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Glossary Additions

Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 5:47am

Post 1 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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I was up late and figured I'd search around for some terms to add to your Glossary. Not sure which ones you want to use, or what else your looking for. But I thought it'd help lower the workload smile. I'll keep updating over the next couple days. If any of you guys have some, be sure to post! Note: Not all of these are my own definitions. Many have been partially taken from other resources. I have the links if you would like to obtain them. I figured you guys would probably want to alter these and come up with your own versions to "own" the rights to them.

A

A and B rolls: Two separated reels of video on which scenes are alternately placed to perform special effects.

Abby Singer - The second-to-last shot of the day.

Action - Is called during filming to indicate the start of the current take.

Ambient noise - background sound of a location, such as traffic

Analytic editing - where a movie sequence is constructed like an argument rather than a narrative

Aperture - A measure of the width of the opening allowing light to enter a camera. (AKA: F-stop)

B

Backlot - A large undeveloped part of land at a sound stage for large open-aired environment scenes.

Behind the scenes - The off-camera goings on, on a film set.

Biographic picture - A filmed story of a person's life.

Boom: A long movable stand, crane, arm, or pole for mounting and moving a microphone (boom microphone) or camera

Barn doors - Flaps attached to sides of lights, to blank off light sources or control their spread and direction

Blimp - a cover that is used on noisy cameras to muffle out the sounds

Blonde - 2,000 watt spotlight

Buzz track - recording of ambient noise (see above) and background atmosphere of a scene. AKA 'atmosphere' track or just 'atmos'


C

Captioning: The process of superimposing subtitles at the bottom of the screen

Close-up (CU): A tight photograph or shot, generally of the face and shoulders; a close shot.

Color bar: A strip of gradation of primary colors and black, used for TV testing and for color standardization and accuracy.

Color correction: The changing of color shadings in a video picture. Some of it
is to make adjustments, but most of it is necessary to print the scene as it
was orginally shot. Color correction is also important to maintain continuity, especially if various shots in a scene or sequence are done at different times of the day or even on different days.

Compression: Things are compressed or made smaller in file size. This is quite important when making file transfers with a dialup account.

Continuity: "Continuous action". The action seems to flow continuously across the edit points. The action flows so smoothly that the audience is aware of the story and the action but doesn’t notice the editing. These include hair styles, costumes, props, and lighting.

Cine-verite - (cinema truth) a term usually describing 'fly on the wall' documentary-style shooting, where the filmmaker uses hand held cameras and records their subjects without influencing them or interfering with them (AKA 'Direct cinema')

Cross fade - a transition where one shot gradually disappears whilst at the same time the next shot gradually appears (AKA dissolve, mix)

Crossing the line - the line is the imaginary 180 degree divide that separates the camera from the actors. In a scene where there is cutting between actors, the actors should only be shot from one side only. For example, an actor facing right in one shot should face right in the next shot he appears in, so he always appears to be talking to the actor facing left. Otherwise there would be discontinuity. It's a difficult concept to get to grips with but imagine a football game. The cameras must be on the same side of the pitch throughout the game so we know who is attacking which end! And if you're tracking your actors from right to left don't decide to shoot from the other side and shoot them from left to right, as this would also upset the visual continuity.

D

Dailies - Playback of the film shot that day, so that the actors and the director can see how the picture is shaping up.

Dolly: A mobile platform with three of four wheels for carrying a microphone, camera, or other items

Drop frame time code: A system that keeps the time of a videotape accurate by dropping two numbers every minute to make up for the small error that results from assuming that video runs exactly 30 frames per second (video actually runs 29.97 frames per second).

Deepfocus shot - A shot where both the foreground and background are in focus.

Depth of field - the space in which a camera's subjects are in focus, or 'sharp'.

Diagesis - a film conveying the story in a narrative way, where someone is telling and narrating the story

Digital compositing - A process where seperately shot film components are digitally edited together. Example: Bluescreening/Keying.

Directors cut - A final cut of the picture outside of the standard editing time. The director is given 6 weeks to make a finishing edit and has complete artistic control of the content.

