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Bluescreen or Greenscreen is there really a difference?

BSG or Stargate ??

Stargate0%[ 0 ]
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Total Votes : 1

Posted: Fri, 19th Feb 2010, 10:05pm

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Commander Kalif

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Greetings folks,

I would like a bit of help choosing a blue screen or a green screen. I see there are a few films made with bluescreen, but many newer films using greenscreen. Which tool is better and why? If you have plenty of experience in this, would you be open to consulting on a project?
Posted: Fri, 19th Feb 2010, 10:36pm

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Chao2

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No. There is no difference in the effect whatsoever. I've used both and they work equally.
Posted: Fri, 19th Feb 2010, 10:41pm

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Commander Kalif

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If there is no effect, why are so many people using green screens instead of blue screens. Why the big change?
Posted: Fri, 19th Feb 2010, 10:41pm

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Axeman

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The primary consideration is what you will be filming. If you are filming Gonzo, since he is blue, you will need to use a greenscreen. If you are filming a woman in a green dress, you will need to use a bluescreen. If the color of the wardrobe is flexible you could always change the dress instead, but this isn't always an option. For example, if you are working on a film project titled "The Woman in Green."

Other than that, as long as they are lit properly the results should be fine. Greenscreen has traditionally been the chroma color of choice for digital video, because most cameras record more color data in the green channel than in any other color channel, so green provides an advantage there. The more color data you have to work with, the more accurate your key will be. Blue was traditionally the color of choice in film, as blue is the farthest color from skin tones, and more often than not what was being bluescreened was people.

But as I mentioned before, either color can provide good results if it is lit properly.
Posted: Fri, 19th Feb 2010, 10:51pm

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Commander Kalif

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Thanks for that too Axeman,

I will be shooting a sci-fi. But in our stage of preproduction, I keep noticing a hint of blue in many other colors. Especially grey's and other darker colors. Do you think it is easier to "light" green over blue? Green seems to have a higher Luminescence.

In previous experiences, it appeared that there would be a washout with the use of a blue screen and alot of extra compositing and several keys had to be applied to take out the blurry background.

But at any case, I appreciate your help with this answer.
Posted: Fri, 19th Feb 2010, 11:52pm

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Axeman

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Yep, the luminescence of green is higher, which can help make lighting it easier.
Posted: Mon, 22nd Feb 2010, 10:15am

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Struker

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Axeman wrote:

Greenscreen has traditionally been the chroma color of choice for digital video, because most cameras record more color data in the green channel than in any other color channel, so green provides an advantage there. The more color data you have to work with, the more accurate your key will be.
Yes, and that's the best argument for greenscreen. No matter what you're filming, there's no justification for using a less-efficient technique when a better one is readily available.

Even if you're chromakeying an actor in an exterior shot with lots of green objects around, you can always mask them off and so still use a green key in the unmasked area.

In photography, push everything to its limits, but no farther.
.