You are viewing an archive of the old fxhome.com forums. The community has since moved to hitfilm.com.

Help with using VisionLab with Sony Vegas 9

Posted: Thu, 4th Mar 2010, 6:11pm

Post 1 of 11

WillPhanto1

Force: 0 | Joined: 4th Mar 2010 | Posts: 1

Member

Hi, I'm a Vegas user and I see bundles of VisionLab with Vegas, and in the trailer for visionlab I saw Vegas being listed as being compatible with it. Although I downloaded the demo and found that VisionLab is only compatible with mov. and avi. type files which have compatibly issues with Vegas. That, and I edit using raw Full HD files (1920 x 1080i TOD. files) from my JVC HD camera which Vegas opens and edits without conversion. What's the best possible means to use Vegas and VisionLab together? I solution to this would help me with my decision to buy the full version of VisionLab.
Posted: Thu, 4th Mar 2010, 8:09pm

Post 2 of 11

Frederick

Force: 1010 | Joined: 25th Aug 2007 | Posts: 20

VisionLab User Windows User

Gold Member

I use Vegas Pro 8, Visionlab and a Sony HDR-SR1 which outputs avchd files in .mts which Vegas handles fine. I have to import the clips into Vegas and then render each scene I want to work on in Visionlab to a new uncompressed avi. I import the avi into Visionlab to do the compositing, grading or whatever and then render that as an uncompressed avi back to my project folder. I then import that new clip back into my Vegas project and replace the raw clip with the new Visionlab avi. One issue is that you need to adjust the clip properties for the Visionlab avi so that the aspect ratio is correct (in my case 1.33). There may be a better workflow involving proxy files but I am a home user and do not know such advanced features of Vegas. If anyone else has a more streamlined approach please share.
Posted: Thu, 4th Mar 2010, 8:28pm

Post 3 of 11

RigomrtsFX

Force: 1516 | Joined: 14th Apr 2006 | Posts: 267

VisionLab User

Gold Member

sony vegas can run divx and xvid you will need the DivX Codec
i do this all the time and save my movies to divx movie sometimes
and import my clips to divx when i want

and when you want to save your movie to DivX that tab will show up in the settings
Posted: Fri, 5th Mar 2010, 9:10am

Post 4 of 11

Simon K Jones

Force: 27955 | Joined: 1st Jan 2002 | Posts: 11683

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker Windows User

FXhome Team Member

Yikes, definitely don't use divx. It's a codec designed for final delivery, not for editing.

What problems does Vegas have with AVI and MOV? I've used both extensively with Vegas without any problems.
Posted: Thu, 27th May 2010, 12:53pm

Post 5 of 11

Biotron

Force: 600 | Joined: 22nd Dec 2006 | Posts: 15

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

Tarn wrote:

Yikes, definitely don't use divx. It's a codec designed for final delivery, not for editing.

What problems does Vegas have with AVI and MOV? I've used both extensively with Vegas without any problems.
Hi Tarn,

Hopefully these are not stupid questions, I'm just trying to get a handle on AVCHD:

1. If you have AVCHD files and just want to do some basic editing (trim some scenes, menus, etc.) and then burn to DVD, then leaving them at AVCHD would be fine and dandy. Right?

2. If you have files that require heavy duty editing, for lets say film work, then leaving them at AVCHD would not be the best option. You would want to capture them to an editing codec like .AVI and then create your final work in MPEG-4 or AVCHD. Right?

3. When converting AVCHD to something like uncompressed AVI, the file sizes are very large. I'm assuming this is because the conversion removes the compression and then adds the AVI wrapper?

Thanks for your help.

Dave
Posted: Thu, 27th May 2010, 1:08pm

Post 6 of 11

Simon K Jones

Force: 27955 | Joined: 1st Jan 2002 | Posts: 11683

VisionLab User VideoWrap User PhotoKey 5 Pro User MuzzlePlug User PowerPlug User PhotoKey 3 Plug-in User FXhome Movie Maker FXpreset Maker Windows User

FXhome Team Member

I've not worked with AVCHD myself, so I'm not the man to ask.

However, your third question I can answer. AVCHD is compressed video, while uncompressed video is...uncompressed, obviously. smile Do to it being uncompressed, the filesize is BIIiiiiig. It's nothing to do with the AVI wrapper, it's specifically due to the codec - or the lack of codec, rather.

HD video in an uncompressed form takes up a lot of space.
Posted: Thu, 27th May 2010, 1:17pm

Post 7 of 11

Biotron

Force: 600 | Joined: 22nd Dec 2006 | Posts: 15

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

Tarn wrote:

I've not worked with AVCHD myself, so I'm not the man to ask.