Dub - transferring content from one tape to another. Also, in editing, dubbing involves editing sound, e.g. mixing and balancing it

Dutch tilt - where the camera is set up at a slight diagonal angle to provide a strange perspective. For examples, see Carol Reed's The Third Man and Orson Welles' Citizen Kane

DVE- digital video edit

E

EDL - Edit decision list, documenting the time code of the start and end of shots, enabling an editor or even editing program to cut the movie together. It can be used to create the Paper edit, a previsualisation of the film, but on paper

Effects stock - Film stock that used by the second unit to generate computerized composites.

Epic - A film with large dramatic scope or that required an immense production.

Eye line - to match reverse angles, Point of View Shots and where the actor looks offscreen, they should be given a fixed direction to look at, ideally an actual prop or spot. Used extensively in films like Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Stuart Little where the actors had to look at animated characters who would be added later in post production

Extreme close-up - where the camera is focussing on detail, such as zooming in on the eyes or mouth.

Extreme long shot - like long shot, but subject is far away


F

Fake Shemp - Anyone appearing on screen whose face is not seen. The term was coined by Sam Raimi (Evil Dead trilogy) and taken from Hollywood folklore about a stand-in for Howard Shemp after his death.

Follow shot: A movement of a camera to follow the action

Fade - where footage is gradually darkened until it disappears, leaving black. You can also have fade outs where you fade from black to your footage. Fades usually define the end of a sequence

Feature film - A movie at least 40-45 minutes (2 reels) long intended for theatrical release.

Film stock - The physical medium on which photographic images are recorded.

Fine cut/Final cut - final edited version of your film

Flood - a broad spread of light, contrasting with a spot which is intense and narrow angled

G

Giraffe - A mechanically extendable and manipulated boom microphone.

Grip: A general assistant in a stage, broadcast, or film production. Types of grips include dolly grip, key grip, and lighting grip.

Grading - involves processing film/video for their optimum colour and quality

Gun mike - directional microphone (super cardioid) picking up sound at a narrow angle of acceptance. Can be used at greater distances than omnidirectional mikes

H

Handheld - shooting without tripod

Head room - area between top of frame and actors head. Care should be taken to not allow there to be too much or too little space

Hot set - A scene which is in the process of being shot.

I

Idling - In the chat, most users spend the day "Idling". They are not ignoring you, just simply away from the keyboard.

J

Jump cut: A transition in a film or TV program that breaks continuous time by skipping forward from one part of an action to another.

K

L

Lens flare - caused when light strikes the lens, creating a graphical effect. Many programs, such as AlamDV, have ways to replicate this effect.

Locked down shot - where the tilt and pan screws on the tripod have been tightened so that the camera is incapable of movement. Especially necessary for some special effects shots such as compositing or rotoscoping, or where an actor is made to disappear

Logging - involves logging the time code of footage. Ideally, it should be logged before and after the camera is recording each take

M

Medium close-up - a shot from above the head to just below the armpits

Medium shot (MS): A camera position between a close-up and a long shot--for instance, the view of a person from the head to the waist or lower

Medium long shot - where the entire body is framed leaving a small space above and below

Mic - a tool used to amplify and clean up the sound of an actors voice and other special noises

Mise-En-Scene: All the things that are "put in the scene": the setting, the decor, the lighting, the costumes, the performance etc. Narrative films often manipulate the elements of mise-en-scene, such as decor, costume, and acting to intensify or undermine the ostensible significance of a particular scene.

Montage - a sequence consisting of image juxtaposition/contrast, a flow and rhythm of images and sounds

Morphing: A computer process that transforms one photograph or image into another.

N

Non-sync - where sound is out of synchronisation with the film

O

Outtakes - footage that is not used in the final version of your film. Usually this is because someone has made a mistake, so you will often see outtakes as extras on DVDs for their entertainment and interest value

Overcranking - The process of speeding the frame rate of a camera up, so that when the captured pictures are played at the normal frame rate the action appears to be in slow motion.


P

Pan: A camera movement with the camera body turning to the right or left.

