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Filters

Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 3:28pm

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Poseidon1231

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I just got a Rebel XSI for Christmas and I am looking into getting some filters and was wondering if anyone had any suggestions?
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 4:24pm

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Axeman

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Get a good circular Polarizer, as that is one filter that can't be replicated in post, in any way. Other than that, maybe a set of ND filters, including a graduated ND or two.

Those are going to be the most useful in general, though it also depends on what type of shooting you are doing.
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 6:26pm

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B3N

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Also, if you get a UV filter that stops any haziness and are usually used as a lense protector. They don't do much to your photos though. But I agree with Axeman here, het a Polarizer, they are wonderful filters, especially for cloud photography.
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 6:27pm

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swintonmaximilian

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Yes, definitely get a polariser, they are essential.
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 7:10pm

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Poseidon1231

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http://www.amazon.com/58mm-Filter-Canon-Rebel-18-55mm/dp/B003DKAGZS
Found these online and they seem pretty nice but what do the other two do?
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 8:38pm

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Axeman

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Those aren't what I would call nice, they are dirt cheap, but they are real glass, so at least that is in their favor. The trouble with really cheap polarizers is that they often shift the colors in your images. I've not had any experience whatsoever with Neewer filters, so I can't say for sure what kind of quality they have going on, but I would certainly be cautious with something that affordable. If you lay a polarizer on a white sheet of paper, you shouldn't see any color shift in the polarizer, it should just appear a bit darker.

The other two filters are a UV, which essentially serves to protect your lens, and an FLD which corrects for shooting in Flourescent light. A FLD is completely unnecessary, as you can correct the white balance in-camera without having to shoot through an additional piece of glass on the lens.

For reference, this is an affordable but still very nice polarizer.
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 8:42pm

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Serpent

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If you want a cheap brand, go for the lower end Tiffen filters, or Hoya. A company known for filters, a singular filter, will be a much better investment than a cheap little filter kit that will end up making your image just look worse. Don't put bad glass on your nice glass.

EDIT-Or the B+W that Axeman linked to, didn't see that.
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 10:11pm

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Poseidon1231

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Thanks biggrin and I have one more question would it be worth it to get a lens hood?
Posted: Mon, 10th Jan 2011, 11:26pm

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Serpent

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Worth it is up to you. But I use mine every time I go out and shoot, and when it's not on the lens, I'll find a composition I want to capture where I'm getting a glare, and the hood solves the problem. So if you want to save on shipping and think you'll need one, you might as well.

I only have them for my telephoto and wide angle lenses though, personally, based on my shooting style. If you want to mess around more in the field then you can better guage what would be 'worth it' for you.

Rubber cup-style hoods are also great for shooting through glass, if you ever need to do that, as they block reflections from external light.
Posted: Tue, 11th Jan 2011, 12:02am

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Axeman

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I'd highly recommend a lens hood. It both protects your lens from most inadvertant impacts, but is also very useful for reducing flare.

To further explain what Serpent and I were both mentioning earlier with regard to filters, every piece of glass that the image has to go through to get to the sensor will impact the quality of the final image. So taking a nice lens, with very meticulously selected and ground glass inside, and throwing a cheap filter in front, where the same attention to quality was perhaps not bothered with, will negatively impact every image that comes through it. That's why paying a bit more for the nice filters is worthwhile.
Posted: Tue, 11th Jan 2011, 12:17am

Post 11 of 11

Poseidon1231

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Aright thanks guys that was really helpful biggrin