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One of my pics...

Posted: Sat, 17th Sep 2011, 8:53pm

Post 1 of 6

MamaCas

Force: 750 | Joined: 1st Oct 2010 | Posts: 16

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This is a photo I took of my youngest granddaughter. She's a terrific model. Me? I'm trying to develop some style and substance to go along with my enthusiasm. I'm hoping to get a lil' feedback on this one, maybe? Thanks to anyone who replies. smile

http://www.flickr.com/photos/xsankofa/6156815264/in/photostream
Posted: Wed, 22nd Feb 2012, 7:27am

Post 2 of 6

karlaa

Force: 0 | Joined: 22nd Feb 2012 | Posts: 5

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wow, pretty nice picturs there..and this is my feedback..i want to ask which kind of camera did you use there cause it seems to be a very efficent one


http://aperfectcelebration.com/wedding-reception-photos-2/
Posted: Wed, 22nd Feb 2012, 3:20pm

Post 3 of 6

MamaCas

Force: 750 | Joined: 1st Oct 2010 | Posts: 16

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Thank you!! Coming from a real photographer like you (I clicked on your link and went to your fabulous site!!), that gives me some hope that i'll be able to really get into the business someday myself.
The cameras that I used are pretty basic intro level DSLR's. The photo portraits were taken with a Nikon D3000 and the phto of the Science Center was taken using an Olympus E-410. I bought the cameras a couple of years apart but still use both. The one of the guy (my oldest son) was also taken using green screen and FX Home Photokey software.
I take lots of pictures but don't post much of my own work anymore because I don't have an actual shop yet and this guy who does have a shop would see what i was doing and then use my themes in his work and then post it on his FB page. I figured if he kept doing that then people would think i was copying his work/style and not the other way around.
Thank you so much for your positive feedback...it is very encouraging.
biggrin
Posted: Wed, 22nd Feb 2012, 4:56pm

Post 4 of 6

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

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SuperUser

That's a nice image. You've got your subject's eyes toward the light, to get some nice catchlights going, but having her eyes turned so far away from the camera results in a huge amount of the whites of her eyes showing. Maybe having her look more forward, and then turning her entire head a bit more, rather than just turning her eyes, might work better?

I also think using less of the vignette effect in post might be good, if you could get a bit less light on the background when you shoot. The vignette helps the subject pop nicely, but if you illuminate the subject selectively, and not the background, then you could get a better version of the same result i think, without it looking so heavily processed.
Posted: Wed, 22nd Feb 2012, 9:58pm

Post 5 of 6

MamaCas

Force: 750 | Joined: 1st Oct 2010 | Posts: 16

PhotoKey 4 User

Gold Member

Thanks, Axeman. I see exactly what you are saying. I think I took that photo about a year ago and I believe every picture I shot that day was luck of the draw. She was actually looking at her Dad who was off to the side holding a lightstand horizontally over her head for me because I didn't have a boom stand. The eye whites bothered me too. I am definately going to leave off with the vignette. The more I study what I've done in the past the more I realize that overkill is a sign of wanting to cover up flaws that should not be there anyway. I have been and am still working on those flaws. Less light on the background and much less post processing. Back then I was actually post-processing in Photshop whereas now I primarily use Lightroom. Printing from LR is much better for some reason and my print profiles seem to identify better with LR than with PS CS4. Now I use the PS CS4 mostly for graphic design, along with Illustrator and InDesign.
If possible, I would like to become good enough that the main post processing I have to do would be to deliberately change a look in the Develop module, not to correct it.
Of course, with your professional eye, I am sure that you are aware that I knew little to nothing about my camera's settings, lol. I still fiddle around with the settings a lot and the more comfortable I become with it, the better able I am to place my lighting set-up, on and off camera. My son won't allow me to touch his camera because he's afraid that I'll change it from the original factory settings. What good is a camera if you can't fiddle with the settings to your heart's content? Most people around here pretty much don't know the difference between good and mediocre photography but I study the work of others, I attend online photography workshops hosted by noted photgraphers and pretty much read everything I can about exposure, aperture, mode, noise, etc. I'd like to be good enough to reach past my immediate surroundings and maybe just wind up with a good reputation.
Thank you again for your constructive feedback. It makes me feel relevant. Blessings to you.
Posted: Thu, 23rd Feb 2012, 12:48am

Post 6 of 6

Axeman

Force: 17995 | Joined: 20th Jan 2002 | Posts: 6124

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I think any photographer, if they were to look at their work from a year ago, will see things they wish they'd done differently, and (hopefully) know how they would improve it if they were to reshoot it now. That's a good thing, its progress.

Learning your camera settings is definitely very important,,and both studying the manual and classes can be very helpful, but neither will really be of use if you don't get the camera in your hands and start fiddling with stuff. Every camera will have an option to reset everything to the factory defaults, so there shouldn't be too much concern about screwing stuff up while experimenting. On the other hand, its not much use to just madly change settings and shoot pictures, you need to experiment with a purpose in mind, and monitor what you are changing, how much, and the effect on the images.

As far as online course, if you like that sort of thing, I can't recommend www.creativelive.com enough - they offer entirely free, live, interactive courses with some of the best photographers out there. They also record all of them, and offer the videos afterward for a fee. I've watched many of their classes, and they are invariably excellent. Do yourself a favor and check them out if you aren't familiar with them yet.