Parallel editing - intercutting (frequently) between 2 stories or scenes

Point of view (POV): A camera shot seen from or obtained from the position of a performer so that a viewer sees what the performer is seeing

Prop - an item that the actor either touches or makes reference to.

Q

R

Rack focus - change of focus in a shot to direct the attention from one thing to something else

Recce - scouting the suitability of a location. Practical considerations such as parking should be taken into account!

Reel - A strip of film wound on a metal wheel.

Reverse shot - a shot that bears relation to the previous shot. For example, if previous shot was someone entering a doorway, we now show someone exiting the doorway; in a dialogue between 2 actors, reverse shots are occuring all the time, as we cut from one face to another (maintaining the 180 degree rule of not crossing the line).

Rotoscoping - An animation technique in which images of live action are traced, either manually or automatically.

S

Set decoration - items that are on the set, but are not referenced to.

Shooting ratio - ratio between amount of footage shot and amount of footage that was used in the final film. Documentary film have very high ratios because of the amount of content generate, whereas feature film, more or less working to a predetermined schedule, will have a lower shooting ratio

T

Tilt - where the camera is moved up and down on its axis

Tracking shot - where the camera is put on a dolly and moved during the duration of a scene, in tandem with the action

U

Undercrank - running the camera slower, resulting in fast motion

V

Voice Over: When a voice, often that of a character in the film, is heard while we see an image of a space and time in which that character is not actually speaking.

W

Wide lens - lens providing a wider, extended view of the action. Used for a wide shot

X

Y

Z

Zoom lens - enables camera to draw closer to your subject without moving the camera closer

Last edited Thu, 7th Aug 2003, 6:20pm; edited 10 times in total.

Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 8:23am

Post 2 of 28

malone

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All glossary suggestions are very welcome smile
Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 11:45am

Post 3 of 28

av11d

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I remember working on a glossary for alamdv some 1 or 2 years ago. It's at the end of the AlamDV2 manual. Why don't you guys just add those terms in?
Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 12:32pm

Post 4 of 28

Mellifluous

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A

Ambient noise - background sound of a location, such as traffic

Analytic editing - where a movie sequence is constructed like an argument rather than a narrative

B

Barn doors - Flaps attached to sides of lights, to blank off light sources or control their spread and direction

Blimp - a cover that is used on noisy cameras to muffle out the sounds

Blonde - 2,000 watt spotlight

Buzz track - recording of ambient noise (see above) and background atmosphere of a scene. AKA 'atmosphere' track or just 'atmos'

C

Cine-verite - (cinema truth) a term usually describing 'fly on the wall' documentary-style shooting, where the filmmaker uses hand held cameras and records their subjects without influencing them or interfering with them (AKA 'Direct cinema')

Cross fade - a transition where one shot gradually disappears whilst at the same time the next shot gradually appears (AKA dissolve, mix)

D

Depth of field - the space in which a camera's subjects are in focus, or 'sharp'.

Diagesis - a film conveying the story in a narrative way, where someone is telling and narrating the story

Dissolve - (see cross fade above)

Dub - transferring content from one tape to another. Also, in editing, dubbing involves editing sound, e.g. mixing and balancing it

DVE- digital video edit

EDL - Edit decision list, documenting the time code of the start and end of shots, enabling an editor or even editing program to cut the movie together. It can be used to create the Paper edit, a previsualisation of the film, but on paper

Exposure - exposure of a shot depends on the amount of light entering the lens. This can usually be controlled on your digital camcorder

F

Fade - where footage is gradually darkened until it disappears, leaving black. You can also have fade outs where you fade from black to your footage. Fades usually define the end of a sequence

Fine cut/Final cut - final edited version of your film

Flood - a broad spread of light, contrasting with a spot which is intense and narrow angled

G

Grading - involves processing film/video for their optimum colour and quality

Grip - controls the dolly by moving it gently so no jolts or jerks are detectable in the footage

Gun mike - directional microphone (super cardioid) picking up sound at a narrow angle of acceptance. Can be used at greater distances than omnidirectional mikes

Logging - involves logging the time code of footage. Ideally, it should be logged before and after the camera is recording each take

