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Best Workflow?

Posted: Fri, 1st Jan 2010, 10:44pm

Post 1 of 5

jmparsons

Force: 0 | Joined: 18th Nov 2009 | Posts: 3

Member

I have been doing simple videos for training and promotion for about 18 months. I started with a Logitech webcam, room lighting and Windows Movie Maker. I have since acquired decent lights, a better camera and a good mic to record the audio into a separate application (Adobe Audition 1.5).

I have gotten a bit more ambitious, and will be shooting future videos against a green screen, using CompositeLab to drop in different backgrounds from still photos or artwork.

My typical video is 3-5 minutes in length, shot in HD and encoded to play on my website.

CompositeLab looks like it will do the trick nicely, at a surprisingly good price. I have been playing with the demo version. I also think I can get better results with a different editing program; I have been using PowerDirector recently and it seems to be a step up from WMM.

I realize that CompositeLab is not a substitute for a nonlinear editor, and that's fine; I am just looking at this point for a good way to handle the green screen compositing.

Should I complete the editing first (including audio and titles), then render and import to CompositLab to do the green sceen work, then render again to my final production using CompositeLab? Will I retain the quality of the original source? If this is not the best approach, could someone give me some guidance?

Thanks!
Joe Parsons
Posted: Sat, 2nd Jan 2010, 1:01am

Post 2 of 5

Fxhome Dude

Force: 996 | Joined: 1st Jun 2009 | Posts: 927

CompositeLab Pro User FXpreset Maker FXhome Movie Maker Windows User

Gold Member

In a word no. You will want to do your editing on composite lab first before exporting into powerdirector. I personally have used all three programs (WMM, Power director, CL) and you have one the best setups for power vs. ease of use.
Another method is too cut off the unwanted portions of your raw video in PD and then import into Cl, and then re import into PD for the final cut. The main advantage of this way is that you can retain the orginal sound of the clip, if you choose to.
Evalute those methods and see where that gets you.
Posted: Mon, 4th Jan 2010, 9:40am

Post 3 of 5

Simon K Jones

Force: 27955 | Joined: 1st Jan 2002 | Posts: 11683

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FXhome Team Member

It's almost always best to edit your project before adding effects/compositing. This means you won't waste time working on shots that might subsequently be cut out.

However, this absolutely does not include titles, subtitles or transitions. The shots you send over to CompositeLab need to be clean and high quality - apply the final touches after the effects are completed.

I'd also recommend taking a look at a 'proper' editing solution such as Sony Vegas or Adobe Premiere, where you'll find even more power than PowerDirector.
Posted: Mon, 4th Jan 2010, 3:18pm

Post 4 of 5

jmparsons

Force: 0 | Joined: 18th Nov 2009 | Posts: 3

Member

Tarn wrote:

It's almost always best to edit your project before adding effects/compositing. This means you won't waste time working on shots that might subsequently be cut out.

However, this absolutely does not include titles, subtitles or transitions. The shots you send over to CompositeLab need to be clean and high quality - apply the final touches after the effects are completed.

I'd also recommend taking a look at a 'proper' editing solution such as Sony Vegas or Adobe Premiere, where you'll find even more power than PowerDirector.
I am taking a hard look a Premiere. Even though my needs at this point are quite modest, I have been frustrated by the scanty documentation available with Power Director. CompositeLab, on the other hand, seem to be a very effective and versatile solution for what I need to do.

I am shooting in HD (1280 x 720). What is the best output format to retain maximum quality, since I am going to be adding effects and re-importing into the editor?

Thanks for the response.

Joe Parsons
Posted: Mon, 4th Jan 2010, 3:25pm

Post 5 of 5

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

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SuperUser

Best quality is to use uncompressed, but the files will be enormous, so make sure you have lots of drive space. Otherwise, you'll want to use an intermediate codec of some sort, like HDV or Quicktime Animation.