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Getting the 24p Look. What are the consequences?

Posted: Mon, 4th Oct 2010, 9:40am

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Darth Stazz the Powerful

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I'm sure this topic has been brought up multiple times. Many filmmakers in America wish to be able to film in 24p. However, cameras with such capabilities are more expensive than your average handycam which films in 60i. Seems like the easiest thing to do would be to simply set your desired export framerate to 24 or 23.98. However, I'm sure there must be consequences for doing that. My question: What am I risking by exporting 60i footage into 24p footage, and what can I do to overcome the consequences?
Posted: Mon, 4th Oct 2010, 9:55am

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Sollthar

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What am I risking by exporting 60i footage into 24p footage, and what can I do to overcome the consequences?
You risk very jerky playback or ugly, nasty frameblending simply because... well... you have 60 images per second and turn them into 24, which means 36 of them have to go somewhere.


And now for my usual rant:

24p Playback is another of those huge internet things that is utterly utterly misunderstood and completely useless.

Films in the cinema project at 24 frames per second, your TV doesn't, your DVD player doesn't...
Which means: Unless you plan to showcase your film in a cinema, blown up to 35mm film which plays at 24 frames a second, having a film in 24p will give you a film in a format that neither your TV nor your DVD player properly supports. Your computer monitor does, okay - but unless you directly film in 24p, whatever you'll do to your material in postproduction to turn it into 24p will only MAKE YOUR FOOTAGE LOOK WORSE.

24 frames per second won't somehow miraculously make your audience go "Whoa! This looks like a theatrical film man!". Yes, I realize that the NTSC format with its 29,97291738 frames per second probably looks like video to you and different from film - that's because it IS video and not a film! That's not per se down to the framerate.


So take my advice: Unless you are really planning to blow up your movie to film and have it projected in a cinema, don't bother with trying to turn anything into 24p. It will not do anything but screw up your footage.
Posted: Mon, 4th Oct 2010, 11:13am

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Joshua Davies

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If your camera can do 30p or 25p then there is no need to bother with 24p.

Those formats are going to be better supported by your TV and DVD equipment and give you the same, slightly stuttered, look compared to super-fluid 60i footage.
Posted: Mon, 4th Oct 2010, 6:56pm

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Darth Stazz the Powerful

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So then the best thing to do would be sticking to the 29.97 framerate that my camera films in and simply deinterlacing it before rendering?
Posted: Wed, 6th Oct 2010, 8:15am

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Darth Stazz the Powerful

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Would this be the proper way to go?
Posted: Wed, 6th Oct 2010, 6:49pm

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Axeman

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Yes,if you are capturing in 30fps, then its probably best to stick with that throughout.

If the footage is captured in 24p, then there will be a different amount of motion blur on each frame when compared to 30p or especially 60i footage. Changing the framerate after it is captured won't affect the amount of motion blur per frame, and therefore won't create the look of 24p footage.
Posted: Wed, 6th Oct 2010, 7:30pm

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Darth Stazz the Powerful

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OK I understand. Thanks guys.