M

Montage - a sequence consisting of image juxtaposition/contrast, a flow and rhythm of images and sounds

NLE - (Non linear editing) where shots are assembled and reassembled in any order. NLE programs like Avid, Final Cut Pro and Premiere allow you to copy and paste footage anywhere you like, giving complete freedom in the editing process

Non-sync - where sound is out of synchronisation with the film

S

Shooting ratio - ratio between amount of footage shot and amount of footage that was used in the final film. Documentary film have very high ratios because of the amount of content generate, whereas feature film, more or less working to a predetermined schedule, will have a lower shooting ratio

W

White balance - process of telling the camera what constitutes as white in your filming conditions. Camcorders should be rebalanced before you start shooting
Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 2:43pm

Post 5 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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Mellifluous, mind if I add yours to mine? That way new visitors won't have to scroll down through seperate lists?


Edit: I added them anyhow razz. PM me if you want them taken down.
Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 3:34pm

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Simon K Jones

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Several of these are already in the glossary, so be sure to check it before posting new entries here. smile

These will all be incorporated into the proper glossary at some point.
Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 3:37pm

Post 7 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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I'm doing my best to weed out the ones that are already in there. I'll go through and alphabetise (sp?!) them in a bit, I'm trying to find a bunch more for the letters we don't have yet.
Posted: Tue, 24th Jun 2003, 4:17pm

Post 8 of 28

Mellifluous

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Sure, delete the post, that's a more sensible way of doing it, lol, cool then you can keep track of what you've added to the glossary wink

I'll try & think of more...
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 12:57am

Post 9 of 28

Obi

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Hajiku_Flip wrote:


Blimp - a cover that is used on noisy cameras to muffle out the sounds
Thats actually called a Barney. They're also used on Boom mic's to cancel out indirect sounds.

EDIT:

H

Hot set - A scene which is in the process of being shot.

O

Overcranking - The process of speeding the frame rate of a camera up, so that when the captured pictures are played at the normal frame rate the action appears to be in slow motion.

R

Reel - A strip of film wound on a metal wheel.
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 8:19am

Post 10 of 28

Mellifluous

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Obi, there's a difference between barneys and blimps, though they are similar.

A barney is made out of material. Blimps usually made out of fibreglass. Barneys are for cameras that aren't all that noisy anyway, whilst blimps are much more effective for noisy cameras

B

Blimped camera - camera that has internal sound-proofing and has no need for an additional sound muffler

Bounce card - white or silver card used for providing soft light by directing light onto the film subject

C

Canted angle - AKA Dutch tilt

Cutaway - a shot that's inserted to cut away from the action to provide a break in what might be otherwise a monotonous matching sequence. Usually, a cutaway usually focuses on detail or can be a wide shot like landscape, as long as it provides a break from the main action. However, it should relate to the action e.g. if there's a chase through city streets there could be a swift cutaway to an aerial shot of the streets

D

Dutch tilt - where the camera is set up at a slight diagonal angle to provide a strange perspective. For examples, see Carol Reed's The Third Man and Orson Welles' Citizen Kane

E

Eye line - to match reverse angles, Point of View Shots and where the actor looks offscreen, they should be given a fixed direction to look at, ideally an actual prop or spot. Used extensively in films like Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Stuart Little where the actors had to look at animated characters who would be added later in post production

H

Handheld - shooting without tripod

Head room - area between top of frame and actors head. Care should be taken to not allow there to be too much or too little space

P

Parallel editing - intercutting (frequently) between 2 stories or scenes

T

Tilt - where the camera is moved up and down on its axis

Tracking shot - where the camera is put on a dolly and moved during the duration of a scene, in tandem with the action

W

Wide lens - lens providing a wider, extended view of the action. Used for a wide shot
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 2:40pm

Post 11 of 28

Obi

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Ooh, I see! A blimp covers the whole camera, to block out the noise? Whereas a Barney is like a big fluffy thing that covers mic's to stop unwanted noise? Sorry for my mistake crazy
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 2:56pm

Post 12 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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All right, it's updated again. I added a few more last night, and intended to do some major work tonight. Keep it up guys, the list is starting to shape up ! biggrin
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 2:59pm

