file in a edetting software and then export the original file , I have the minimum loss of quality during the export. But I convert the original file, then edit the outcome of the convertion file and export it to the final file, I thinl I have bigger loss of quality.
The outcome converted file (mov. file) is OK when I use the "ImTOO AVCHD Converter". But I also have a second Full HD camera (Samsung) (Except my Sony), where I have to convert it's HDV files to AVCHD format, then to Mov. and then to the final export format.
Thanks for the information.

Listen to that.... I have a 3 minutes scene which is 987MB. My 2 hours movie must be more than 80GB. More loss of quality in zipping....
Posted: Mon, 7th Dec 2009, 3:14pm

Post 4 of 6

giannis1972

Force: 400 | Joined: 19th Aug 2009 | Posts: 4

CompositeLab Pro User

Gold Member

I use H.264 or Mpeg4 codec. I could use Mpeg2 but I don't know.... I will try all of them and see what happens..
Posted: Mon, 7th Dec 2009, 3:26pm

Post 5 of 6

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

SuperUser

I'm not sure if you are familiar with the difference between intermediate codecs (designed for editing) and delivery codecs (designed for final compression and distribution), but all of the codecs you mention are delivery codecs.

For final delivery, you can get away with a higher compression ratio, but its best to avoid delivery codecs during editing, as they discard too much information from the footage. The only way to get the files sizes that much smaller is to throw out some data. Of course, modern codecs are smart enough that usually they can throw out a bunch of data for compression once without the quality being impacted too heavily. But as soon as you start compressing multiple times with those kind of codecs, the quality can't hold up.

It is best to convert your footage to an intermediate codec immediately upon capture, as those codecs can prevent loss of quality during editing to a far greater extent. More info on codec selection is available in this article, which deals with the downside of intermediate codecs, namely, very large file sizes.

But in the most basic breakdown, the choice is either really big files or poor quality.
Posted: Tue, 8th Dec 2009, 2:22pm

Post 6 of 6

giannis1972

Force: 400 | Joined: 19th Aug 2009 | Posts: 4

CompositeLab Pro User

Gold Member

Ohh Thank you.! I didn't know anything about intermediate codecs.
My video camera records and compresses with H.264. I suppose I can convert my cammera file with an intermediate codec and then import it to Premier or Composite Lab Pro. Do some editting and then export it using a delivery codec.
I see... Thanks.