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making an invisible person

Posted: Sun, 14th Feb 2010, 7:14am

Post 1 of 5

FXhomer40781

Force: 1000 | Joined: 25th May 2007 | Posts: 32

VisionLab User

Gold Member

I was wondering what I can do to make someone invisible in Visionlab studio? I'm looking to do something along the lines as what they did in Forrest Gump (making Gary Sinese) look legless. Is this possible to do in Visionlab? Would I have to buy some kind of green/blue suit?
Posted: Sun, 14th Feb 2010, 9:00am

Post 2 of 5

spydurhank

Force: 1956 | Joined: 24th Jun 2008 | Posts: 1357

VisionLab User VideoWrap User FXpreset Maker Windows User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

Yeah you can do it in Visionlab. The more frequently your injured actor moves his severed limbs... the more difficult it will become to composite.

You'll want to prepare a storyboard for all the effects shots and then shoot with a stationary camera on a tripod.

1st you need a background plate without your injured actor in it. You can have other actors "doctors" if you really need them in this background layer.

2nd. Shoot your actor footage, with or without doctors depending on how you shot the background plate.

You can either use green or blue material over the actors missing limbs or simply use Visionlabs masking features to roto out the missing limbs. Wrap bandages around your actors limbs where you think they should be.

To make it look like the bandages are wrapped around "stubs"... wrap them around something circular and take a picture of them. Use several angles depending on your shots "refer back to your storyboard for this"
Import those photos into an image editing app like photoshop or gimp and erase the parts that you don't need but make sure the pics have an alpha channel.

Place your background layer on the timeline followed by your injured actor footage. Key out the blue or green material to reveal the background plate and making the illusion of your actor having missing limbs. Be wary of shadows which you may also have to roto.
Place the "nub" pics that you took on the timeline and scale them up or down as needed so they fit on the end of your actors severed limbs. Hand track them so they seem to move along with your injured actors limbs.

You may have to adjust for brightness and contrast variations between the backplate and the actor footage so be wary of that as well. You should also use a directional or Gausian blur on the "nub" pics to simulate motion blur if your actor moves his limbs too much. And also match the noise and grain "if any" from your actor footage onto the nub pcs because they are just well... pics.

Hope this helps.
Posted: Mon, 15th Feb 2010, 12:44am

Post 3 of 5

FXhomer40781

Force: 1000 | Joined: 25th May 2007 | Posts: 32

VisionLab User

Gold Member

another quick question, Spydurhank ... I was wanting (in a diffrent movie) to have a scene where dishes in a kitchen starting flying around on their own. (Like a ghost in Poltegiest). Would I use just an actor dressed all in a green suit? Also, would it be at all possible to do this without tripod? And simply holding the camera? Thanks.


spydurhank wrote:

Yeah you can do it in Visionlab. The more frequently your injured actor moves his severed limbs... the more difficult it will become to composite.

You'll want to prepare a storyboard for all the effects shots and then shoot with a stationary camera on a tripod.

1st you need a background plate without your injured actor in it. You can have other actors "doctors" if you really need them in this background layer.

2nd. Shoot your actor footage, with or without doctors depending on how you shot the background plate.

You can either use green or blue material over the actors missing limbs or simply use Visionlabs masking features to roto out the missing limbs. Wrap bandages around your actors limbs where you think they should be.

To make it look like the bandages are wrapped around "stubs"... wrap them around something circular and take a picture of them. Use several angles depending on your shots "refer back to your storyboard for this"
Import those photos into an image editing app like photoshop or gimp and erase the parts that you don't need but make sure the pics have an alpha channel.

Place your background layer on the timeline followed by your injured actor footage. Key out the blue or green material to reveal the background plate and making the illusion of your actor having missing limbs. Be wary of shadows which you may also have to roto.
Place the "nub" pics that you took on the timeline and scale them up or down as needed so they fit on the end of your actors severed limbs. Hand track them so they seem to move along with your injured actors limbs.

You may have to adjust for brightness and contrast variations between the backplate and the actor footage so be wary of that as well. You should also use a directional or Gausian blur on the "nub" pics to simulate motion blur if your actor moves his limbs too much. And also match the noise and grain "if any" from your actor footage onto the nub pcs because they are just well... pics.

Hope this helps.
Posted: Mon, 15th Feb 2010, 12:58am

Post 4 of 5

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker MacOS User

SuperUser

If you want to handhold a shot like that, then you will want to do the effects practically, on set, using invisible thread or something similar.

VisionLab doesn't have the tools to track the movement of the camera to easily composite elements together in a handheld shot. You could do it with an actor in a green suit, but fishing line or some sort of invisible thread (available at a magic shop) would probably be quicker, easier, and bring better results.

If you find that you need to use a technique involving compositing in post, then locking off the camera on a tripod will be almost essential.
Posted: Mon, 15th Feb 2010, 1:36am

Post 5 of 5

spydurhank

Force: 1956 | Joined: 24th Jun 2008 | Posts: 1357

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Gold Member

You could do it hand held... but why in the world would you want to do all of that extra work?confused Matching a camera move is not difficult "depending on the complexity of your camera movement" but it does take a great deal of time because you have to do it manually frame by painstaking frame. If you do shoot it hand held... I suggest slow and stable camera movement to make life easier on yourself.

So that you understand what I mean... shoot some practice footage with some generous camera movement. Import that footage into Visionlab then place any effects object over the footage on the timeline. I.e. muzzleflash, neonlight, or an optic.

Pick a spot on your footage where you want that effect to remain visible and stationary, table, wall, door or window... whatever you choose.
Notice that the effects object does not move along with the footage to appear as if it belongs. it stays in place right where you originally placed it. That means manually hand tracking or matchmoving the effects object to compensate for the camera movement. Frame by frame. sad

You can do this but it will take some planning ahead of time on your part.