However, your third question I can answer. AVCHD is compressed video, while uncompressed video is...uncompressed, obviously. smile Do to it being uncompressed, the filesize is BIIiiiiig. It's nothing to do with the AVI wrapper, it's specifically due to the codec - or the lack of codec, rather.

HD video in an uncompressed form takes up a lot of space.
Thanks!
Posted: Thu, 27th May 2010, 1:39pm

Post 8 of 11

ChillyZebra

Force: 55 | Joined: 29th Apr 2010 | Posts: 24

Member

Rating: +1

Biotron wrote:

1. If you have AVCHD files and just want to do some basic editing (trim some scenes, menus, etc.) and then burn to DVD, then leaving them at AVCHD would be fine and dandy. Right?

2. If you have files that require heavy duty editing, for lets say film work, then leaving them at AVCHD would not be the best option. You would want to capture them to an editing codec like .AVI and then create your final work in MPEG-4 or AVCHD. Right?
The main thing you want to avoid, is more than one recompression. AVCHD uses an MPEG-4 codec to compress. So, if you're just loading, cutting and moving around, then rendering, it doesn't matter. But if you're going to edit a scene, send it to VisionLab to do some FX with, then bring it back into the editing software to final edit and render, each time the frames are decoded and re-encoded, you loss more and more information. In this case, either uncompressed or a lossless codec is your best bet.

One thing, AVI and MOV are simply wrappers. They essentially specify where in the file each video and audio frames are. The codec is the mathematical formula used to encode/decode the individual audio and video frames.

Biotron wrote:

3. When converting AVCHD to something like uncompressed AVI, the file sizes are very large. I'm assuming this is because the conversion removes the compression and then adds the AVI wrapper?
One way to mitigate the file sizes is to use a lossless compression codec. This gives you the benefit of being able to re-encode as many times as you like without any loss, but still have smaller files than straight uncompressed video. I use Lagarith, as it also supports alpha, which is necessary on occasion.
Posted: Thu, 27th May 2010, 1:54pm

Post 9 of 11

Biotron

Force: 600 | Joined: 22nd Dec 2006 | Posts: 15

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User VideoWrap User FXhome Movie Maker

Gold Member

Thanks ChillyZebra. That clears it up.
Posted: Thu, 27th May 2010, 2:30pm

Post 10 of 11

alienux

Force: 1050 | Joined: 6th Jan 2010 | Posts: 299

CompositeLab Pro User EffectsLab Pro User Windows User

Gold Member

WillPhanto1 wrote:

mov. and avi. type files which have compatibly issues with Vegas..
I'm also curious about this. Like Tarn, I've used both .mov and .avi files with Vegas extensively in my projects, and I've not had a single issue with either.
Posted: Wed, 2nd Jun 2010, 6:04pm

Post 11 of 11

theart

Force: 0 | Joined: 2nd Jun 2010 | Posts: 1

Member

ChillyZebra wrote:

Biotron wrote:

1. If you have AVCHD files and just want to do some basic editing (trim some scenes, menus, etc.) and then Las Vegas Flamingo Hotel Palms Hotel Las Vegas

2. If you have files that require heavy duty editing, for lets say film work, then leaving them at AVCHD would not be the best option. You would want to capture them to an editing codec like .AVI and then create your final work in MPEG-4 or AVCHD. Right?
The main thing you want to avoid, is more than one recompression. AVCHD uses an MPEG-4 codec to compress. So, if you're just loading, cutting and moving around, then rendering, it doesn't matter. But if you're going to edit a scene, send it to VisionLab to do some FX with, then bring it back into the editing software to final edit and render, each time the frames are decoded and re-encoded, you loss more and more information. In this case, either uncompressed or a lossless codec is your best bet. Las Vegas Excalibur Hotel Las Vegas Fitzgeralds Hotel

One thing, AVI and MOV are simply wrappers. They essentially specify where in the file each video and audio frames are. The codec is the mathematical formula used to encode/decode the individual audio and video frames.

Biotron wrote:

3. When converting AVCHD to something like uncompressed AVI, the file sizes are very large. I'm assuming this is because the conversion removes the compression and then adds the AVI wrapper?
One way to mitigate the file sizes is to use a lossless compression codec. This gives you the benefit of being able to re-encode as many times as you like without any loss, but still have smaller files than straight uncompressed video. I use Lagarith, as it also supports alpha, which is necessary on occasion. Las Vegas Caesars Palace Circus Circus Hotel in Las Vegas
I was facing similar problems... found that very helpful.
Thanks!
-Taylor