Post 13 of 28

Mellifluous

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No,
both barneys and blimps can cover the whole camera, they do the same thing except blimps drown out the noise more succesfully. Must be becuase of what they're made of razz Some people use the terms interchangeably:

http://www.chamblesscineequip.com/catalog/Barney%20Blimp.htm

Looks like a punch-ball, no?! hugegrin

Mel wink
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 3:06pm

Post 14 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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To me it just looks like a special-ed camera tard
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 3:18pm

Post 15 of 28

Obi

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Hey, cheeky, you didnt add my stuff. sad
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 3:25pm

Post 16 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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Me? Yes I did. I think your looking at another post silly wink
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 3:42pm

Post 17 of 28

Mellifluous

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Here's a few more eek Hope this glossary isn't too long biggrin

Edit: I notice you've already got close-up and medium shot but I thought maybe describe the whole bunch of shots you can have? Just a suggestion

B
Big close-up - where the head nearly fills the screen

C

Close-up - a shot from above the head to just below the shoulders

Crossing the line - the line is the imaginary 180 degree divide that separates the camera from the actors. In a scene where there is cutting between actors, the actors should only be shot from one side only. For example, an actor facing right in one shot should face right in the next shot he appears in, so he always appears to be talking to the actor facing left. Otherwise there would be discontinuity. It's a difficult concept to get to grips with but imagine a football game. The cameras must be on the same side of the pitch throughout the game so we know who is attacking which end! And if you're tracking your actors from right to left don't decide to shoot from the other side and shoot them from left to right, as this would also upset the visual continuity.

E

Extreme close-up - where the camera is focussing on detail

Extreme long shot - like long shot, but subject is farther away

L

Long shot - the body is framed with more space, roughly equal, to the left, right, top and bottom of the frame


M

Medium close-up - a shot from above the head to just below the armpits

Medium shot - a shot from above the head cutting off the body at the waist

Medium long shot - where the entire body is framed leaving a small space above and below

R

Recce - scouting the suitability of a location. Practical considerations such as parking should be taken into account!

T

3/4 shot - a shot from above the head cutting off the body at the knees

V

Very close-up - a frame of the face from the chin to the forehead
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 4:14pm

Post 18 of 28

Obi

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I mentioned these earlier, and you didnt add them:

H

Hot set - A scene which is in the process of being shot.

O

Overcranking - The process of speeding the frame rate of a camera up, so that when the captured pictures are played at the normal frame rate the action appears to be in slow motion.

R

Reel - A strip of film wound on a metal wheel.
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 4:17pm

Post 19 of 28

Mellifluous

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L

Lens flare - caused when light strikes the lens

Locked down shot - where the tilt and pan screws on the tripod have been tightened so that the camera is incapable of movement. Especially necessary for some special effects shots such as compositing or rotoscoping, or where an actor is made to disappear

O
Outtakes - footage that is not used in the final version of your film. Usually this is because someone has made a mistake, so you will often see outtakes as extras on DVDs for their entertainment and interest value

R

Rack focus - change of focus in a shot to direct the attention from one thing to something else

Reverse shot - a shot that bears relation to the previous shot. For example, if previous shot was someone entering a doorway, we now show someone exiting the doorway; in a dialogue between 2 actors, reverse shots are occuring all the time, as we cut from one face to another (maintaining the 180 degree rule of not crossing the line).

U

Undercrank - running the camera slower, resulting in fast motion

Z

Zoom lens - enables camera to draw closer to your subject without moving the camera closer
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 4:18pm

Post 20 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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Obi, I see them tard Are you sure your page is refreshing properly? Try pressing Ctrl+F5. wink
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 4:29pm

Post 21 of 28

Obi

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Oops, many apologies H. Flip. Did a Ctrl refresh and.. they're there! I'll make a big list for you now. smile
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 5:00pm

Post 22 of 28

Obi

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A

Abby Singer - The second-to-last shot of the day.
Action - Is called during filming to indicate the start of the current take.
Aperture - A measure of the width of the opening allowing light to enter a camera. (AKA: F-stop)

B

Behind the scenes - The off-camera goings on, on a film set.
Backlot - A large undeveloped part of land at a sound stage for large open-aired environment scenes.
Biographic picture - A filmed story of a person's life.

D

Deepfocus shot - A shot where both the foreground and background are in focus.
Digital compositing - A process where seperately shot film components are digitally edited together. Example: Bluescreening/Keying.
Directors cut - A final cut of the picture outside of the standard editing time. The director is given 6 weeks to make a finishing edit and has complete artistic control of the content.
Dailies - Playback of the film shot that day, so that the actors and the director can see how the picture is shaping up.

E

Effects stock - Film stock that used by the second unit to generate computerized composites.
Epic - A film with large dramatic scope or that required an immense production.

F

Fake Shemp - Anyone appearing on screen whose face is not seen. The term was coined by Sam Raimi (Evil Dead trilogy) and taken from Hollywood folklore about a stand-in for Howard Shemp after his death.
Feature film - A movie at least 40-45 minutes (2 reels) long intended for theatrical release.
Film stock - The physical medium on which photographic images are recorded.

G

Giraffe - A mechanically extendable and manipulated boom microphone.

R

Rotoscoping - An animation technique in which images of live action are traced, either manually or automatically.
Rushes - Another term for 'Dailies.'

T

Telecine - The process of transferring moving images to a video signal.
THX - A subdivision of Lucasfilm Ltd. dedicated to improving picture and sound for the cinema and home.

V

Voice-over - Indicates that dialog will be heard on a movie's soundtrack, but the speaker will not be shown.

And, I think I'm pretty much spent... lol.
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 7:14pm

Post 23 of 28

Mellifluous

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Some seem to be missing from your glossary, I'm not sure whether it's intentional, forgetful or my browser not refreshing properly!

Bounce card

Cutaway

Recce

Long shot

Very close up

Unedrcrank

Rack focus

& I can't see some of Obi's sad

Forgive me if it's my computer playing up hugegrin
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 7:20pm

Post 24 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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Most of those are just because I was doing something else there for a bit, but I'm updating the list again now. A couple others (e.g. "very close up") are very similar in contrast to say Extreme close up. Perhaps they will want to add them, but its not really neccessary to include all the "closeup" shots, as there are what, 5 or 6 of them? biggrin. I'll be sure to update it again though.
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 7:30pm

Post 25 of 28

Mellifluous

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Yeah, I know there seems to be tons of shots & close-ups (lol) but I got them from an industry manual so I thought it would be good to share the complete jargon so people are used to it, in case anyone hopes to get a job as a director or cinematographer. There are distictions between them, the manual has a picture illustrating what shot ends where etc!!!

I know, it's confusing... oink

Mel wink
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 7:33pm

Post 26 of 28

Hajiku_Flip

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Your right. If the glossary was able to put up pictures, that'd be way cool. The "shot" definitions would be very helpful then, as that is the biggest problem with movies in the cinema. They just aren't sure how to place their shots. But there is plenty of room in the glossary page for pictures me
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 7:44pm

Post 27 of 28

Mellifluous

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Yeah, lots of people don't plan their movies, they just think taking the camera out & switching record is all there is to it. If they actually thought about planning shots and angles their films would improve no end

I will do some pics illustrating the shots. I won't use the manual ones cos of copyright...I'll host em on my site & post them on cool Should have them tomorrow
Posted: Wed, 25th Jun 2003, 10:11pm

Post 28 of 28

Mellifluous

Force: 5604 | Joined: 6th Oct 2002 | Posts: 3782

EffectsLab Pro User Windows User

Gold Member

Ok, here they are. They're nothing special, just rips off some of my films, but they're an accurate example of the different shots you can use:

(here's the links, their description is in the file name, best if you add the [img][/img] round them & insert them in the glossary else the pages are gonna get longer! smile

http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/bigcloseup
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/closeup
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/extremecloseup
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/longshot
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/mediumcloseup
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/mediumshot
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/threequartershot
http://lucibel.filmspace.biz/verycloseup

Hope they're ok

Mel wink